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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Grandfather was my best friend, second Father, perfect role model and so much more all in the nicest package God could ever have made. He fought in Burma during WWII and spend a large amount of time as a POW in the most terrible conditions. He was one of the few lucky enough to return from the hell and was the kindest, most understanding and gentle man I knew. He's been gone several years now but I'll never ever forget him.

As I wear a poppy, the great memories flood back. Here's a toast to you Grandad. And a toast to all those who made sacrifices large and small in any conflict so we may enjoy our freedom today.

Gentlemen, raise your glass please...
 

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I will raise my glass to that most elegant of toasts. My Grandfather spent WWII with the Mighty 8th in England, he was B-17 tailgunner. God bless those who fight for our freedoms, and those that gave all.

Chris
 

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Re: To my Father & Grandfather...

My Grandfather - WWI US Navy Submarine corp



My Father WWII Capt. US Army Medical Corp

Field Hospital



His beat up Bulova


Decorated Zippo




The last book he read, Col Hackworth's Hazardous Duty



Hack's Inscription to my father

 

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My grand-grand father Ernest, who fought in WWI - 14ème Régiment d'Infanterie...



I raise up my glass to all these courageous men facing their duty.
Lest we forget.

Cheers,
Brice
 

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Here is a picture of my Grandfather who served in France during WWI.
He was taken prisoner in 1918 after the battle for Travecy Keep.

http://www.1914-1918.net/BATTLES/incident_21Mar18_travecy.htm



My dad also has an old English penny coin with a german bullet stuck in it.
The coin was in my Granfather's trouser pocket when the bullet hit and almost certainly saved his leg.

(I could post a pic of it if anyones interested.)

I wear my poppy with pride every year, and have the utmost respect and gratitude for all our servicemen/women.

Nick
 

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I was really inspired reading this thread. The history and sacrifice of the fathers and grandfathers and great-grandfathers in your memorials to heroes from days gone by was really heartwarming.

Where indeed did we find such men? May we never lose our respect for those who put on the uniform and stand on the line.
 

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My grandfather (marked with the X) circa 1908. He was 60 years old when I was born, probably around 18 when this picture was taken. I think KOYLI is short for Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He taught me how to draw and took me to all the museums, art gallerys, and botanical gardens where he lived in Cambridge. He spent a career with British Rail and was once the youngest foreman with British Rail. I loved it when he took me on the trains and I still have the letters he wrote me when I was a child. Gone but certainly not forgotten.

Paul

 

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This thread has a fantastic sentiment. My grandfather fled Poland at the outbreak of WWII via Africa and into Glasgow. In the short period he was in Glasgow he met my gran. He was then stationed in RAF Swinderby in England away from my gran but they continued to write to each other. On a night sortie over Bremen in June 1941 his Wellington Bomber was shot down and he spent the rest of the war being moved between Stalags as he had escaped twice. After the war he met up with my gran and they got married. He then spent years as a political pawn, not being able to go back to Poland because of the Ruskies and being treated as a second class citizen in the country he had fought hard to defend. After trying Argentina they finally settled back in Glasgow.

I have so many memories of my dearest Dziadek and fortunately my three young sons have as well. He was my hero as I grew up but he never told all his stories. They were left as memories with his friends.

Sgt Mieczyslaw Hasinski
301 Bomber Squadron
 

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To add to the growing list of heroes on this thread....


My Uncle John who was seconded to the Royal Canadian Airforce:-
He Died over Germany on the 3rd of February 1945 aged 21.



Sergeant John McAfee

Sergeant John McAfee served in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Service Number 1037806. He died on 3rd February 1945, age 21. Cemetery/Memorial Name: Rheinberg War Cemetery, Grave/Memorial Ref: Coll. grave 8. D. 22-24. A marble tablet in memory of Mr McAfee and three other members of the congregation killed during the 1939 – 1945 was unveiled in Railway Street Presbyterian Church, Lisburn, Northern Ireland, at the Armistice Day Service on 6th November 1955.

LEST WE FORGET THEM ALL.

Verner
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It's fantastic to see such wonderful contributions to the thread gents. It's great that each and every one of these heroes has left such lasting warm memories in our hearts.

Mark
 

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Already so many great pictures and stories on this thread so may I add one more. Some of you may remember a thread I entered several months back about my Dad's cousin, John Laird, who I'd done some research on and discovered so much more than existed in the 'family memory'. At the time I'd managed to find a picture of his crew on the web but recently Dad found some photos we thought had been lost. With the miracle of home scanners/printers those small pics are now preserved and enlarged and through my researches I'm in contact with the son of one other member of the crew and some other researchers/relatives.

So when I'm raising my glass to the brave men on this page, and to all of those that have worn the flag on their arm past and present, I shall also remember the crew of RCAF Halifax QB-M of 424 Sqdn, which came down on 23 April 1944 with the loss of John Laird, L Walters, W Vornbrock, F Cammaart, L Hanson, and J Renning, and F Morrisey who survived and was taken POW.

Lest We Forget - Rest In Peace





 

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My Dad gained his citizenship by fighting in Korea at age 17. I attended the US Military Academy and survived my time and my Nephew will be heading out soon for his third tour (two combat tours before age 21).

Many of my classmates have lost their lives and one in particular left a high paying Wall Street job after 9/11 and headed to Afghanistan with the Special Forces.

Thank you for this wonderful post. We need to appreciate all those who have served from around the world in the fight for freedom.
 
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