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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had my Tudor GMT for about six months (second movement, first was swapped out after a month due to having the date issue). I’ve noticed an odd thing in the timing and just wondering how typical this is for mechanicals.

Basically, over long run periods (up to a month), the accuracy stays within 0.5 spd of how it starts. First long run was constantly at +2 spd, second was at -0.5 spd. More recently I noticed it running at about +4 spd over about 10 days. I let it run down, and now I’ve wearing it for a few days and it is back at +1.5 spd.

The odd thing is I seem to need to let the watch wind down completely in order to notice an appreciable change in the spd. This seems to have a bigger affect than e.g. wearing it, putting it down for long periods, fairly big changes in storage temperatures. I would expect to see big spd variations perhaps in those conditions, but instead I only see it after being allowed to fully run down and then starting again.

In the above, I am mostly wearing my watch all the time except at night, and it is pretty close to full power bar the 8 hours of run down at night.

Now I will admit that whilst I do sometimes remember to do some timing (despite the sound of the above I’m not that obsessed with accuaracy) this has not been established very scientifically (I’m a scientist by day). But I thought I’d ask, anecdotally, if this effect is common: do you tend to see bigger timing changes after a full run down and restart? Any theories on why this might be if so?
 

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My understanding of accuracy is that theyre regulated to several static positions to simulate various types of use ie at a desk, crown down (walking) etc so someone that spends their entire working life at a desk my get different results from someone who is a personal trainer as theyre regulated for "average use". My lifestyle is very variable and so is my watch wearing as I will wear my North flag for a day, leave it off for a day then wear it for 3 days then maybe leave it off all weekend and during that time I do notice a daily drift but over a fortnight its well within spec. In short, if you wind it, set it and wear it you should get good performance from it. There was a thread in the Omega forum a few weeks ago, where someone had timed their METAs movement on a daily basis and found it to be 10 seconds out on a particular day so returned it to Omega and they tested it and returned it to him saying it passed all tests. With Tudor watches ive found all of them to be very accurate. Maybe ive been lucky but even my ETA black bay is within cosc spec and its not cosc certified. Ive also found the power reserves on their in house to be above the 70 hours.
 

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I am not an expert but I think that towards the end of the PR as the tension in the main spring changes the watch tends to run with bigger inacuracy amplitude (normally it speeds up shortly before fully depleting the PR). Could it be that during the rest periods the watch was placed in different positions and hence the variations that you mention? Anecdotally, I've read somewhere that placing the watch with crown down it gains speed, placing it with the crown up acts the opposite.

English is not my native language so I hope it is clear! Why not judging the accuracy when regularly worn? If you let it to fully deplete you can get different variations shortly before depleting the PR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ah interesting- it might be it wasn’t really fully wound in one of those periods. Re the reserve- mine was pretty much bang on 72 hours, so happy with that.
 

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My Tudor GMT, purchased new in March, has run spot on every time it's worn, regardless how long it's worn. It's the most accurate watch I've owned.
dP
 

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I may be wrong however Isochronism for the watch should be fairly low but could be the culprit for what you are experiencing as the mainspring unwinds. What I think you may be noticing is that your reference point for the timing run after you let the watch stop is probably recorded on a fully wound watch. However if you hack the watch to start a new timing run without winding the watch fully you are starting at an unknown level and the timekeeping is changing as the watch becomes fully wound.
 

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I’ve had my Tudor GMT for about four months now, and I am very very pleased with it. I bought the Lepsi watch scope To get an idea of how it performs and more importantly how it performs in various positions. Overall it is accurate to less than one second today and quite often a fraction of a second. To get an idea of our performance and more importantly how it performs in various positions. Overall it is accurate do less than one second today and quite often a fraction of a second.. I wear it Every day and at night Leave it face up or crown down. This way it is almost spot-on and if it does wander off, it is Easily corrected overnight
 

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I am also very impressed with the accuracy of mine. Between 0.0 and +0.5 s/d is just insane. I bought mine in April/May this year. No issues so far.
 
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I got mine 6 days ago and set it with my phone. As of right now it is still within 10 seconds og my phone. Imperceptible change. I have had the watch on my wrist nearly 22 hours a day. Sleeping with it as well.
 

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Your watch is doing what mechanical watches do and it is all perfectly normal.
 
