WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 60 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I needed a tough watch that didn't need any maintenance, and that also looked bad-ass. So last September, I went for the GW2310FB-1CR (Tough Solar + Multi-Band 6), imported one from the US and shipped it to my country (the Netherlands).

The watch is just perfect. It looks awesome, is sturdy. The negative display is very readable. The multiband time sync works perfectly, even with the DST switch we had recently. Doesn't even need to be near a window.

But the Tough Solar has some issues. When I just got the watch, the indicator was on "High". It dropped to "Medium" the day after, never to recover. Now that winter is coming, that is becoming an issue. It frequently drops to "Low", which disables the beeper and the illuminator. And because this has a negative display, not having the illuminator makes it impossible to use at night.

The manual states that I need to roll up my sleeves, but that's somewhat impractical when I'm outside and it's freezing. And it's also impractical when I'm inside wearing a thick sweater, so I usually take the watch off and put it near a window. But we only have 8 hours of sunlight a day, and behind a double or triple pane window it doesn't get enough sunlight to get back up to "Medium" let alone "High".

Auto-EL is disabled and PowerSaver is enabled. Do I live in the wrong climate from Tough Solar? Because taking the watch to the shop every three years for a battery replacement is way less of a hassle than constantly rolling up my sleeves and taking it off to put it next to a window.

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I would leave it on your window sill for a few days to give it an initial boost. It was likely sitting in a box before it got to you; the HIGH was probably at the very low end. I wouldn't worry about it, you just need to give it a kick start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,835 Posts
What you really need to do is put it on the window shelf when the sun will be out. Leave it on sun for some time to get on H and that's it....

It's not really that much of a hassle as you think. You just need to fully charge it, when it's fully charged you just need to give it enough light during the day to stay on H, which isn't that much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply.

I've placed the watch behind the window sill for the last couple of months, and it was enough to keep it at "Medium" in September - November, but it now dips to "Low".

I do remember that on the second day of ownership, when it went from "High" to "Medium", I put it on the window sill and it went back to "High", but only temporarily (something that the manual states as normal behavior). This was on a very sunny day. Could I have damaged the battery by doing this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
I have Ikea LED lamp and with it I can give some juice to my watch. Went from M to H instantly and has been there now. Unfortunately around this time of the year the day is about 5h20min long and during the raining we dont see much of the sun, so artificial light is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
936 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies. I bought the watch in September, so it didn't have all sumer to charge and prepare for fall/winter. I'll see what happens next year. Luckily, I have many other amazing Casio watches I can wear for the winter (A168 and I will soon receive the F-91W "Osama Special").
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
I've too some Tough Solar lights, and having no problems. I only had two times, it hit medium. Just a few days in front of a window should do the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
When I just got the watch, the indicator was on "High". It dropped to "Medium" the day after, never to recover. Now that winter is coming, that is becoming an issue. It frequently drops to "Low", which disables the beeper and the illuminator. And because this has a negative display, not having the illuminator makes it impossible to use at night.

The manual states that I need to roll up my sleeves, but that's somewhat impractical when I'm outside and it's freezing. And it's also impractical when I'm inside wearing a thick sweater, so I usually take the watch off and put it near a window. But we only have 8 hours of sunlight a day, and behind a double or triple pane window it doesn't get enough sunlight to get back up to "Medium" let alone "High".

Auto-EL is disabled and PowerSaver is enabled. Do I live in the wrong climate from Tough Solar? Because taking the watch to the shop every three years for a battery replacement is way less of a hassle than constantly rolling up my sleeves and taking it off to put it next to a window.
It sounds to me like you live near the northern edge of "wrong climate for Tough Solar" -- a lot of members from your sort-of neighbors in the UK have reported similar issues.

One of the problems is that it sounds like your watch has never been fully charged since you've owned it. Even when your watch briefly went to a "High" charge, it was still several hours away from being "fully charged," as the chart below shows:

2310 charging.JPG

It could have still used six hours of DIRECT sunlight, or another three days' worth of sunlight through the window to reach "Full."

