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Discussion Starter #1
Not the first as used to time trains, but the first American watch designed and marketed especially as a railroad watch. American Watch Co Crescent Street 1870 model. Waltham was still producing the old 1857 model when this 15j new top of the line 18s was introduced in 1870. Mine was made in 1872, it is key wind and set, bouth from the back. Adjusted to temperature and positions. Total production of the 1870 Crescent Street keywind was 9900, and the price was US$50 in 1870. The design differs from the older 1857, it looks more like the 1877 and 1879 models that would follow. This watch is in a coin silver recase and needs a clean.





 

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It looks like it may have it's original screws since they seem to match. Nice catch!
 

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Excellent piece, congratulations. I, also, find the hands quite attractive.
 

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Nice early key wind key set American Watch. I really like the regulator as well as those hands and numerals.
 

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I cannot think of any challengers in your well chosen category of designed and marketed for the earliest r.r. Nice to see the differences from subsequent same model. Is an 1874 nail set (push rather than pull lever) still a r.r.? I suppose so since original has no lever. Therefore then only U.S. r.r. watch not keywind and set without the traditional lever?

Just got your message for deleting. Thankyou.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just to add, the Crescent Street was the only grade Waltham produced in the 1870 model.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Art, yours is also a 1870 model Crescent Street, the hunter case/stem wind version. Both were watches used by railroads at the time this model came out. This was well before criteria for railroad standard watches were set. The Crescent Street was especially marketed by Waltham for use on railroad service.
 

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Very interesting early Walthams.

Eric, I notice that you have an 'Adjusted' movement, complete with
extra compensation screws to the balance whilst Arts movement is
probably 'Unadjusted'.
Was there any standard at all for a railroad watch at this early time
or could an employee use any old watch?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The early 1870ies was before criteria for standard watches (railroad time service) were set. The individual railroads started to establish their own standards in the eighties.
 

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Good observation by Radger as usual. So the adjusted k.w. might be r.r. acceptable in 1885 and unadjusted probably not, although both ok in 1874. I am a slow learner.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It is my understanding all 1870 Crescent St were adjusted. Art, the gray book lists yours to be adjusted as well.
 

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In that case I would suggest that Arts movement is adjusted to two or three positions and Erics watch to five or six positions.
I have seen watch movements marked one adjustment...I wonder how many 'adjustments' are necessary for a watch to be described as adjusted.

The escapements of these two watches are different, most apparant is the number
and dispersal of the compensation screws, if Erics balance wheel is carrying more
weight then the balance spring will also be a different strength, there could be
other hidden differences in the escapements but I'm only reporting what I can see.
 

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Erik nice watch :-! I like how you can set the time like a early Howard I have a civil war era Waltham model 1859 that you can use a key for changing the time on the back of the movement.
 
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