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Moderator German Watches Forum
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Discussion Starter #1
One feature of having your watch coupled to the cellular network
is local time being frequently updated. The "watch" function tracks
the local time and updates from the network. Days like today when
the time changes in most of the US you don't need to do a reset.
Indeed the smart watch reminds you it is time to reset your
traditional clocks and watches to stay in sync with the world.


Thanks,
rationaltime
 

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Assuming the OS doesn't have a bug preventing a proper time update (happened just once or twice for some iPhone owners over the years, but it's happened).

Still, my AW was correct Sunday morning, while my two radio-synced quartz watches hadn't received a signal overnight and needed me to adjust them manually.
 

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Thatvl is a benefit of a watch slaved to a reliable network. Hope yo find out soon before the leep second hits.
Cellular networks aren't known for timekeeping reliability (as unbelievable as it sounds). Apple avoids them by maintaining its own internet-accessed time servers -- I think they have three around the world -- and references them to the atomic clocks.

This was an earlier thread; the linked article has a lot more detail:
http://forums.watchuseek.com/f586/apple-watch-accuracy-explained-detail-2725905.html
 

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Cellular networks aren't known for timekeeping reliability (as unbelievable as it sounds). Apple avoids them by maintaining its own internet-accessed time servers -- I think they have three around the world -- and references them to the atomic clocks.

This was an earlier thread; the linked article has a lot more detail:
http://forums.watchuseek.com/f586/apple-watch-accuracy-explained-detail-2725905.html
I did read that article when it came out. After I get my watch, I should be able to get an idea of its performance.
 

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You might be one to enjoy testing its performance purely in Airplane Mode for a while and see how well its internal timekeeping circuit performs.
But how long can you keep the watch in airplane mode before you start itching?

I keep my alarms on my phone so, I’d be annoyed tomorrow morning—though I suppose I could program my alarms on my watch instead of my phone. But for me, I would absolutely need my watch out of airplane mode with my next trip requiring Apple Maps and Pandora—in a few days.
 

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Moderator German Watches Forum
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Discussion Starter #9
Cellular networks aren't known for timekeeping reliability (as unbelievable as it sounds). Apple avoids them by maintaining its own internet-accessed time servers -- I think they have three around the world -- and references them to the atomic clocks.

This was an earlier thread; the linked article has a lot more detail:
http://forums.watchuseek.com/f586/apple-watch-accuracy-explained-detail-2725905.html
I have not read that cellular networks are unreliable. The frequency and
time on the network need to be carefully synchronized for data flow and
traffic hand off. The base station would go down if it loses sync with the
network. It would drop the calls. If a base station did go down it would
attempt to resynchronize. If you are not using the phone you wouldn't
even notice the interruption and neither would the phone's clock.

The network and the base stations are accurate enough for passing time to
cellular phones. I read that thread earlier. It occurred to me there are plenty
of public NTP servers, but maybe Apple wanted to avoid adding a noticeable
load to a public resource. Adding dedicated servers would not be expensive
compared to their other overhead.

It also occurred to me that NTP servers can log the requests they receive.
A cell phone request with serial number, base station ID, and time stamp
could be about 10 Bytes. Those Apple NTP servers could track the locations
of 100 million phones once an hour on about 25 GB/day. The cost is small,
and they don't have tell you about it or ask the cellular providers' permission.

Just something to think about.


Thanks,
rationaltime
 

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Actually Ron you can add to the answer. I was addressing the question is cell phone time pretty accurate. The Garmin is there just to show the atomic clock was accurate. I guess it also showed the Garmin is pretty good also.

Simply open Emerald time or the time on watchville on your iphone, put your AW next to it. You will see your network time, atomic clock and AW time.

I'm betting whatever network you're using it will be pretty good.
 

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Actually Ron you can add to the answer. I was addressing the question is cell phone time pretty accurate. The Garmin is there just to show the atomic clock was accurate. I guess it also showed the Garmin is pretty good also.

Simply open Emerald time or the time on watchville on your iphone, put your AW next to it. You will see your network time, atomic clock and AW time.

I'm betting whatever network you're using it will be pretty good.
I was going to use Emerald time on the Iphone but maybe a synch of the Fenix right before I was speculating on HAQ as to how long it would take to see an AW offset in airplane mode.
 

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Well you want to answer a different question Ron. Sync your Apple Watch with you phone than just put it beside your iPhone displaying emerald time. You will see your network time, atomic clock, and AW. If you want to look at the accuracy of a synced Fenix feel free.

You can answer how good your network is at time and you'll be able to start your TC study because you have a baseline.

Put your AW in airplane mode that will turn off all the wireless stuff.

Here is the important part, go to your phone settings and make sure your watch is not set to mirror your phone settings. You want to use your phone and just want your AW in airplane mode.

In 30 days if the AW moves about a second you're as good as most Certina's and Bulova's.

Hope you get to enjoy some of the AW features soon, you might like Apple Pay, messages, phone calls on your wrist, to name a few.
 

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Well you want to answer a different question Ron. Sync your Apple Watch with you phone than just put it beside your iPhone displaying emerald time. You will see your network time, atomic clock, and AW. If you want to look at the accuracy of a synced Fenix feel free.

You can answer how good your network is at time and you'll be able to start your TC study because you have a baseline.

Put your AW in airplane mode that will turn off all the wireless stuff.

Here is the important part, go to your phone settings and make sure your watch is not set to mirror your phone settings. You want to use your phone and just want your AW in airplane mode.

In 30 days if the AW moves about a second you're as good as most Certina's and Bulova's.

Hope you get to enjoy some of the AW features soon, you might like Apple Pay, messages, phone calls on your wrist, to name a few.
I am missing something. Bluetooth off on iPhone and airplane mode on watch. What does mirroring do under those conditions? If this is not enough, exactly which mirrorting flag check goes off?
 

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I am missing something. Bluetooth off on iPhone and airplane mode on watch. What does mirroring do under those conditions? If this is not enough, exactly which mirrorting flag check goes off?
Changing the iPhone mirroring setting won't matter. When the watch is in airplane mode, both the wifi and Bluetooth radios are off, and the phone won't be able to communicate with the watch even if it tried.
 

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As long as your watch is in airplane mode and not set to mirror your phone, you can use all the features on your phone including bluetooth. But if you want be safe you could leave bluetooth off on your phone. Gotta admit its been awhile since I played with the watch I gave my kid. I think the flags were in notifications and custom. Hopefully another member can confirm this.
 

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I was just thinking, I could try tracking my AW's non-connected timekeeping for a while. I can't wear it at work, plus I'm usually on my computer at home (I get all notifications, including texts, on the computer anyway) so I've been wearing my Rado more often instead.

Assuming that the Watch doesn't revert out of airplane mode when it's recharged, I could use it to track my workouts and stuff, too.

Surely it'll be better than my Garmin 410, which would forget what day it was if the battery ran down.
 

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I could be wrong but I thought the mirror feature allows you to pick the watch features you want to activate.

For example when your watch mirrors your iPhone, when you put your phone in airplane mode your watch goes into airplane mode. If you turn on wifi on your phone on the plane the wifi mode will go on your watch also all other feature will remain off.

I thought that's why it was important to make sure you set your mirror settings. The phone can talk to the watch even if the watch is in airplane mode if the mirror setting are on.

Do I have it wrong?
 
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