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I'm fascinated by the extreme divers that use Silicone oil on the inside. I undestand that they are all Quartz, and I understand why there are no automatics- the oil viscosity stops them from winding- but what about hand winding watches? Why can't there be one?
I know tipically dive watches aren't hand wound, because water would conceivably infiltrate the crown, even more so on an extreme diver, and in a oil filled one I'm willing to bet the results would be the same. Is there any other reason why a silicon oil filled diver can't be hand wound? Because for all purposes, the winding mechanism doesn't have to be a rotating crown. The Orient Mako has a button that rotates the date, that's a diver, so that button must be possible to make in extreme divers too, and the pumping action of a button can conceivably be used to wind a mechanism- in this case a watch.
Has anything like this ever been attempted? Is there any technical reason that makes it impossible?
I have some more ideas on how to make a non quartz oil filled extreme diver, but English isn't my first language and first I want to try and explain this idea before elaborating on more complex ones...

I have a feeling that this should be on the watchmaker section, but first I'd like to see input from divers, Thanks
 

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The balance and escapement trying to beat at 18000-36000bph probably doesn't do well in a silicone oil environment. Which is the same reason an automatic doesn't work, not the rotor--the rotor moves relatively slow, so its movement isn't impeded as much by the oil. You might be able to compensate for the slow down of the balance by using a higher beat balance with lower beat gearing, but you'd have to figure it out. But the main problem would come from requiring more power to push through the oil, thus the power reserve would suffer immensely.

You'd do better to try and design a watch that needs to be pumped up to 20 bar inside.

-s-
 

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The balance and escapement trying to beat at 18000-36000bph probably doesn't do well in a silicone oil environment. Which is the same reason an automatic doesn't work, not the rotor--the rotor moves relatively slow, so its movement isn't impeded as much by the oil. You might be able to compensate for the slow down of the balance by using a higher beat balance with lower beat gearing, but you'd have to figure it out. But the main problem would come from requiring more power to push through the oil, thus the power reserve would suffer immensely.

You'd do better to try and design a watch that needs to be pumped up to 20 bar inside.

-s-
Also, the viscosity of the silicone oil would probably vary not inconsiderably (probably really quite a lot) making temperature variation v. hard to deal with - much more so than usual :think:
 

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I'm fascinated by the extreme divers that use Silicone oil on the inside. I undestand that they are all Quartz, and I understand why there are no automatics- the oil viscosity stops them from winding- but what about hand winding watches? Why can't there be one?
I know tipically dive watches aren't hand wound, because water would conceivably infiltrate the crown, even more so on an extreme diver, and in a oil filled one I'm willing to bet the results would be the same. Is there any other reason why a silicon oil filled diver can't be hand wound? Because for all purposes, the winding mechanism doesn't have to be a rotating crown. The Orient Mako has a button that rotates the date, that's a diver, so that button must be possible to make in extreme divers too, and the pumping action of a button can conceivably be used to wind a mechanism- in this case a watch.
Has anything like this ever been attempted? Is there any technical reason that makes it impossible?
I have some more ideas on how to make a non quartz oil filled extreme diver, but English isn't my first language and first I want to try and explain this idea before elaborating on more complex ones...

I have a feeling that this should be on the watchmaker section, but first I'd like to see input from divers, Thanks
A mechanical watch movement - hand-wound or automatic - simply will not work in any medium other than air (gas).

Time to spend those brain cells figuring out a different project :-!
 

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i dont see any reason why would someone buy a silicone filled watch? For WR? You need 15.000m of WR?
The only positive thing would be resistance to extreme cold...if the silicone oil can handle that
 

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i dont see any reason why would someone buy a silicone filled watch? For WR? You need 15.000m of WR?
The only positive thing would be resistance to extreme cold...if the silicone oil can handle that
I think the best part of oil is being able to read the dial at extreme angles. It would be cool if they could fill up the dial area and leave the auto movement dry, it would be very hard and the only benefit would be legibility.
 

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I think the best part of oil is being able to read the dial at extreme angles. It would be cool if they could fill up the dial area and leave the auto movement dry, it would be very hard and the only benefit would be legibility.


Halifax is right, legibility seems to be the only plus for oil filled watches. I like the idea of oil filled from an engineering perspective, but I can't see a reason for it in real-world diving applications.

Even in the legibility dept., when viewed at an angle(oil filled), the hands are still obscured in relation to the bezel. The optimal way to read elapsed time underwater is to look straight down onto the face of the watch. When viewed this way, the results are the same for air filled or oil filled.
 

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It is COOL to have a Silicone filled, WR 15000m watch!

Do we need a WR of more than 100m?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi guys, thanks for your imput. In fact nobody really needs a deep dive watch, anything over 1000m is for show only. But there's something irresistable about an overengineered watch, like the 20.000ft CX for example ( I mention it because it's the one that goes deepest and doesn't need oil to do so). And of all the extreme divers out there, the ones I find particularly intriguing are the ones filled with silicone oil. I find them intriguing because there is a clear limitation- quartz only- and it is in my nature to try and find solutions to problems. If it didn't have such a limitation, I probably wouldn't think twice about it.

I'm no watch designer, mind you, but in my experience, all problems have a solution. So in a pure mental exercise I was trying to figure out a way of doing a mechanical silicone oil filled watch.
Thank you Skoochy and RTH for providing me with the dificulties of such endeavour. Now I have something to mull over the next time I'm stuck in traffic :)
 

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There is no point of making Diving watches to extreme depths 5, 10 and more times the depth that Divers will ever go to. It is all marketing driven without practical purpose. A depth rating 2 or 3 times the maximum depth ever attained by a Diver gives a safety factor that is very acceptable and would easily serve any Diver in any situation. In my opinion anything rated over 5,000 feet / 1500 meters is a joke. They make me giggle.
 
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