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I've been following quite a few of his auctions for the past few weeks. Some nice looking watches. I wouldn't be too turned off of a redialed Seiko if it is actually done well.

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I have no problem with a redial as long as it's well done and advertised as such.


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I believe it just means the dial was redone. Destroys resale value vs. unmolested originals, but makes the watch look shiny and new. If you are not planning to sell, can be great way to get a vintage watch with a new old stock look.
 

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Wow, that color, looks like a Bombay special.
 
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I was tempted to bid on one of his Grand Seikos. He's in Canada, so it meant saving on customs/import charges for me. Emailed them a few times with questions, and they were very quick to respond with good detailed answers. I think they're straight forward on what they do: take vintage watches and make them look brand new.

Ultimately, I didn't bid on anything because I want a vintage watch to look and feel like a vintage watch. I understand the appeal of a vintage watch that looks brand new, but just not for me.
 

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I was tempted to bid on one of his Grand Seikos. He's in Canada, so it meant saving on customs/import charges for me. Emailed them a few times with questions, and they were very quick to respond with good detailed answers. I think they're straight forward on what they do: take vintage watches and make them look brand new.

Ultimately, I didn't bid on anything because I want a vintage watch to look and feel like a vintage watch. I understand the appeal of a vintage watch that looks brand new, but just not for me.
It's interesting that we've had a cluster of posts about re-dialed watches in the last few days, mostly from new forum members. I sense that an appreciation of originality/age may be something that develops over time for most collectors, whereas people dipping their toe in the vintage collecting pool for the first time may feel that "like-new" condition is more desirable.

I think the issue of age/patina becomes particularly clear when one considers models where the design is virtually unchanged over time. The Omega Speedmaster would be a perfect example. At first glance, there is virtually no difference in the watch over the past 50 years. So if you are interested in a vintage model, wouldn't you want it to look old? Otherwise why not simply buy a new watch?
 

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I?m at the edge of a learning . So a redial is a copy ? Or they take the original watch an ?redo it ? .
Usually the original dial, but it's had the indices removed and has been repainted. When done well, it should be indistinguishable from the original, except, of course, that it looks "too good" for its age.


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It's interesting that we've had a cluster of posts about re-dialed watches in the last few days, mostly from new forum members. I sense that an appreciation of originality/age may be something that develops over time for most collectors, whereas people dipping their toe in the vintage collecting pool for the first time may feel that "like-new" condition is more desirable.

I think the issue of age/patina becomes particularly clear when one considers models where the design is virtually unchanged over time. The Omega Speedmaster would be a perfect example. At first glance, there is virtually no difference in the watch over the past 50 years. So if you are interested in a vintage model, wouldn't you want it to look old? Otherwise why not simply buy a new watch?
I go both ways on this. Some watches are more attractive to me because of their patina. In that case, it's *that particular watch* that I desire. In other cases, it's a certain model or reference that I want, so I'm happy buying an example in the best condition possible. If that's a redial, and it's done well and priced accordingly, I'm happy to go that route. I have vintage watches that look twice their age and I have vintage watches that look brand new. I enjoy them all.


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I was tempted to bid on one of his Grand Seikos. He's in Canada, so it meant saving on customs/import charges for me. Emailed them a few times with questions, and they were very quick to respond with good detailed answers. I think they're straight forward on what they do: take vintage watches and make them look brand new.

Ultimately, I didn't bid on anything because I want a vintage watch to look and feel like a vintage watch. I understand the appeal of a vintage watch that looks brand new, but just not for me.
I bought a watch from them a while back. I can't describe how impeccably done their restoration was. Dial, case, bracelet, crystal....everything was perfect and like new. No bad redial, no over-polished case, no rounded edges.




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I have one watch that I deliberately purchased in unacceptable condition for a good price and I had it restored to like-new condition, including the (necessary) use of some service parts. It's a ref 806 Breitling Navitimer, restored by Horological Services. They did an amazing job (not cheap) and I went into the process with my eyes open. At the time I liked it, but now I regret spending the money on it and wish that I had an honest vintage version. This was a good lesson for me, since it taught me some things about myself as a collector and watch owner ... what I value and what I want.
 

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Usually the original dial, but it's had the indices removed and has been repainted. When done well, it should be indistinguishable from the original, except, of course, that it looks "too good" for its age.


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This would be a “refinish”.

In times past, this was normal, accepted practice as part of a service. You’ll see some described as a “vintage refinish”, which can also develop a nice patina.
 

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I have one watch that I deliberately purchased in unacceptable condition for a good price and I had it restored to like-new condition, including the (necessary) use of some service parts. It's a ref 806 Breitling Navitimer, restored by Horological Services. They did an amazing job (not cheap) and I went into the process with my eyes open. At the time I liked it, but now I regret spending the money on it and with that I had an honest vintage version. This was a good lesson for me, since it taught me some things about myself as a collector and watch owner ... what I value and what I want.
I too have done this (more than once).

Got any before and after pics?

Here’s one of mine (actually after and before)...

While not a Breitling, I’m proud of having saved this piece from the horological dustbin of history...


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