The good news is that even though it takes these watches a while to become fully charged, it also takes them a while to discharge back to "Medium." I'm located a little closer to the equator than you, but we still get regular snow and 9 hour "days" of sunlight. I try to make sure that my solars are all on "High" as autumn rolls around, and about half of them will stay on "High" until spring. By January or February, a few will drop to "Medium" and I'll put them outside on one of our sunny days, they'll bounce back to "High" and stay there until spring.

As far north as you are, it's also extremely unlikely that you damaged your watch by putting it on a windowsill behind a double- or triple-paned window. :)

My suggestion is more or less what you've come up with already: you can try to charge your watch for several days on the windowsill, or else just pick another watch until spring and then try to make sure you go into November '14 with your 2310 on "High!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
794 Posts
I just had my first tough solar (G6900) a few days ago and I received it only having a mid charge. It took me some time to fully charge it under the Manila Sun. I was lucky enough to have strong sunlight during that time though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,166 Posts
Hello,
I have been using solar watches since 1986... (my very first has been a analogic all plastic 100% solar watch, that I cant figure the name)
I have been the proud owner of a Roger Riehl Synchronar in 1996 and then in 1998, I was in love with a Raysman.

Using a solar watch needs some kind of opportunism. I see my self orienting my watch to the sun on a daily basis: while driving, hand on the wheel, while walking having my watch out of my sleeve, even if it is cold (then it goes over my glove...).
In the winter time, indoors, if I see some sun, I will spot a ray and place the watch in it.
My Rangeman was on Medium two weeks ago, and since, even in those Winter's solstice days, I was able to have it on High and stay on High.
(I have changed the LED time from 3 to 1.5 seconds, this was the main battery killer)

Chasing the sun is fun when you know this is powering your watch. I love to be part of that "perpetual movement".
So be aware, be opportunist and you should be able to charge your watch through the winter. Use the backlight wisely and it should be OK.

Ask some Dutch collectors like Sjors how he copes with all his huge collection ! :)

Cheers
nemo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
Thanks for the reply.

I've placed the watch behind the window sill for the last couple of months, and it was enough to keep it at "Medium" in September - November, but it now dips to "Low".

I do remember that on the second day of ownership, when it went from "High" to "Medium", I put it on the window sill and it went back to "High", but only temporarily (something that the manual states as normal behavior). This was on a very sunny day. Could I have damaged the battery by doing this?
Hi, I'm also from the Netherlands.

When the watch gets hot the display will go black. September didn't have really hot days so I highly doubt you damaged your watch or battery.
When charging in the summer I leave it in a window facing east so it only gets direct sunlight when the sun is much less hot.

I noticed my solar watch(es) also sometimes give a higher reading when they are charging but drop back to the previous level when they stop charging, like yours did.

I have not worn the same solar watch whole year round but have started wearing the same watch for a few months now and it is still on high.
I think it's possible to get through autumn and winter if you pre charge the watch during spring and summer (by just wearing it and by leaving it on a window sill for two weeks after it gives a "high" reading in summer) so it can last during the autumn and winter.

Your problem is two fold. You did receive your watch in September so not much sunlight days left to charge it.
You received your watch on the medium level; and I suspect on the very low part of medium since it dropped to low already.

What I would do if I was you?
Leave it at the window which gets the most sunlight untill it reaches high level (could take months now) and wear a different watch or no watch in the mean time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
[...]Do I live in the wrong climate from Tough Solar?[...]
Considering yesterday (the Winter Solstice) you guys got...what? Five and half hours of daylight? Assuming it was clear out, and you were outside, it would still take five hours in BRIGHT sunlight to go from Medium to High, according to the Casio manual. :think:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
Assuming it was clear out, and you were outside, it would still take five hours in BRIGHT sunlight to go from Medium to High, according to the Casio manual. :think:
Which manual are you referencing? The charts in the manuals vary slightly between models, and I can't find "5 hours" anywhere on the chart from the GW-2310 manual I posted on page 1 of this thread.

