WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,000 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,000 Posts
I think it's pretty impressive that delicate, tour de force of an astrolabe can survive a freakin' rocket launch regardless of the ticket price.
I'm sure it wasn't bolted to the platform or in any way held so that it felt the bulk of the shock and vibration from the launch. It would be pretty easy to mitigate... even having someone just wear it would provide a lot of shock and vibe isolation. And you could isolate and cushion it a lot more than that if need be.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,000 Posts
It is... but they don't get anywhere near that in a human launch. Significant for the time they feel it, but not a ton. And the biggest issue for most mechanical objects is the vibration by far... but as mentioned, the watch won't really experience that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,000 Posts
Or, the other watches they tested were just department store fare. I wonder if there are records of the failed watches? I’d be interested in seeing that.
"The NASA Watch Trials
A year after the launch of the Apollo Program, NASA started a search for a reliable timepiece to serve as the official watch of the space program. They began the process by putting out a request for proposals from a select few brands: Elgin, Benrus, Hamilton, Mido, Lucien Piccard, Omega, Bulova, Rolex, Longines-Wittnauer and Gruen. Only four of the ten brands answered the call — Omega, Longines-Wittnauer, Rolex and Hamilton. However, Hamilton presented a pocket watch, and was thus disqualified for not complying with NASA’s specifications. The other watches — the Rolex 6238 “pre-Daytona,” the Longines-Wittnauer 242T, and the Omega Speedmaster – were put through a rigorous series of tests. (Note: The 242T is the assumed reference that Longines-Wittnauer submitted, but this has yet to be confirmed.)"


From this article:

 
  • Like
Reactions: drdas007

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,000 Posts
Not to mention, it will likely be 6-figure priced.
The actual watch that went to space is being auctioned off for charity, so will probably go for much higher. The estimated price range is not given, but available on request per the auction page.


The MSRP on various versions of the watch seem to go from $600K to north of $1M... this seems to be one of the simpler ones without a lot of gems, so probably at the low end of that range.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top