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Holy sh#t...they actually sent one of these into orbit.



Jacob & Co., Bucherer Blue
If they can send old people with a lot of money up, it can't be that much out of Jacob & Co's piggy bank to send a watch, especially when you say it's for charity. With enough money, you can send all manner of rich kids to space. I'm sure the crew would rather deal with something that doesn't say stupid things along for the ride. Heck, this watch has gone where many toothbrushes have gone before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If they can send old people with a lot of money up, it can't be that much out of Jacob & Co's piggy bank to send a watch, especially when you say it's for charity. With enough money, you can send all manner of rich kids to space. I'm sure the crew would rather deal with something that doesn't say stupid things along for the ride. Heck, this watch has gone where many toothbrushes have gone before.
No doubt, but I think it's pretty impressive that delicate, tour de force of an astrolabe can survive a freakin' rocket launch regardless of the ticket price. They didn't float it up gently on a nice pretty sliver balloon (cough...Fortis...cough).
 

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I think it's pretty impressive that delicate, tour de force of an astrolabe can survive a freakin' rocket launch regardless of the ticket price.
I'm sure it wasn't bolted to the platform or in any way held so that it felt the bulk of the shock and vibration from the launch. It would be pretty easy to mitigate... even having someone just wear it would provide a lot of shock and vibe isolation. And you could isolate and cushion it a lot more than that if need be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm sure it wasn't bolted to the platform or in any way held so that it felt the bulk of the shock and vibration from the launch. It would be pretty easy to mitigate... even having someone just wear it would provide a lot of shock and vibe isolation. And you could isolate and cushion it a lot more than that if need be.
As were the Speedmasters on the wrists of Neil, Buzz, and Ed, and they're damn near worshipped. 7g is 7g, not to mention the noise...an intense vibration itself...and reentry's gotta be quite a ride.

I mean, look at the thing! I think it's one of the ugliest watches ever made, but sorry...it's an horological coup de maître
 

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The Earth in the watch is not synchronized to the face of the Earth below.
Also, the moon does not appear to the sculpted from actual moon rock.
Utter failure!
 

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Its definitely art in space.

Its probably one of the best pieces of art in space to date.

Here is other space art that's so bad, it makes sending the Jacob and Co. Astronomias to the ISS look like a good idea.


I think Jacob and Co. deserve a lot of credit for taking the space art thing seriously. That image of the Astronomias in space is probably one of the best watch images ever and I think they will win some awards in and out of the watch industry.
 

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It is... but they don't get anywhere near that in a human launch. Significant for the time they feel it, but not a ton. And the biggest issue for most mechanical objects is the vibration by far... but as mentioned, the watch won't really experience that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It is... but they don't get anywhere near that in a human launch. Significant for the time they feel it, but not a ton. And the biggest issue for most mechanical objects is the vibration by far... but as mentioned, the watch won't really experience that.
NASA tested a handful of watch brands for space travel, only the Omega survived, much less excelled. That suggests to me rocket launches are tough on watches.
 

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NASA tested a handful of watch brands for space travel, only the Omega survived, much less excelled. That suggests to me rocket launches are tough on watches.
To be fair, what killed most of the competitors, and almost also destroyed the Speedy, were simulations of temp and humidity fluctuations on the moons surface. Launches probably don’t get to -300 in the capsule, I hope.
 

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NASA tested a handful of watch brands for space travel, only the Omega survived, much less excelled. That suggests to me rocket launches are tough on watches.
A quick google tells me 4 brands provided watches. Rolex, Omega, Longines and Hamilton. Hamilton provided a pocket watch for whatever reason so they were out. Rolex and Longines failed temperature and / or relative humidity or decompression tests so they were out. The Omega passed but gained 21 minutes during the decompression test and lost 15 minutes during the acceleration tests and the luminous material on the dial was destroyed. It survived but timekeeping was lousy so I wouldn’t necessarily say it excelled.
 

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Or, the other watches they tested were just department store fare. I wonder if there are records of the failed watches? I’d be interested in seeing that.
"The NASA Watch Trials
A year after the launch of the Apollo Program, NASA started a search for a reliable timepiece to serve as the official watch of the space program. They began the process by putting out a request for proposals from a select few brands: Elgin, Benrus, Hamilton, Mido, Lucien Piccard, Omega, Bulova, Rolex, Longines-Wittnauer and Gruen. Only four of the ten brands answered the call — Omega, Longines-Wittnauer, Rolex and Hamilton. However, Hamilton presented a pocket watch, and was thus disqualified for not complying with NASA’s specifications. The other watches — the Rolex 6238 “pre-Daytona,” the Longines-Wittnauer 242T, and the Omega Speedmaster – were put through a rigorous series of tests. (Note: The 242T is the assumed reference that Longines-Wittnauer submitted, but this has yet to be confirmed.)"


From this article:

 
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"The NASA Watch Trials
A year after the launch of the Apollo Program, NASA started a search for a reliable timepiece to serve as the official watch of the space program. They began the process by putting out a request for proposals from a select few brands: Elgin, Benrus, Hamilton, Mido, Lucien Piccard, Omega, Bulova, Rolex, Longines-Wittnauer and Gruen. Only four of the ten brands answered the call — Omega, Longines-Wittnauer, Rolex and Hamilton. However, Hamilton presented a pocket watch, and was thus disqualified for not complying with NASA’s specifications. The other watches — the Rolex 6238 “pre-Daytona,” the Longines-Wittnauer 242T, and the Omega Speedmaster – were put through a rigorous series of tests. (Note: The 242T is the assumed reference that Longines-Wittnauer submitted, but this has yet to be confirmed.)"


From this article:

Yep same article I read and updated my post with some of the info.
 
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