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Not sure if this is the right place to post my Buren question, but some research suggests this electric watch I recently acquired was bought up by Hamilton, known for their own jump into early electrics. Not sure where the Buren appears in that line, before of after Hamilton, but any recommendation an early electric watch specialist would be appreciated.

When I first opened the case, the Buren had a dead Eveready 343 inside. I can‘t find a supplier for a 343, though I did see a suggestion that the 344 replaces the 343, essentially its equivalent. I ordered one and though it is identical in diameter, it’s thicker — 3.48mm vs 3.38 mm— but I did manage to get it under the harness clip and sadly, the watch didn’t start up. Not sure if it’s a battery size problem or another electrical issue.

As usual, WUS has been a valuable resource for me, and any information would be appreciated. I would love to get this Buren to run. It’s in excellent shape and the movement looks clean and spiffy !

if this posting would be better suited to a different thread, I thank the moderators For sending it there.

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It's an Electronic, not an Electric. This makes a difference. The movement marked as a Standard Time 683 is an ESA (Ebauches S.A.) 9154, a balance wheel electronic movement. It uses transistorised switching rather than the physical contacts of the earlier Hamilton Electric movements, (which were the first production battery-powered movements, introduced in 1957). These ESA movements are very good. The electronic switching afforded reliability and they were quite successful, being used by a large number of brands. The first of these ESA "Dynotron" electronic movements, the 9150, was introduced in 1967. The 9154 variant in this Buren watch was introduced in 1970. The Grade 683 is a Hamilton designation, Standard Time being a Hamilton subsidiary, and you'll find the same 683-marked movements used in Hamilton Electronic watches. Hamilton had acquired Buren in 1966.

The correct battery for the ESA 9154 is the 344 silver oxide cell (equivalents SR1136SW, SR1136, V344, 242, SR42). The 343 is a Mercury cell - these are no longer available in many countries due to environmental issues with the Mercury content. Make sure you have the 344 cell in the correct way around, "+" positive side up. Give the watch a solid tap on the side to see if the balance wheel can move.
 

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Thanks for the information about its history. I will try the new battery again, just for luck, because my tap on it the first time did not fire up the engine. This time I’ll close it up and wear it a little with occasional taps. See if that reminds the little Buren that it is a watch!
 
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