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The Omega speedmaster was the first watch to visit the moon.

What kind of watch is the perfect to be the first one to visit Mars? Maybe a g-shock. I believe that the Mars clock should be powered by one or two batteries, also a solar panel. Thinking about eco drive technology. Some kind of bullet proof and well tested tech.

What do you believe is the perfect Mars watch? I'm thinking eco-drive or gshock with solar.
 

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Technically, almost any modern watch would work.

But I'm sure Omega has already set a chunk of marketing budget aside to supply a manned Mars mission, if it ever happens. So something like the X-33 is likely.

While it is true that the Speedmaster was on the wrist of Astronauts whose feet touched the moon, it was not the first watch in orbit or the first watch in space outside a spacecraft. Gagarin wore a Pobeda. Scott Carpenter had a Breitling. Alexei Leonov wore a Poljot Strela when he exited his capsule for the first ever space walk. It's only after 1969 that Omega completely seized all the media attention regarding watches in space. Kudos to their marketing team.

Edit: so here are two contenders: Omega X-33 and Sturmanskie Mars Cosmonaut



 

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Matt Damon already wore a Hamilton
15491235


Apparently the BeLOWZERO(wth?) is in Tenet too. But it's a custom prop watch with a digital display.
 

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Solar for sure, but it would have to compensate by adding 37 minutes per day compared to our earth days. Also must be made of lightweight titanium.

OH, and it must have a GMT function so you can tell the time on another planet. I can hear the space craft pilot speaking softy into the intercom..."We'll be arriving slightly off time to sunny Mars, so stay strapped in folks and enjoy the fiery view of entry into your martian atmosphere!"
 

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It is an independent watch maker that will do it - the technology behind it :)
Easier things like tough solar and Ti case, they can fight over.

Cool read - I had come across this a while ago looking for unique watches.
 
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It is an independent watch maker that will do it - the technology behind it :)
Easier things like tough solar and Ti case, they can fight over.

Cool read - I had come across this a while ago looking for unique watches.
That's an amazing story, thanks for sharing!

Very true, the watch will certainly have time zones for both Mars and Earth, so more than one display will be needed. So a Konstantin Chaykin Mars Conqueror..?

 

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Someone has already mentioned the interesting fact that days on Mars are about 25 earth hours.

You're going to want a timepiece that can track Earth time AND local Mars time, something I'm pretty sure no watches can do at the moment. At the very least it will need to track sunrise and sunset which will be important when a bulk of power will come from solar.

It's going to be a lot easier to do that digitally than mechanically and I'm not sure there's a practical use for that back on earth.

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It's going to be a lot easier to do that digitally than mechanically and I'm not sure there's a practical use for that back on earth.
Interestingly, the way quartz watches and their circuits are built, they are just not very suitable for displaying any frequency that isn't their initial frequency divided by 2^x (usually 2^15 = 32768Hz is the initial quartz frequancy). So it's really easy to track a second 24h time zone with a quartz watch, since 24 = 12 x 2, or run a chronograph, etc. But a completely different frequency like a Mars day is surprisingly tricky. It would presumably be solved by just using a 2nd, independent quartz crystal and movement with a different base frequency. Not a big deal of course.

But just looking at the theoretical functioning of the movements, it is much easier to branch off some odd time frequency from a mechanical gear train than from a quartz crystal with its flip-flops.

For more on this, here is a brilliant video explaining how a quartz movement works, using flip-flops:

 

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Much as I hate to say this it will probably be some sort of smartwatch that syncs to NASA.
I came here to say this. Much like divers don't actually time their dives with a Rolex Submariner anymore, and instead use dive computers, astronauts will have the same thing.

That said, you know Omega will convince them to put a Speedmaster or something in the cargo hold, haha.
 

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Earth time would be of little use in Mars. There would be a +/-20 minute delay in anything happening between either planet.


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Do you mean on the surface of mars or in the habitats? G-Shock seems to be the popular choice inside space stations, but batteries are sensitive to the cold so they aren't worn in space. Kikuo Ibe is on record saying that he would like to design a G-Shock that would work outside the spacecraft, though.

Omega has a stranglehold on NASA, but I think the Fortis F2001 would be better suited to Mars. It's auto winding, which would work well since Mars has gravity. Plus it's a certified chronometer, and most importantly it has a mechanical alarm in addition to the chronograph to help keep track of activities. The cosmonauts have already been using it as their official watch for some time.
 

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Probably a Casio G-Shock or similar modern solar digital.

I hope choosing the right watch for the first Mars mission does not turn into just another stupid watch advertisement in where the company paid to have their watch used.

I would like to see trails and experiments done by scientists and engineers to prove what the best watch for Mars is.
 
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