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Anyone tells me that those use Sellita and ETA movement can get Cosc or only in-house movement ? Thank you.
Yes, these movements can be COSC certified, it just adds to the cost.
 

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I saw the several pictures of the both movements and they were identical to me. So you guys are basically arguing for the difference that most of you would not even able to detect, if there is any.

The only difference would be, one is a sunrise, while the other is a sunset. Maybe it's time for change of generation.
 

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Why, after all this time of its being used, are we still discussing the Sellita SW-200 movement? It's just as good and as capable, as are the other Sellita movements, as any ETA movement. For crying out loud, Sellita made movements for ETA for years.
 

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What engine do you think is in my 500M Aquaracer Chronograph? ETA or Sellita?

Watch Watch accessory Wrist Fashion accessory Strap

Would you be surprised if I told you I don't care? It runs at +1 spd. Whatever movement is in it you can't get much better than that.
 

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The same question could be asked about Oris when they were part of the Swatch Group.
Interestingly, prior to their Swatch takeover they made hundreds of their own movements. Then when they bought their independence back a condition was that they had to use ETA movements. Then obviously now Swatch has decided that even though they made Oris use them... now they won't be able to. So I guess Oris will.go back to what they used to do very well, make their own movements.


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My humble update as it happens to be my 2 most favorite watches each have a ETA 2824 and SW200 movement - my Sinn U1-T from 2016 has the SW200 movement and it only gains about 1 second off the wrist in a day and losses maybe .5-1 second a day on the wrist (my most accurate timekeeper). However, my WCT100 with the ETA2824 (elabore grade as I'm told) is an abysmal +24 seconds a day, but consistent no matter which position the watch is in. I know it really goes down to luck of the draw but my WCT1000 is not a gleaming example for ETA timekeeping - one of these days I'll get it regulated but for now I just deal with it.
 

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Interestingly, prior to their Swatch takeover they made hundreds of their own movements. Then when they bought their independence back a condition was that they had to use ETA movements. Then obviously now Swatch has decided that even though they made Oris use them... now they won't be able to. So I guess Oris will.go back to what they used to do very well, make their own movements.
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Well, Oris uses Sellita movements at the present. They have developed their own movement but it is available only in their higher tier models at the present.
 

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My humble update as it happens to be my 2 most favorite watches each have a ETA 2824 and SW200 movement - my Sinn U1-T from 2016 has the SW200 movement and it only gains about 1 second off the wrist in a day and losses maybe .5-1 second a day on the wrist (my most accurate timekeeper). However, my WCT100 with the ETA2824 (elabore grade as I'm told) is an abysmal +24 seconds a day, but consistent no matter which position the watch is in. I know it really goes down to luck of the draw but my WCT1000 is not a gleaming example for ETA timekeeping - one of these days I'll get it regulated but for now I just deal with it.
Great looking watches! I am a huge Sinn fan but have only owned the UX. The U1 is on my "someday" wish list.

If I can be honest, I love the fact that Sellita and Soprod have allowed independent watchmakers to flourish. Probably the best thing that ever happened was when ETA decided not to sell movements outside of the SWATCH group anymore. That decision forced European watchmaker, especially, to either start making their own in-house movements or source their movements from Sellita or Soprod. Yes, it was painful at first but, in the long run, it has proved to be a very successful situation for everyone.

For what it's worth, I've had ETA and Sellita movements that were excellent and I've had ETA and Sellita movements that were stinkers. Like I wrote above, I really don't know what is running my Aquaracer but, whatever it is, it's running at +1 second per day. I'll take that all day every day.
 

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Just to put in my .2 cents I have a Sinn U1 and a Tag Calibre 5, both use the SW200. Both of these are very consistent on my timegrapher @ +2 spd and +3 respectively. I have numerous ETA's and they all perform very close and in some cases not so close with the exception of the COSC ETA's in my collection. All of the SW200's I have ever owned have been extremely accurate and I have had zero problems with them. On the other hand I haven't really had any issue's with any of my ETA's either.
 

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Had an interesting chat with a guy who repairs Swiss watches for a living here in London (no names; no pack drill!); turns out that Sellita movements typically last about 18 months before breaking down, whereas ETAs fair much better. So much for the marketing hype and the extra jewel! In the wake of Swatch's decision to limit the supply of ETAs, looks like many watch manufacturers bought loads of Sellitas (before Swatch changed their minds!), so many 'upper end mid price' (if you'll pardon the term!) brands known for quality; Sinn for example, are putting these movements in their watches, and presumably will continue to do so until they've used up their stocks of Sellitas . . . Ouch!

This was divulged to me on taking in a new diver in in to have the (profoundly vital) crown tube gasket fitted that had been left off during assembly and not spotted during QC! Not saying the make 'cos it was done under warranty and I don't want anyone to get into trouble for speaking their mind!
 

