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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry, noob here. I've got a lovely Swiss 6497-1 that I want to install in a case, but before I do so I'm practicing with a cheap Chinese 6497-1 clone. Following some online instruction (there's far less than I thought there would be) I removed the stem, however I cannot not put it back in. One of the little bars had become misaligned, so I took the stem-related parts out, and put it all back together. However, the stem still won't go in very far, and I noticed that the little bar that is pushed forward when the stem is pulled out (to set the watch) is moving freely (sorry, I can't remember the name). Here's a photo I took with my digital microscope:
barMovingFreely.jpg

Any thoughts on what I'm doing wrong here?

Thanks!
 

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Sorry, noob here. I've got a lovely Swiss 6497-1 that I want to install in a case, but before I do so I'm practicing with a cheap Chinese 6497-1 clone. Following some online instruction (there's far less than I thought there would be) I removed the stem, however I cannot not put it back in. One of the little bars had become misaligned, so I took the stem-related parts out, and put it all back together. However, the stem still won't go in very far, and I noticed that the little bar that is pushed forward when the stem is pulled out (to set the watch) is moving freely (sorry, I can't remember the name). Here's a photo I took with my digital microscope:
View attachment 602686

Any thoughts on what I'm doing wrong here?

Thanks!
If the yoke is moving freely, you may have lost the yoke spring when you took the setting area apart. Here is a photo of what it should look like before you put the set lever jumper back on:



This photo is from a 6497-2 from a Panerai 116 (during disassembly) I'm servicing right now, but the setting parts are the same.

To remove and insert the stem, you must loosen the screw for the set lever that is on the other side of the movement (it's not a button that you push in on these typically) but when you do this, only unscrew the screw as far as you need to get the stem out, or you will have trouble with getting it back together.

Hope this helps.

Cheers, Al
 

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If the yoke is moving freely, you may have lost the yoke spring when you took the setting area apart. Here is a photo of what it should look like before you put the set lever jumper back on:



This photo is from a 6497-2 from a Panerai 116 (during disassembly) I'm servicing right now, but the setting parts are the same.

To remove and insert the stem, you must loosen the screw for the set lever that is on the other side of the movement (it's not a button that you push in on these typically) but when you do this, only unscrew the screw as far as you need to get the stem out, or you will have trouble with getting it back together.

Hope this helps.

Cheers, Al
+1 on the yoke spring (the "U" shaped piece of steel thread you see in the picture above) And probably you also have screwed in the screw for the set lever (the screw on the other side of the movement that needs to unscrew IOT get the stem out) If this is to thight, no chance of getting the stem in there. Try dissasembeling it again, and check for the yoke spring (hope you haven`t lost it:0) And unscrew the setting lever screw a bit also (so basicly EXACTLY what Al said here, hehe)

Had more or less the exact same problem he first go I had on a 6497 ...
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Thanks so much for the help guys. Yep, looks like I lost the yoke spring. There's a Russian watchmaker (mobster?) in town who might sell me one for some ungodly price.

And yes, there is a screw on the back that I originally loosened in the first place to pull the stem out.

Thanks again!

EDIT: I may not be able to get one from town, would it be possible to buy one elsewhere?
 

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In the back of the Jules Borel catalog, sorry, can't remember exactly which one, is a colored exploded view of a typical watch with the American and Swiss names and ebauche numbers. You would do well to study it and learn the names of watch parts. That would scratch the surface on what you could learn if you want to.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, I'll do that. Watchmaking was a passion of mine a couple of years ago and I memorized quite a bit. But, I'm subject to hand tremors (it runs in the family) and I gave it up out of frustration. I'm picking it back up and I'm a bit rusty. :)
 
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