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I'm having a hard time selling my watches. Perhaps I'll give some away.

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I'm having a hard time selling my watches. Perhaps I'll give some away.

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That's always a good solution. Even a broken skeleton parnis, with a subdial hand somewhere stuck inside the movement, found a new owner that way :p I just put it on sales forum for free, only asking shipping costs.
 

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I'm having a hard time selling my watches. Perhaps I'll give some away.

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A bunch of mine were so affordable that it wasn't even worth the effort to try and sell them. I just ended up putting them in one of those public closet things where people can give or take stuff.
 
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A bunch of mine were so affordable that it wasn't even worth the effort to try and sell them. I just ended up putting them in one of those public closet things where people can give or take stuff.
I have a range probably from $50 to $500. It adds up but I don't want to spend too much energy trying to get every last penny out of them.

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I have a range probably from $50 to $500. It adds up but I don't want to spend too much energy trying to get every last penny out of them.

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If it were me, the ones worth up to $100, I'd just put up for free+shipping costs only. Rest of them, sell them at about 20% under market value and it will be a quick sale. The cheaper you make it, the quicker it goes, and the less questions will be asked - up to a point of course where its starting to look too good to be true for the buyer.

The ones that are so unpopular, they won't even go for free, bring them to a pawnshop - if even they don't want it for free, then might as well throw it (though always better if you can avoid that).
 

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A bunch of mine were so affordable that it wasn't even worth the effort to try and sell them. I just ended up putting them in one of those public closet things where people can give or take stuff.
Good solution also👍 though don't know how common those things are in the US? I guess there must at least be some equivalent though.
 

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I have a couple watches which may not sell on their own. If so, rhey will either be giveaways, or they will get shipped out as bonus watches to unsuspecting buyers.
 

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The part about you client’s battery being dead doesn’t surprise me. My wife doesn’t wear a watch often, but the 3 she has all have dead batteries. One of my coworkers for had a watch she wore everyday despite the fact that the Quartz movement had completely broken (the crown would no longer change the time), and I have a good friends who has a watch that he likes because his wife gave it to him that he wears despite the minute hand working but the hour hand stuck in place. Third coworker has an orient mako that he bought because he read an article saying it was a great watch. We work on 4 day work week and he only wears it to work, so it goes dead every weekend. After a while he stopped setting the day-date, then he stopped setting the time altogether. Moral of the story, for the non-WUS crowd they are wearing their watches for fashion primarily, and isn’t that uncommon to wear it past its usefulness as an accurate time telling device.
Yep. It highlights a non negligible proportion of people do wear watches as they would use simple jewelry. Hopefully, others also do for their overall usefulness, and part of those because they need to, but the former category are instructive examples.

In my experience doctors no longer check pulse rate with a watch nor do nurses anymore.

View attachment 15724394
Three questions then if I may, from your experience :
  • Do the doctors wash their hands after examining you ?
  • What device do they use to check your temperature ?
  • Did you see them wash the portable pulse oxymeter after using it ?


From what I've seen, for doctors, it varies depending on the practitioner's specialty, degree of mobility and personal choices. A sedentary nephrologist in a hospital, with nurses around already providing the vitals constants for him on a plate will rely more often on automated measures, whereas a general practitioner alone in the country side will be more likely to check the pressure with a manual cuff. Depending on all of that,
— some will never check the vitals manually ;
— some will do it manually (with a watch and their hands) most of the time but check with the oxymeter in case of doubt or emergency ;
— some will always measure those manually (thus always with a watch).

A growing (majority ?) proportion of nurses however seem to adopt automated apparel indeed. Including wrist blood pressure device sometimes btw, which AFAIK mostly aren't validated.

I live in France though, and those points could possibly vary among countries. :)
While I did love the OCD in the second point in reality if you need to check the pulse on a patient old-style then you'd have to place three bare fingers on his bare wrist. Obviously not the thing to do in COVID-time. Everyone nowadays just takes the pulse with the contraption that measures pO2. Cardiologists will do an ECG. And you can't check a wristwatch if you're suited up for COVID. Its best if you don't wear a watch anymore in a ward, period. I'm thoroughly washing mine when I'm off from work (and only wear steel bracelets now at work) but I don't routinely handle patients up close so it doesn't really apply to me.
If I may, unless you're into manual colonoscopy (AKA digital fecal impaction cure 🤣), the part of your body you will use to touch your patient with will not be your wrist but the tip of your fingers, possibly your palms, occasionally the non palmar side of the hand.