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Had an interesting chat with a guy who repairs Swiss watches for a living here in London (no names; no pack drill!); turns out that Sellita movements typically last about 18 months before breaking down, whereas ETAs fair much better. So much for the marketing hype and the extra jewel! In the wake of Swatch's decision to limit the supply of ETAs, looks like many watch manufacturers bought loads of Sellitas (before Swatch changed their minds!), so many 'upper end mid price' (if you'll pardon the term!) brands known for quality; Sinn for example, are putting these movements in their watches, and presumably will continue to do so until they've used up their stocks of Sellitas . . . Ouch!

This was divulged to me on taking in a new diver in in to have the (profoundly vital) crown tube gasket fitted that had been left off during assembly and not spotted during QC! Not saying the make 'cos it was done under warranty and I don't want anyone to get into trouble for speaking their mind!
It wasn't a Sinn BTW
 

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Wasn't a Bell & Ross, a Zodiac, Eterna or an Ocean7 either. LOL 18 months? Have one that's 6 years old and still going strong without any issue. What facts does the Londoner Swiss watch repair give to support that Sellita moments don't last as long as ETA? Heck, even ETA contributors (Eterna) even use Sellita.
 

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Had an interesting chat with a guy who repairs Swiss watches for a living here in London (no names; no pack drill!); turns out that Sellita movements typically last about 18 months before breaking down, whereas ETAs fair much better. So much for the marketing hype and the extra jewel! In the wake of Swatch's decision to limit the supply of ETAs, looks like many watch manufacturers bought loads of Sellitas (before Swatch changed their minds!), so many 'upper end mid price' (if you'll pardon the term!) brands known for quality; Sinn for example, are putting these movements in their watches, and presumably will continue to do so until they've used up their stocks of Sellitas . . . Ouch!

This was divulged to me on taking in a new diver in in to have the (profoundly vital) crown tube gasket fitted that had been left off during assembly and not spotted during QC! Not saying the make 'cos it was done under warranty and I don't want anyone to get into trouble for speaking their mind!
Not my experience at all.

Don't think repair techs are incapable of jumping to conclusions based on a more limited sample than you might realize.

Rick "Sellita doesn't provide crown gaskets--that's the case maker's job" Denney
 

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Not my experience at all.

Don't think repair techs are incapable of jumping to conclusions based on a more limited sample than you might realize.

Rick "Sellita doesn't provide crown gaskets--that's the case maker's job" Denney
In fairness, unless you repair watches or are involved in the industry professionally, the likelihood is that he has been exposed to more Sellita and ETA movements than the average watch enthusiast . . .

If you do have direct professional knowledge, then fair enough
 

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Wasn't a Bell & Ross, a Zodiac, Eterna or an Ocean7 either. LOL 18 months? Have one that's 6 years old and still going strong without any issue. What facts does the Londoner Swiss watch repair give to support that Sellita moments don't last as long as ETA? Heck, even ETA contributors (Eterna) even use Sellita.
In his words, he sees about 10 Sellita ETS 2824 clones for every ETA 2824, that needs repair, as opposed to just coming in for a service
 

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In his words, he sees about 10 Sellita ETS 2824 clones for every ETA 2824, that needs repair, as opposed to just coming in for a service
We should remember that Sellita has sold their cheapest version of the SW200 to the cheapest brands, while the 2824 has been sold in much higher percentages in its more upscale versions to bigger companies with more extensive quality control. It wasn't until five or six years ago that luxury (non-Swatch Group) brands started buying Sellita movements in bulk.

My Sellita-equipped watches have required less repair than my ETA-equipped watches, but I don't own more than one or two watches with standard-grade movements. If a watchmaker has substantive data, we should be able to evaluate what has been going wrong, the relationship to watch-company price point and QC, and any trends over time.

Example: I have heard many American car mechanics of deep experience complain that Toyota and Honda use bolt sizes one size too small for any given task, compared to traditional American carmakers. I happen to hold that view myself, based on (professional) experience from so long ago that it is probably no longer relevant. But Toyotas are still undoubtedly more reliable than those other brands.

And some even deeply experienced mechanics will also have deep-seated opinions about Ford versus Chevy, based as much as anything on what their pappy liked, and will color their own experience with that bias.

There are lots of ETA movements that passed through the Sellita factory, when Sellita was doing mostly contract work for ETA. That doesn't make data any easier to interpret.

Rick "extrapolation causes a lot of Internet FUD" Denney
 

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I think it's important that this argument moves away from the Selita movement looking almost identical to ETA and that for most people being able to pick the difference type arguments.

More technical information on layman's terms should be used by those that know.

Why?
The arguments as they often are presented now could just as easily be used to support the purchase of game watches rather than the real Mccoy. If you can't see a perceivable difference, why buy the original?


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