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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody. I would like to start a subject about Tudor BB and and how dings and scratches on it affects its owner. I love my BBB which I own as my only and everyday watch since April 2016. Despite greatest possible care, I have noticed that like with myself, with the time and use, life scares in the form of scratches and dings have been appearing on the surface of SS the case. I have been careful, but bumps have been inevitable while the watch sits on the wrist. I tend to sit and contemplate the watch under different angles and see more and more markings of life on it. I end up saying to myself that those scratches are inevitable and that the only way to keep them in a mint/new condition would be keeping them in the box. I would think that the watch is made to be worn, specially if it's the sole one owns. The watch could be polished again by the repair service. Would you send the watch for re-polishing?


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Wait until your ready for service, and then ask yourself if you really want to have it polished. Its a watch, it will get wabi if you wear it. Enjoy it and don't sweat it. i had a watch for 30 years and finally had it polished when I decided to retire it to my watch box for good.
 

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You have a choice. Or really, several choices. First one, stop changing straps. That minimizes the marks on the lugs. Second, if you really must change straps, put tape on the lugs first before changing straps. Third, as others have said, you can send it off to be polished but if you don't want to deal with that, start wearing the watch with bubblewrap. Otherwise, enjoy it. Watches are meant to be worn and they will accumulate nicks and scratches over time. That's life.
 

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I have a Black Bay Blue as well and I know what you mean. The highly polished surface makes scratches inevitable. The thing I've learned about scratches is that the only person that really cares about them is the watch owner. From 4 feet away people will be able to tell that you're wearing a Black Bay, but they will most likely not be able to see scratches. I've seen Rolex Subs in the wild on people's wrist at a restaurant or coffee shop sitting a few feet away from me and I never once notice scratches (though I'm sure they are there). I always notice the watch design itself.

I've resorted to wearing my pieces instead of babying them. I take care of where I use them (I won't be changing my car oil in my Datejust) but I don't baby them. Scratches on the crystal would bother me much much more than scratches on the bracelet or the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your comments. I won't try to remove scratches myself. I will continue using the watch everyday and carefully changing straps/bracelets and then when time for service (third or forth) will I will evaluate if I would have it polished. The bubble wrap is a good option


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You should see the lugs of my subC ;) Also, there's a famous thread of a mechanic who wore a speedmaster daily for over a decade (correct me if I'm wrong). It's a pleasure knowing someone enjoyed a watch for what it's meant for.
 

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You should see the lugs of my subC ;) Also, there's a famous thread of a mechanic who wore a speedmaster daily for over a decade (correct me if I'm wrong). It's a pleasure knowing someone enjoyed a watch for what it's meant for.
If anyone has the link to this thread I'd be interested in reading it.
 

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I agree about letting the wabi happen. My BBR had gotten some light scratches in the polish. And this watch is part of a rotation and only worn once a week. The first time it was like OMG what am I gonna do. Once you get over it tho, you realize that a watch is meant to be worn.

I'd have us polished when serviced but don't get polish happy. It does remove metal. I saw one mid 60's turn-o-graph that had been polished so many time it actually thinned out the lugs and the shoulderless spring bars were popping thru both sides!


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Having a single watch makes it tough to keep it pristine. I'm afflicted with watch acquisition syndrome so any one watch is less prone to being scarred but nearly all of my watches, even the few I've purchased new and tried to baby, have some nicks, scratches, and swirls. Looking at it in that light, think of your watch's scratches, dings, and any other owner-induced imperfections as character. Like a previous poster mentioned, from even a small distance, most people won't notice. It's only when you're alone and gazing at your prize that you will see the imperfections. I know the angst it creates, I break out my microfiber cloth, steam the watch case hoping it's residue from lunch or fingerprints, lightly buff, and only to find that it's a real scratch. Try to think of those imperfections as souvenirs from an eventful journey. For your watch, that journey is its time with you and your adventures and daily life.

That's probably me trying to make myself feel better about it and certainly anthropomorphizing intimate objects but it makes me feel a little better about things.

I've also tried to get in the habit of wearing my more resilient (and/or less expensive) watches on the weekend and when I'm not at a desk in an office and am riding motorcycles, camping, hiking, working in the garage, etc. That's where my Damasko and Sinn watches thrive (ice-hardened steel in the former, tegimented in some of the latter). They have great lume, hardened cases, etc. and it is a challenge to maim their finishes.

If you are buying a watch to keep pristine in hopes of maximum resale value, you're probably thinking of a watch as an investment. If that's the case, most watches are poor investments. Many of us acquire these 'nice' watches thinking it may some day be an heirloom. If we are so fortunate to have someone close to us to appreciate them the way we do, what's going to be more meaningful to them: a flawless watch that looks like it lived in a darkened vault for the past 30 years or one that had battle scars and they can imagine where that watch had gone?
 

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Ok, I'm with the rest. If you want it polished wait until service. Otherwise, call it character. Now, I have been doing this a LONG time... can someone please tell me what the hell "wabi" is?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Again, thanks to every one commenting in this posting with your wisdom. Have a nice week


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I have a BB and the polished sides do get easily scratched. If you have a friendly AD nearby they'll give it a quick brush for you and won't charge. As others have said though, over polishing isn't good so make sure its pretty messy if you do take it in. Mine is on its way to Tudor after coming off my bike so I'm dreading what its going to cost but they're for wearing and it was one of those things.
 

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I have no problem with a light polish but it will just happen again. So a polish every 8 years or so won't make it look over polished.

I have found that my Tudors, neither is polished, seem to scratch easier than my other watches. Hell I scratched my Ranger lug worse than I have ever scratched a lug on its first strap change.



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A watch is meant to be worn. Be careful of course, but don't sweat the inevitable. By the time service rolls around, I'll bet you've come to appreciate the 'life' you've added to the piece.
 
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