Thus, as everyone is aware of that, they wash their hands each time after examining or interacting manually with the patient. And so, it doesn't matter if you touch the patient, as you will cleanse your hands right afterwards. But do they wash their tools, which also where in contact with the patient every time ? Namely, the end tip of the pulse oxymeter, which touched the finger, the patient previously used to rub his ear, which is full of staphyloccus ? Do they ?

The truth is that you don't need to touch your wristwatch while checking the pulse. No contact with yourself, nor with the patient. Contrary to the pulse oxymeter. And so bacteriologically speaking, it's WAY more contaminant to use a non disposable contact device than a non disposable non contact one. Such as a watch.

To the point I've been in a infectious diseases ward where wristwatches were allowed, at the strict condition of them being adjusted in a snug way on the wrist (and so never inadvertently get in contact with the patient). I've always thought it was kinda sexist, as it allowed the (mostly male) doctors to keep their watches while the (mostly female) nurses had pocket watches tuck-on on their outfits. Yet now I do see the logic, as contrary to jewelry bracelets, a snug watch won't move up and down your arm. And thus never make contact.

And that applies in 95% circumstances. For those actually working in a COVID ward, I believe that when available they'll use an additional semi-transparent gow, which would actually cover the wrist (and thus protect the watch). :)
While I did love the OCD in the second point in reality if you need to check the pulse on a patient old-style then you'd have to place three bare fingers on his bare wrist. Obviously not the thing to do in COVID-time.
I beg to differ, but doctors and digestive surgeons would be in a deep sh*t if they couldn't touch the patient anymore, as it's required for abdominal palpation, but also for parts of the respiratory and cardiovascular exam (not to mention neurological). You can't just CT scan every patient who enters a medical office. That's part of the problem of teleconsultations btw.

The thing is it's different to touch the patient in a controlled setting (when you're examining him/her), as you can wash your hands with hydro-alcoholic solution right away, and thus start clean and finish cleansed (or wearing disposable gloves in surgical applications) ; than in an uncontrolled setting (such as shaking hands). And as far as I know, SARS-CoV-2 still dies to hydro-alcoholic solutions and soap.


Yes, you're absolutely right, nobody 'needs' a particular watch because they get into a certain hobby.

But at the end of the day, isn't watch collecting just another hobby? And as such, do we really need any justification to buy a watch beyond, "I want to have it in the collection."?

I know we're all for not buying watches here in this group, but surely none of us think that this mentality should be applied to the whole industry and the whole lot of watch collectors.

That would be a bit like the guy who smokes socially five or six days a week looking down on the guy who smokes a pack a day. It's a bit hypocritical to say, "you're allowed to like watches, but only if you don't have/buy more than X."
If I may, that's the same than with most addictions. Some people will never get addicted to alcohol, and thus won't have to restrain themselves, and will mostly benefit from the enjoyable sides of it. Some however will get addicted, and some of those will lose control. They will start needing the fix just to feel normal, just to stop the craving, instead of just enjoying it. And then starts a relationship toward the addiction where the individual will get just as much suffering from it than enjoyment, and eventually more.

I think the WPAC's concept is the same extrapolated to watches. I mean, if you're buying your 150th watch, chances are you're not really enjoying the 149 others anymore, and that the dopamine shot of buying this one will only be short lived. Your control towards the addiction will be questionable, as the mere pleasure of simply using your watches might've decreased. That's where reminding you about controlled, though-on ways of collecting might help you in restoring the enjoyment on the long term.Once again, an Epicurean thought. ^^

+1 on all of the above. Nothing wrong with having watches sinply because you like them.

It's something I've noticed a few times in this thread. People get too carried away with the bashing and anti-purchasing and go to the other extreme of bashing the hobby and the enjoyment of watches altogether. That's a thought I simply can't and won't share.

Life's not binary. There's many levels between having a few hundreds watches and saying "it's a tool and you don't need more than one". If I only did what was an absolute necessity life would be painfully and unbearably boring.
I think what Wimads wanted to convey, is that the increased segmentation of the constructors products lines tend to increase the needs. For example, regarding Victorinox Swiss Army, in the 1990 they had the Lancers 100 as polyvalent GADAs : they could be used as field watches, for swiming, as beaters and even in formal occasions. Steel case, steel bracelet, average dimensions, rotatable bezel : one watch could do it all.

