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As Rolex have resale value especially if it was bought as used but in good condition. Similarly, does Tudor have resale value?
 

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It depends on the watch. A Tudor snowflake generally sold for about $2500 5 years ago. They are beginning to nudge the $4000 mark now. A standard 34mm dress watch has not appreciated nearly as much.
 

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It depends on the watch. A Tudor snowflake generally sold for about $2500 5 years ago. They are beginning to nudge the $4000 mark now. A standard 34mm dress watch has not appreciated nearly as much.

Agreed. Mixed bag. Along with the Tudor subs, the Rangers have been relatively hot on resale... but the problem with those are the number of fakes or rather re-dials and franken watches. I think some of the 90's and early 00 models, like the Chronographs will move up quick in price.

The bottom end of the Tudor market are the vintage dress watches, and then maybe the manual wind 50's/60's oyster case, and then the date auto oyster. I own a manual oyster date "shockproof", so I know directly. Many manual wind pieces you can pick up for a few hundred depending on condition.

But just my opinion, I think with the re-launch of Tudor, I suspect like Rolex, even the neglected steel oyster case models will eventually creep up in price as more interest focuses on Tudor. Actually, I think the prices are already creeping upwards.

Tudor in the 50's and 60's has some gaps in history (or rather lack in interest), documentation issues and as such, suffers from a lot of franken watches - so be careful about that. I suppose because Tudor was always viewed as the poorer sibling to Rolex, people tended to treat them rougher and maybe cared less about keeping them original (because they figured they'd never really be collectible). Some were even cannibalized to make Rangers or even to make Rolex models (like some old Explorers). Anyhow, I think in the next few years these gaps in knowledge will be largely resolved.

Just my .02
 

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As others have mentioned, it depends on the model and you really do have to be careful if you're looking at vintage sport models. As for currently models only time will tell.
Who knows..... maybe due to the limited run of Pelagos' with modified ETA movements versus the new in house version, the Gen 1 may increase in value more so that the 2nd Gen.....but again who knows.....
 

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Who knows..... maybe due to the limited run of Pelagos' with modified ETA movements versus the new in house version, the Gen 1 may increase in value more so that the 2nd Gen.....but again who knows.....
Not to call you out in particular, as I've seen this general line of thinking in multiple posts on the topic, but is there any precedent for a model with a modified ETA (or other non-in-house) movement being more valuable over time than the model with the first in-house movement in it? Outside of wishful/hopeful thinking on the part of Gen1 owners. Generally I get that the 'first' model of a watch generally could hold some more value than further iterations, but one could say that the in-house movement model is also a 'first' model in its own right.
 

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Not to call you out in particular, as I've seen this general line of thinking in multiple posts on the topic, but is there any precedent for a model with a modified ETA (or other non-in-house) movement being more valuable over time than the model with the first in-house movement in it? Outside of wishful/hopeful thinking on the part of Gen1 owners. Generally I get that the 'first' model of a watch generally could hold some more value than further iterations, but one could say that the in-house movement model is also a 'first' model in its own right.
What comes to mind is the zenith Daytona. It doesn't necessarily bring more of a premium over a New Daytona (unless it is a Patrizzi dial), but it definitely holds its own.
 

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Not to call you out in particular, as I've seen this general line of thinking in multiple posts on the topic, but is there any precedent for a model with a modified ETA (or other non-in-house) movement being more valuable over time than the model with the first in-house movement in it? Outside of wishful/hopeful thinking on the part of Gen1 owners. Generally I get that the 'first' model of a watch generally could hold some more value than further iterations, but one could say that the in-house movement model is also a 'first' model in its own right.
Actually it was just the first example that came to mind. I don't own a Pelagos anymore so it wasn't from a wishful thinking standpoint. My view when it comes to Rolex and Tudor in this matter is that there are hardcore collectors who are willing to pay a premium to complete a set. Although not Tudor, look at GMT "fat ladies" or exclamation dials. Or even rail dial models. Very minor differences to most but a completely different watch to others. Or possibly in the case of the Pelagos, 2 lines of writing vs 5.....who knows.
In terms of movements, this will be a first for Tudor using an in house movement and ironically completely against the reason Wildorf created Tudor in the first place.
 

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The modern Tudor models, in particular, the Black Bay, will probably retain fairly good value if sold within 6 months of their purchase, and in mint condition. Further down the track, I am not so sure, but I have got a positive gut feeling about Tudor. Tudor is certainly on a high right now, and I really like the direction that they have been taking for the last couple of years.
 
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