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I see no real pattern for which batteries die and which survive.

I had to exchange the battery in a GW-225 after 10 years (that i only wear once every few weeks).
Another GW-200 of the same age and use is still strong
And several GW-M5600s in much heavier rotation, at the same age and with smaller batteries are still doing fine.
The oldest GW-500 i own needed a new battery after 15 years or so and so is the oldest solar G in my pile.

This is a thread I started last year related this issue:

https://www.watchuseek.com/f17/gw-m5610-light-problem-5023707.html

The watch is still showing a high charge and exhibiting the same occasional problem.

It occurred to me that maybe the way a watch is used could have an impact on solar battery life.

The problem with mine occurred after I had been using it every day for four years straight including several times daily use of the EL, hourly chime etc, continually charging and draining. I guess most G's here are part of a collection and unlikely to see the same pattern of use, arguably equivalent to 8-10 years wear if worn 2-3 times per week and spending the rest of the time asleep in PS or perhaps sitting on a sunny window sill. I wonder if battery problems are seen more in watches in constant use?
 

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Moderator G-Shock Forum
Joined
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6,319 Posts
I see no real pattern for which batteries die and which survive.

I had to exchange the battery in a GW-225 after 10 years (that i only wear once every few weeks).
Another GW-200 of the same age and use is still strong
And several GW-M5600s in much heavier rotation, at the same age and with smaller batteries are still doing fine.
The oldest GW-500 i own needed a new battery after 15 years or so and so is the oldest solar G in my pile.

This is a thread I started last year related this issue:

https://www.watchuseek.com/f17/gw-m5610-light-problem-5023707.html

The watch is still showing a high charge and exhibiting the same occasional problem.

It occurred to me that maybe the way a watch is used could have an impact on solar battery life.

The problem with mine occurred after I had been using it every day for four years straight including several times daily use of the EL, hourly chime etc, continually charging and draining. I guess most G's here are part of a collection and unlikely to see the same pattern of use, arguably equivalent to 8-10 years wear if worn 2-3 times per week and spending the rest of the time asleep in PS or perhaps sitting on a sunny window sill. I wonder if battery problems are seen more in watches in constant use?
 

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It just occurred to me that the GW M5600 that I bought in 2009 and my partner has worn pretty much every day for 7-8 years is still absolutely fine. I asked her and she said she uses the light several times per night, no pattern emerging here either.
 

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Fixed the pic links^^^

Some of these are now 22 years old, on original battery, still holding full charge.

Still have never changed a solar watch battery.
Are all of these G's you own enjoying their original resin cases if I may ask?
 

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Fun fact, around these parts anyway.
I went to an official Casio store and asked what it would cost to replace a battery in two watches. One without solar and one with solar (non-rechargeable vs rechargeable) ...

Non-rechargeable : 12 bucks.
Rechargeable: 80 bucks. Holy ****.
 

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Fun fact, around these parts anyway.
I went to an official Casio store and asked what it would cost to replace a battery in two watches. One without solar and one with solar (non-rechargeable vs rechargeable) ...

Non-rechargeable : 12 bucks.
Rechargeable: 80 bucks. Holy ****.
Get yourself a screwdriver and buy the battery on Amazon for $17.

 

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Samsung Gear S3 Frontier. Casio G-Shock DW-6900SG. Casio G-Shock GW-5000. Rado Original R12408614.
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Fun fact, around these parts anyway.
I went to an official Casio store and asked what it would cost to replace a battery in two watches. One without solar and one with solar (non-rechargeable vs rechargeable) ...

Non-rechargeable : 12 bucks.
Rechargeable: 80 bucks. Holy ****.
I think $12 for a non-solar is still expensive.

Would be a lot cheaper to replace by yourself, if that's the case.
 

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Samsung Gear S3 Frontier. Casio G-Shock DW-6900SG. Casio G-Shock GW-5000. Rado Original R12408614.
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1,771 Posts
Good to hear these batteries last awhile.
Yes it does last longer than suggested.

My 6900 is still running on its original battery since 2013.
 

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The batteries used by Casio are usually based on cobalt titanium lithium batteries (CTLxxx), these are used because they are fairly robust and really work best when constantly full and constantly topped up as would happen with a solar watch worn everyday. Typical life times quoted vary between manufacturer but can be as low as 100 full charge/discharge cycles, but up to 1000 charges if only discharged by about 20% before being recharged. The life-time of the cell is considered up when its capacity has dropped to about 80% of what it was new, so it continues working fine in a watch well after that 1000 specified charge cycles as a solar watch only needs a fraction of the batteries capacity each day to bridge periods of darkness, assuming each day it receives enough light to replenish what was spent. What will become more noticeable with age is the shortening time of how long the watch continues to run when it's shut away in a drawer or doesn't get enough light during each day to replenish what is used.

Factor in the variability between batches of cells, some will come from better batches and last longer, others may age sooner and suddenly fail, then differences in how the owner uses the watch and what sort of discharge and recharge cycles they subject the watch to means we can all have a completely different experience of the battery life.
 
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