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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Reading the recent "PMs" thread I was wondering about accepted etiquette in ADs. I visit watch-stands often, take a keen interest in the stock, sometimes make little notes on my phone, acknowledge the staff, say thank you and try to finalise my next purchase. I never ask to handle a watch unless I am seriously considering it, but don't feel obligated to buy it from 2 mins of wearing. I NEVER try on a watch out of my budget and when I do try one, I put my bag or jacket on the counter to protect it from scratching against the case-glass etc. I don't go to the AP showroom to try on the latest complication with $50 in my pocket, don't spend time nattering to the IWC man with no intention of buying one and have often refused to wear a piece I know I can't afford even when proferred by the salesperson, usually telling them it's too expensive but very nice and "one day I will be able to afford it". (I couldn't resist looking at a JLC Rev when one salesman offered, but I did tell him I wouldn't be buying it and he said this was ok. We both kind of looked at the piece with lust for a bit then put it back behind the glass with a sigh :))The way I see it, if I am actually in the market for a new piece and I can actually afford what I'm looking at and I don't handle anything I'm not genuinely considering, I feel it's ok to take a while over my final decision.
Does everyone else behave similarly?
 

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I'll try on a watch if they want me to.
I've always got a zillion $ worth of credit in my wallet and I've been known to just black out and buy something.
I'm basically why they really WANT you to try it on.
Your method is definitely better.
 

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New to the forum. It seems to me that a watch shop is there to sell you watches. I'm 23, and I was standing in a Porsche dealership once while waiting for my friend's Saab to be repaired. A salesman walked up to me and asked if I wanted to look at the 911s. I laughed and said sure. We walked around the lot and looked at all the cars. He knew full well I couldn't afford a Porsche. He was just a good salesman doing what he's suppose to do: fostering brand loyalty (or envy) early, in the hopes that in the long run it would increase his sales.

Likewise, I went to a Rolex AD and was looking at the watches. The saleswoman pulled the watch I was looking at out of the case and asked if I wanted to try it on. I declined, mostly because I was nervous about handling a $6,000 watch, but I wouldn't have felt guilty for trying it on. They're there to sell watches. The watches are in the case to be looked at, held, and tried on. As long as you're polite, have a genuine interest in the watch, and aren't abusing the privilege, I don't see why it would be wrong to try on a watch or two that was presently out of your price range.
 

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I shop just like you Steve.
I see no point in trying on things that are SO far away from where I am now in terms of what I can/am willing to spend.
UNLESS - the salesperson INSISTS that I do.
But usually, I will examine/handle ONLY things that are eminently within reach, now or within one year.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I can see Bronte's point.......if you only go there once. If you make a habit of going to the same store and trying on PPs, that's a different story.
 

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When I go to my AD, I try on what I want, and they often gesture for me to try things on (like £80-100k Patek). I allow myself to purely because I have a long relationship with them, and am great friends outside the AD's walls with them as well.
If I didn't know them, I wouldn't try the stuff I do on.

cheers,
Jake.
 

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I don't even go into a hardware store unless I have a clear idea of what I want and a definite intention of buying. I prefer to look on my own without interference and then either confirm or deny my inclination with a brief visit to a store. I do my research online, and then if it's something that I don't feel I can buy that way I'll go to the store and complete my purchase in person.
Recently I was in the US Virgin Islands and went into a large watch retailer. Although the staff were friendly and not pushy, I didn't stay long. I don't like any store where you have to ask about pricing even if you're buying a G-Shock. I would never waste the salesperson's time trying on watches when I had no intention of buying.
For what it's worth I did buy something in the ship's boutique but I had the whole cruise to make up my mind, not half an hour in a port of call.
If I were going to ever buy the watch of my dreams I'd get it locally even if I had to pay a bit more.
 

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I'm comfortable trying something outside my budget because I know I'm not going to buy. I can both enjoy the effort as well as use it to justify purchasing something more realistically priced. Just don't fall into the subtle trap that some salesmen can set and keep the plastic in the wallet.
 

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I buy not only the watch but also the seller as they say, and thus have a relationship with most dealers I deal with (I've been dealing with many of them for years). I inquire/try on that which I'm interested in, typically calling them up beforehand to set up an appointment. When I arrive, they've put away for me not only the item(s) that I'm interested in but also a few surprises, things they know that I'll never buy but which they are enthusiastic to show me nonetheless, and which I wouldn't try on but for the fact I know them (they so enjoy showing me things, so who am I to spoil their surprise). Same with vintage dealers, some of whom when I meet up with take great pleasure in showing me some extraordinary pieces--some of them serious collector's items worth at the least the price of a luxury automobile, which are a pleasure to hold in the flesh so to speak, but which to their knowledge I won't buy. That said, I obviously enjoy the experience and their sharing of such pieces with me, else I wouldn't keep going back time and time again to buy more, right? ;)

Cheers.
 
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