Nowadays, the 2019 catalog starts with a field watch with a leather strap, and then above comes a formal diver with the rotatable bezel, and even above the rugged beater. Though those watches do perform appreciably better in their individual segment (the 2019 field watch is more legible than the 1990 GADA), they are also less suited for other needs (you won't dive with the leather strap, and will be less likely to get your elegant diver beaten while tinkering). And so... they implictly encourage the user to get one watch for each circumstance/role. 🔎

Makes me wonder again why I was ever so enamoured of mechanical watches when I have to regularly remove them to do various activities. (I needed to take it off to adjust something on a bike today, and then my kiddo stepped on it. No harm, though.) But that's another topic that's been done to death probably since Seiko released the Astron...
Honestly a lot of WUS seem to never even wonder about it, but compared to quartz, mechanicals are a no go in many circumstances. Yet there is some kind of fascination to them, hence the popularity among addicts, and in luxury.
 

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Three questions then if I may, from your experience :
  • Do the doctors wash their hands after examining you ?
  • What device do they use to check your temperature ?
  • Did you see them wash the portable pulse oxymeter after using it ?
I do not have any doctors examine me. I do accompany my wife to her appointments and her doctor does not wash his hand in the exam room. He does put on glove to administer her shoulder shot.
The nurse uses a mouth thermometer with disposable cover. She also uses a wall mounted cuff and personal stethoscope for bp and a portable oxymeter neither of which I see her clean before or after we leave her station room and move to the doctor's room.
 

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When I go to the dentist for my six month cleanings, they take BP, and they wipe down the pulseox thing with an alcohol pad before and after.

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The thing is it's different to touch the patient in a controlled setting (when you're examining him/her), as you can wash your hands with hydro-alcoholic solution right away, and thus start clean and finish cleansed (or wearing disposable gloves in surgical applications) ; than in an uncontrolled setting (such as shaking hands). And as far as I know, SARS-CoV-2 still dies to hydro-alcoholic solutions and soap.
Correct. However protocol doesn't allow palpation with naked hands. My office right now is 30m away from a COVID ward. I will not walk into there without my entire body covered in latex. And not in a sexy way. There is zero chance to check time with a wristwatch. You can do a neurological exam, an abdominal palpation/percussion (which is not all that precise as it may sound), check the thyroid and lymphatics, a lung percussion while wearing gloves.

Unfortunately most specialists won't bother. People don't get it, what a poor standard of care COVID patients receive. Its just spO2 and a chest X-ray for COVID patients. They'd be lucky to have someone feed them or give them dring if they're too weak. On occasion they are too weak to ring the bell for help. There's no one to talk to. You're in a ward with people half-dead.
 

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I do not have any doctors examine me. I do accompany my wife to her appointments and her doctor does not wash his hand in the exam room. He does put on glove to administer her shoulder shot.
The nurse uses a mouth thermometer with disposable cover. She also uses a wall mounted cuff and personal stethoscope for bp and a portable oxymeter neither of which I see her clean before or after we leave her station room and move to the doctor's room.
That's what I thought :
  • For the thermometer (which is most often in contact with the ears, in your case in the mouth), there are disposable covers to avoid contamination beween patients after contact.
  • For the pulse oxymeter, and the blood pressure cuff, there isn't covers... and yet the part in contact with the patient isn't cleansed between each.
Please understand that I do not blame your wife's doctor (though the hand wash moment might be debatable :unsure:), as those devices are kind of a dead angle. It would take quite a significant amount of resources and time to clean them in-between each use. However, while most patients don't actually rub their ears, clean their nose or touch their mouth with their arm ; they do with their fingers. Which are in contact with the pulse oxymeter.

And so from a contamination/hygiene point of view, watch + cleansed hands > pulse oxymeter.
Another detail is that in case of irregular pulse, your finger is going to identify more precisely the irregularity, and the type of irregularity ; while pulse oxymeters and automatic bp cuffs won't, if they do signal the irregularity to begin with.