Based on that chart, it will take 22 hours to go from "just got to stage 2" (Medium) to "just got to stage 1" (High) and another six hours to go from there to "fully charged."

Here's the chart from the previous page in the manual, explaining the various charge states:

charge states.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Hi guys,

I needed a tough watch that didn't need any maintenance, and that also looked bad-ass. So last September, I went for the GW2310FB-1CR (Tough Solar + Multi-Band 6), imported one from the US and shipped it to my country (the Netherlands).

The watch is just perfect. It looks awesome, is sturdy. The negative display is very readable. The multiband time sync works perfectly, even with the DST switch we had recently. Doesn't even need to be near a window.

But the Tough Solar has some issues. When I just got the watch, the indicator was on "High". It dropped to "Medium" the day after, never to recover. Now that winter is coming, that is becoming an issue. It frequently drops to "Low", which disables the beeper and the illuminator. And because this has a negative display, not having the illuminator makes it impossible to use at night.

The manual states that I need to roll up my sleeves, but that's somewhat impractical when I'm outside and it's freezing. And it's also impractical when I'm inside wearing a thick sweater, so I usually take the watch off and put it near a window. But we only have 8 hours of sunlight a day, and behind a double or triple pane window it doesn't get enough sunlight to get back up to "Medium" let alone "High".

Auto-EL is disabled and PowerSaver is enabled. Do I live in the wrong climate from Tough Solar? Because taking the watch to the shop every three years for a battery replacement is way less of a hassle than constantly rolling up my sleeves and taking it off to put it next to a window.

Thanks in advance!
U have to make sure its really high. It happened to me too, when the watch reach high, I use it for a short while, auto light, timer, etc, and right away it goes down to medium. So, I do some reading at this forum, I think someone mentioned u have to get the watch to high-high, not low-high. When it easily drop from high to medium, thats low-high. So instead of 3 hours of charging, I push it for another 3-5 hours. And now my watch stay at high all the time, np.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Which manual are you referencing? The charts in the manuals vary slightly between models, and I can't find "5 hours" anywhere on the chart from the GW-2310 manual I posted on page 1 of this thread.

Based on that chart, it will take 22 hours to go from "just got to stage 2" (Medium) to "just got to stage 1" (High) and another six hours to go from there to "fully charged."

Here's the chart from the previous page in the manual, explaining the various charge states:

View attachment 1320773
Sorry, I was referencing the manual from a GW-6900, as it turns out. :-( Obviously, other models will vary, given the different sizes of the solar cells, even if the underlying hardware is the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,784 Posts
So, I do some reading at this forum, I think someone mentioned u have to get the watch to high-high, not low-high. When it easily drop from high to medium, thats low-high. So instead of 3 hours of charging, I push it for another 3-5 hours.
Exactly -- I often compare these solar cells to a car's gas tank where the needle doesn't swing off "Full" for the first few miles! :) If you drive for 10 miles, you know it's not REALLY "full" anymore, but it's still mostly full, and it's sure not down to "1/2" that soon.

Sorry, I was referencing the manual from a GW-6900, as it turns out. :-( Obviously, other models will vary, given the different sizes of the solar cells, even if the underlying hardware is the same.
With every one of my solar G's having a different chart, I've thought the same thing. It's kind of amazing to realize that each watch's solar cells all take up less than one square centimeter, but can power a watch for months at a time! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
I have pretty much all tough solars for my Casios, except for the DW290 Mission Impossible 1 watch. Once they are charged to H, they seldom go down to M or below. We have almost 5.5 months of Winter here, so days with daylight is rare during those months.

However, I normally put my tough solars on a window sill when I get home. And they get approximately an hour of early morning light on them every day. I find that this is enough. Whatever shortfall there is will have to wait until the Spring and Summer months.
 
1 - 20 of 60 Posts
Top