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Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know what ETA movements Zenith ever used? Well, there's the ETA 2892 (designated the Cal. 49.0), or the ETA 2671 (designated the Cal. 48.5). One of the rarer types was the ETA 2832, which even seems to puzzle Ranfft a little:

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&Zenith_2832&

In is text, he writes "The 2832 fits into the ETA numbering system, but it is unknown. As the ETA-number was removed, and 2832 was embossed on another place, this is probably an ETA 2828, upgraded to 36000 A/h by Zenith, rather than an ETA 2832 exclusively for Zenith. However, 1971-1977 an ETA 2826 with 36000 A/h was made, but without date display and with Incabloc." I should also add that the ETA 2832 is not listed in the new Zenith book calibre list - not is an ETA 2828 mentioned.

Is all this puzzling? Not much, really. What really puzzles me is that the new book's calibre list contains an entry on a Zenith Cal. 34.6 which was the ETA 2837. This ran at 36000 A/h and is not listed by Ranfft at all - and it is supposed to be a chronograph!! Its full specifications were: 11.5''', 5.05mm thick, automatic winding, 17 jewels, used in 1978, chronograph, day, date, stop second, central second hand. I have never seen one either in the flesh (well, metal, I suppose) or seen pictures on the internet.

In view of the evidence, I can only surmise that this movement was a modular construction, possibly based on the Cal. 2832. If it retained the central second hand, it may have had a chronograph subdial second hand, rather like some modern quartz chronos. If all specifications fit, it would challenge the El Primero's claim to "world's only ever chronograph running at 36000 A/h"!

Any ideas out there?!

Hartmut Richter
 

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An interesting little conundrum... could it be that it didn't make full production, or that it only ever ran 28800, and 36000 is a misprint?

In any event Hartmut, please let us know if you find anything that sheds more light.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
An interesting little conundrum... could it be that it didn't make full production, or that it only ever ran 28800, and 36000 is a misprint?

In any event Hartmut, please let us know if you find anything that sheds more light.

Paul
I have to admit that this is all I know! I ma not even sure whether to believe the whole thing!!

Picture the situation: it is the late seventies, you've just ceased production of your own movements but certainly have enough stock of in-house column wheel, integrated automatic chronograph movements to supply Ebel a few years later! Would you develop something modular based on an ETA movement?! Probably not. The only alternative is that it has already been developed for you (by ETA?!) and that it is available and a little thinner than your effort. If ETA developed the whole thing, why is it not found in other makers' chronographs?

My conclusion is that it is either a misprint (or misinformation somewhere along the line - not necessarily deliberate) or that this is a very basic prototype that didn't make it very far since it didn't really make much sense.

Still, if anyone else out there has better info, I am only to happy to learn and revise my knowledge/opinion.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the hint - I may well do that when I have some more time. Alternatively, a quick query to Zenith may do the trick.....

Hartmut Richter
 

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I've got two watches with 2837 movements in them. Both are day/date auto 36000bph watches. One is in a Titoni and the other is in a Mido. Both of these are mid 70s watches and are not marked as high frequency watches in any fashion. If these were used in chronographs, there must have been an attached timing module, as they are not integrated chronograph movements.

My pure speculation is that by the mid 70s, mechanical watch makers and particularly movement makers were under tremendous economic pressure and some high frequency movements were produced out of other base movements that were in over supply. These movements seemed to have gone to low-mid range producers. My guess is they went to them because they required small volumes of movements and that they were not labeled or marketed as high frequency, to conserve cash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many thanks for the info! It looks as if I'll have to write to Zenith for that one. Maybe the book just has a misprint, as far as the "chronograph" bit is concerned.....

Hartmut Richter
 

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Entirely possible, I suppose that some researcher or sub editor replaced chronometer with chronograph, not knowing the difference?
 
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