So yeah, some old school things still have pros. 😃
Correct. However protocol doesn't allow palpation with naked hands. My office right now is 30m away from a COVID ward. I will not walk into there without my entire body covered in latex. And not in a sexy way. There is zero chance to check time with a wristwatch. You can do a neurological exam, an abdominal palpation/percussion (which is not all that precise as it may sound), check the thyroid and lymphatics, a lung percussion while wearing gloves.
You can check the pulse with gloved hands though (that what's done upon reanimating someone in cardiac arrest for example, you're not going to check a femoral pulse bare handed =p). I'm don't remember about how legible would be a watch under a semi-transparent gown though. But what you're describing here is an hospital's COVID ward ; there are a lot of doctors who work in different conditions, including outside of hospitals. And for whom a watch is a completely legit tool. :cool:

Unfortunately most specialists won't bother. People don't get it, what a poor standard of care COVID patients receive. Its just spO2 and a chest X-ray for COVID patients. They'd be lucky to have someone feed them or give them dring if they're too weak. On occasion they are too weak to ring the bell for help. There's no one to talk to. You're in a ward with people half-dead.
Interesting insight that you provide here. I didn't think things were that bad in Greece ; and it's probably not the country where it's the worse. In France they are duly fed, examinated, and commonly receive CT-scans. The problem is the available amounts of beds, since a lot of hospitals are close to saturation. :confused:

We'll have to be patient until the pandemic ends. Not literally of course. =p
 

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My office right now is 30m away from a COVID ward. I will not walk into there without my entire body covered in latex. And not in a sexy way.
Come on dude, we're supposed to be promoting abstinence here, and you go and get me all worked up here. :p
 

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So I want to back up here a moment.

Yes, you're absolutely right, nobody 'needs' a particular watch because they get into a certain hobby.

But at the end of the day, isn't watch collecting just another hobby? And as such, do we really need any justification to buy a watch beyond, "I want to have it in the collection."?

I know we're all for not buying watches here in this group, but surely none of us think that this mentality should be applied to the whole industry and the whole lot of watch collectors.

That would be a bit like the guy who smokes socially five or six days a week looking down on the guy who smokes a pack a day. It's a bit hypocritical to say, "you're allowed to like watches, but only if you don't have/buy more than X."

I want to make sure we're not losing the thread here. All well and good to bash each other's choices for being pointless, but when it comes to the industry as a whole, I can't condemn other people for wanting to collect watches or watch brands for making watches for them to collect. I do the same.

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Nothing wrong with others collecting watches, they can buy all they want, but in the context of this thread and not succumbing to the groupthink of buying/flipping ad nasuem we're within our rights to be pointing these things out.

I always struggle with calling this a hobby, especially when there's the constant churn from flipping and buying. If you had a collection of Seiko diver's from the decades or a collection of early digital watches then yes that sounds like a hobby, but what most of us are doing is just buying watches we like and then flipping them when bored.....
 

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Correct. However protocol doesn't allow palpation with naked hands. My office right now is 30m away from a COVID ward. I will not walk into there without my entire body covered in latex. And not in a sexy way. There is zero chance to check time with a wristwatch. You can do a neurological exam, an abdominal palpation/percussion (which is not all that precise as it may sound), check the thyroid and lymphatics, a lung percussion while wearing gloves.

Unfortunately most specialists won't bother. People don't get it, what a poor standard of care COVID patients receive. Its just spO2 and a chest X-ray for COVID patients. They'd be lucky to have someone feed them or give them dring if they're too weak. On occasion they are too weak to ring the bell for help. There's no one to talk to. You're in a ward with people half-dead.
The data has shown that spreading Covid via touch is extremely difficuly. It is a respiratory disease and is transmitted through droplets which need to be breathed in. I'm not aware of any proven instance where it was spread through touch (which would then have to be transmitted deep into your lungs).

As a healthcare worker we are focused on handwashing and the cleaning of instruments to prevent the spread of other diseases such as MRSA, but are not perfect. MRSA enters the body through the skin. We all need to do what we need to do to get through this but the best scientific advice I can give everyone is wear a mask and practice safe distancing (impossible during an exam) and wash YOUR hands before and after entering a physicians office, hospital, etc. That will cover 99.9% of the protection we all need.

FYI: I'm a critical care nurse and nursing supervisor who has been and is in direct contact with positive covid pstients.
 
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