WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A while back I posted about the TZ L1 course and promised to report back when I'd finished the L2 course. I finished awhile back and I've been working on various movements since to build up experience. Here's my thoughts/observations and some pics. Hopefully they will encourage (or discourage) others to try it!

L2 builds on L1 with the focus on the ETA 2836-2 movement. This introduces the complexity of an Automatic Winding movement and Day / Date capability.

L2 assumes you are putting the techniques and best practices learnt in L1 to good use in L2 IE, correct handling of parts, correct cleaning during reassembly etc.

The course covers the movement in detail and assumes you now know the names/labels of the basic parts.

L2 delves a lot deeper into watch servicing and regulation than L1.

Details of correct cleaning are given and this should not be overlooked as the price of ultrasonic cleaners has now fallen to such a level that one should be bought along with the L2 toolkit.

I would also recommend one of the mains powered demagnitisers.

Lubrication is perhaps the biggest subject in L2 and is quite an art / skill in its self. Attention must be paid during these lessons as over lubrication or the use of the wrong lubrication will cause headaches later! The complete lubrication of the 2836 is performed including the barrel where no less than 3 separate oils are used for this one part! The types of oil and their application / intended use are discussed plus the amount to administer, which are tiny! Trying to oil the balance and pallet jewels is a real test for ones skill and determination, just have a look at the following pics! The course notes are clear though and easy to follow. I've used the practices taught here on other movement types like the Russian 2416 etc. with success.

The Date and Day mechanism is discussed in detail as are the workings of the Automatic Winding system, again there are plenty of clear pictures and clear descriptions to help you.

The final part shows you how to case up the 2836-2 and turn all that hard work into a usable working watch! There is a detailed lesson on regulation and all that entails plus some discussion on timing machine readouts and interpreting them. The course stops short of fully detail explanation about regulation using timing machines but there is a good follow on article on the TZ web site that goes into much greater depth with real life examples.

The L1 class was daunting enough for a complete novice and L2 keeps this up with perhaps an even greater step up in the challenge / dexterity stakes. However, I really enjoyed working my way through L1 and more so L2, as I said, since finishing I've completed work on other movements to gain more experience. I've re-visited my L1 2801-2 movement and oiled it properly plus I've worked on a number of 2824-2 movements and some Russian ones like the 2415/2416b. Ebay is a good source for cheap watches and movements to practice on. This will also improve your fault finding skills which, in fairness, the TZ courses do not cover.

Now I desperately need a timing machine as manual regulation over a number of days is very tedious....I have my eye on a Microset timer which seems very reasonable price wise having messed about with sound card based systems and not got very far!

In closing I feel the TZ courses are worth every Cent/Penny and will give anybody interested a good grounding in the basics of watch servicing. Recommended :-!

Here's some pictures and thanks for reading.

Various parts:


Pallet fork and gears:


Close up:


Barrel prior to oiling. This part of the build was interesting, the spring has a mind of it's own and wants to go anywhere but into the barrel housing. Eventually I got there! No breakages!



Mainplate after cleaning:


Re-build starts:



Here's the pallet fork, and yes we have to get a tiny drop of oil on the ends of those jewels!



Here the fork and bridge are installed:


Here is the very delicate balance wheel and spring. This one seems to be in good order with nicely concentric and spaced rings. This part is the last to be removed and the last to be re-fitted:


Dial side with Keyless works fitted (and working!) but can you spot my deliberate mistake?


Dial side complete; still have not noticed my mistake yet:


Date Wheel installed and mistake corrected….I neglected to install the hour wheel so when testing the quick date change mechanism I noticed it was not moving…Oh well easily done!


Now's the time to oil the balance jewels. I use a piece of Rodico to keep the little blighters in place and stop them performing their magic disappearing trick!


A generous (!) drop of oil needs to be place in the center of the jewel (flat side):


Ready to be replaced:


Finally ticking again, I was not 100% happy with my oiling efforts on the balance wheel so I re-did them little while later:


Only the Auto winding mech to re-fit plus the regulation and it's done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,655 Posts
Hi -

Fannntastic.

I've done two courses now with a local watchmaker and learned a great deal, but he doesn't cover lubrication and regulation, as it cuts too much into his business. :-X

Given what you've written here, sounds like the course has really helped you out with these topics. I've got some time coming up in the summer of 2007 that I hope to be able to use for hobby purposes... :)

Thanks for the post!

JohnF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
:think: I'm not sure, I've not timed myself! I guess I can strip the movement down in about 30mins now and cleaning and drying takes another 30..... re-assembly is variable though! If all goes well with no issues I'd say 1 to 1.5hrs actual bench time but I like to take things steady, no rush, so maybe longer. I'm just a novice remember, so lots of tea/coffee consumed during the build process! :)

The longest part for me is the regulation process, I must get a timing machine....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
Nice work. Lubrication and cleanliness is probably one of the largest issues that discriminate professionals from the rest. I notice you are using rodico to stabilize your parts, keep in mind rodico not only cleans but picks up oils and dirt from your hands and will transfer it to your watch. The goal is to work on a watch without touching it during oiling and reassembly. Finger cots work well - get the ones with no powder. Don't' worry about time... you'll get quicker. From a cost perspective look at the timer made by Bryan Mumford (I helped on the early prototypes) It is very good. http://www.bmumford.com/. Good job - Practice practice and more practice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for the tips Henry! :-! Work without touching :think: OK, I better start practicing! You had a hand in the MicroSet design! That's neat! It's the exact model I was planning on getting, the Watchtimer... B-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Thanks for the info, I'm considering the class also. I'd love to know the final cost-it looks like 500-600 for the classes but that doesn't include the materials for the watch does it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,415 Posts
Great pics and review of the course, I have been interested in this for some time.
Thanks
Robert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Robert PM'd me as I'd missed Migo's post, sorry!

The L1 course material requires a $50 registration fee, you can register here:

http://www.timezonewatchschool.com

Then you need to purchase a toolkit from here:

http://www.tztoolshop.com

Note: it's not compulsory to buy their kit, however, as the course is written around the ETA2801-2 included in the kit, it makes sense to buy it. Also the kit contains all the basic tools you'll need to complete the course and for whenever you take other watches apart. I think you should budget for this if starting from scratch like I did.

There are a number of L1 kits with various options like the inclusion of a watch case to house the movement when you have finished. These range from $230 to $270.

The L2 course again needs a $50 registration fee and the materials to finish it. Again there are a range of kits at similar prices to L1.

I chose not to buy an L2 kit but only parts of it. As I'm located in the UK I found some of the materials locally at a lower cost so it pays to look around.

As your experience and interest grows you may want to invest in some of the recommended additional items like a small sonic cleaner and demagnetizer, it really is down to you as to how far and how much you want to invest. There's no pressure on time so you can go as fast or slow as you like and also at a speed that suits your buget.

Todate I estimate I've invested in the region of $600. That includes all the oils listed in L2, the tools and a cleaner, demagnitiser, hand puller and setter etc. I've also managed to find some boken watches and movments to practice on.

My next biggest expense is going to be a MicroSet watch timer! Which will bring my investment up to $1100 or so. Now that's not small fry and it's not for everyone but for me I think its $$$ well spent, I'm learning a great deal and It's going to save me $$ when some of my collection needs attention.

I hope this helps anybody interested in learning more about this facinating hobby.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top