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I’ve had my Tudor GMT for about four months now, and I am very very pleased with it. I bought the Lepsi watch scope To get an idea of how it performs and more importantly how it performs in various positions. Overall it is accurate to less than one second today and quite often a fraction of a second. To get an idea of our performance and more importantly how it performs in various positions. Overall it is accurate do less than one second today and quite often a fraction of a second.. I wear it Every day and at night Leave it face up or crown down. This way it is almost spot-on and if it does wander off, it is Easily corrected overnight
Great watch! Mine bought just before the factory closed down in March, is running on the wrist for 9 hours per day -1.2spd, but it balances out at night as follows: face down, +1.5 and face up +.50. As TGV said in his review, it truly is "The Majestic Beast."
 

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I found in the press kits that recently (with the BB58 Blue) Tudor states that the accuracy is higher than COSC (highlighted in bold by me):

THE CALIBRE MT5402 The Manufacture Calibre MT5402, which equips the Black Bay Fifty-Eight “Navy Blue”, displays hour, minute and second functions. It has the finish typical of TUDOR Manufacture calibres. Its rotor in tungsten monobloc is openwork and satin-brushed with sand-blasted details, and its bridges and mainplate have alternate sand-blasted, polished surfaces and laser decorations. Its build has been designed to ensure robustness, longevity, reliability and precision, as has its variable inertia balance, which is maintained by a sturdy traversing bridge with a two-point fixation. Together with its non-magnetic silicon hairspring, the Manufacture Calibre MT5402 is chronometer-certified by the Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC), with its performance going beyond the standards set by this independent institute. In fact, where COSC allows for an average variation in the daily running rate of a watch movement of between -4 and +6 seconds in relation to absolute time, TUDOR applies a tolerance of between -2 and +4 seconds’ variation in its daily rate on the watch fully assembled. Another notable feature is that the power reserve of the Manufacture MT5402 Calibre is “weekend-proof”; that is to say about 70 hours, which enables the wearer to take the watch off on a Friday evening and put it back on again on Monday morning without having to wind and reset it.

They do not say that for the other movements....YET

And COSC only measures the movement before it's "cased", Tudor does the testing fully assembled. Which is much better.
 

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Coming back to the OPs question from over a year ago, it might help to measure the amplitude in all positions in these distinctive phases (of running with a stable but different rate). Something (one of the wheels in its jewels?) must be settling in a different stable position when the torque on the train goes to zero, and then stay like that until the next time this happens.
i have seen changes in rate, but I always attributed them to some bump, even if I didn't remember subjecting the watch to such a disturbance.

So, in short, it's an excuse to buy a timegrapher.
 

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Hello
half a year ago I bought TUDOR BB GMT. The watch worked super accurately, practically 100% accurate in two months, not worn at night for -1 sec, worn during the day for +1 sec. Then the date error occurred three times in 14 days and I returned the watch for warranty repair. After six weeks I got it back and since then it has become quite inaccurate., And over the course of the day from +1 to 4 sec. Overnight unworn + 1 to 4 sec depending on position. Because I wear it all day, I monitor the accuracy throughout the day as well. Lately, it has started to happen to me that when I am on a 1 hour long speed walk, it overtakes me + 4 sec in one hour. Then it runs normally again when I’m home. This has happened to me the last 3 walks. I tried same walks with my other watches (Omega, Tag Heuer, Panerai) but they always ran the same as during the day. Tudor is slowly getting on my nerves, as the service technician is interested in measuring for 1 week and if it is within COSC, they do not want to do anything.
When I measured the accuracy one week it was +35 sec, which is in the COSC range. I expect for the price I paid the constant running of the mechanism, not that it runs differently every day.
Any advice?
 

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That (running fast while moving) sounds like it could be overbanking/running into the banks/whatever it's called when the balance amplitude gets too high. Can you provoke this behaviour (fast running) by winding the watch when it is already fully wound? As I said, a good excuse to buy a timegrapher.
 

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Thanks for the reply and opinion. Since I am a big fan of mechanical watches, I ask you for advice on what the COSC certificate really means in everyday life when we wear a watch. How in which positions to rest and how many days are measured to get your own confirmation that the clock is in COSC frames. My lay belief is clearly misguided, because as you answer me, my expectations are too high, probably because I misinterpret daily deviations. All of this is happening to me because my watch worked great before the warranty repair date, but not the same after the service.
Im asking for help.
Thanks
 

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Same experience. My BB GMT was my most accurate watch until the movement was replaced under warranty due to the date jump issue. Since then it was losing 3 to 5 seconds per day on a constant basis. I've ended up selling the watch and replacing it with Rolex 16710.
 
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