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I read the first two pages, then jumped to the last page and read your summary. Boy am I glad I did!

Thank you for providing this summary.
 
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The opinion you have regarding a particular piece depends very much on where in the developmental timeline you read about it.

My understanding is that Sellita (not Setilla) was an official outsource manufacturer of ETA 2824-2 movements. Faced with the loss of their principal income stream they decided to market movements under their own name.

Initially concerned that an exact copy of a 2824 movement would be problematic, Sellita made some minor changes. Those changes, it turned out, diminished the performance of the movement.

But the situation changed. Informed that all the copyrights had expired on the 2824, Sellita began to manufacture movements which were, with one exception, exact copies of the venerable ETA. That exception?...Sellita added a 26th jewel to the barrel axis. The added jewel probably reduced the friction of automatic winding; but probably not enough to matter performancewise. My guess is that it's a move with future marketing in mind.

In sum, there is little, if any difference between the SW200 Sellita PRODUCES NOW, and the ETA 2824-2. Comparing images of them side by side they look identical. Anybody who tells you they are substantially different is probably working off old information.

Remember, Sellita built 2824-2 movements for a very long time. They probably know how.

CWORLD had a very good article on this subject.
 

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The opinion you have regarding a particular piece depends very much on where in the developmental timeline you read about it.

My understanding is that Sellita (not Setilla) was an official outsource manufacturer of ETA 2824-2 movements. Faced with the loss of their principal income stream they decided to market movements under their own name.

Initially concerned that an exact copy of a 2824 movement would be problematic, Sellita made some minor changes. Those changes, it turned out, diminished the performance of the movement.

But the situation changed. Informed that all the copyrights had expired on the 2824, Sellita began to manufacture movements which were, with one exception, exact copies of the venerable ETA. That exception?...Sellita added a 26th jewel to the barrel axis. The added jewel probably reduced the friction of automatic winding; but probably not enough to matter performancewise. My guess is that it's a move with future marketing in mind.

In sum, there is little, if any difference between the SW200 Sellita PRODUCES NOW, and the ETA 2824-2. Comparing images of them side by side they look identical. Anybody who tells you they are substantially different is probably working off old information.

Remember, Sellita built 2824-2 movements for a very long time. They probably know how.

CWORLD had a very good article on this subject.
Thank-you for this thread. I do have one question that I have not seen the answer to yet; what about longevity? One watch person I spoke with who is in the business stated that the movements are in fact near identical - component materials can vary however. He stated he was seeing the Sellita movements only last about 2-3 years and then they do not get foxed - they just get replaced - while the "work horse" ETA 2824 movements can and are serviced with "much" longer life.


I am interested to hear those with experience how they feel about their being a longevity difference - or if it is just Swiss conspiracy...
 

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Thank-you for this thread. I do have one question that I have not seen the answer to yet; what about longevity? One watch person I spoke with who is in the business stated that the movements are in fact near identical - component materials can vary however. He stated he was seeing the Sellita movements only last about 2-3 years and then they do not get foxed - they just get replaced - while the "work horse" ETA 2824 movements can and are serviced with "much" longer life.


I am interested to hear those with experience how they feel about their being a longevity difference - or if it is just Swiss conspiracy...
Very simple answer... Untrue.


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Thank-you Michael - when you say it is untrue - you are stating that longevity for the Sellita movements has been on par with the ETA movements in your experience or in what you have heard?
Both. They are virtually the same movement. Anyone starting differently had a vested interest or is plain wrong. It's a bit like the Seiko crowd who falsely believe a JDM version of a watch is better made.


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Discussion Starter · #168 ·
I don't have any experience owning a Sellita. All I can say is that my TAGs with ETA movements are true workhorses. And they are over 20 years old.
 

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Big fan of the Miyota 9000 series automatic 4k movements. I like Japanese watches, but Seiko isn't doing it for me lately. Would like a GS though : )

My two Miyotas run +1 & +2 seconds daily.
 

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Selita make a good movement. My Tag Autavia, Raymond Weil Freelancer, and Maurice Lacroix Aikon have it. All tell superb time and have given me 0 issues.
 
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