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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)



Waltham mounted chronometer watch,issued to the US Navy,37 size,15 jewel,8 day movement.Waltham used a movement they used for a automobile clock.But for the US Navy they up graded it to 15 jewels,adjusted to temp.and isochronism and given a polarity test at the time was a Naval observatory specification requirement.They were made from 1907-1937.One other requirment a winding indicator the automobile clock had a red and green dot to tell you when to wind but the Navy one had a wind indicator like ships chronometers telling you how many days before you had to wind it.The serial no on the movement 22115845 and has the US Navy serial no 847 on side of brass case.And was made around 1919.
 

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Wow... cool! I notice there is even a built in level for the gimbal. How accurate were they spec'ed to be... or were the weighted towards isochronism?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since it was used for navigation they had to be accurate they did so mutch to the movement I did not want to write it all it was fitted with a large compensation balance with a Breguet steel hairspring,an upper diamond cap jewel,gold balance and meantime screws,double roller escapement,sapphire roller jewels and powered by two mainsprings witch wound simultaneously when crown was turned it had to be good and accurate I am glad I got some good books to look up info there is so mutch to learn about watches.It was also pendent set.
 

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That is an interesting watch. I have been thinking of getting a primary ship chronometer like that for some time. Lovely!

Erik_H
 

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Hi -

Fantastic, extremely collectible. :)

The interesting idea behind putting the watch on gimbals is, of course, to reduce the effects of gravity changes on the watch movement by keeping it basically in one position as much as possible. While not always possible in very bad weather when the ship would tilt severely (think hurricanes), under normal conditions the watch could be kept almost always level, meaning that the effect of gravity on the operation of the watch movement could be optimized to virtually nothing. This, coupled with the very high quality components and the work of a master watchmaker to reduce isochronism to an absolute minimum meant that these were perhaps the finest portable mechanical watch movements ever made, excelled only by by astronomy-quality precision pendulum clocks.

Truly outstanding. :) I'd love to have one at my desk at work...but these are extremely rare, and when they do appear, they command more money than I have spent cumulatively on all of my watches...sigh. :)

Congrats on that one!

JohnF
 

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I just inherited one of these watches without the wooden case. Serial 18157278
It is running and keeping good time. I wonder how much value the case adds to the total value?
 

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Hi -

Welcome to the forum and WUS! :)

We don't do valuations here, please read the sticky posts at the top of the forum as to why.

It does add value. It's just that there's no way, short of selling it, to know how much value.

JohnF
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just inherited one of these watches without the wooden case. Serial 18157278
It is running and keeping good time. I wonder how much value the case adds to the total value?
If you need the inner box with gimbles and the outer box I know some one that makes good replacement boxes for cronometer's let me know and I will PM you with his web site I just got a outer box for mine and it's as good as the real one's I just could not find a real outer box I don't know if it add's value I did it it to protect the original inner box that had a repair crack in the wood of box and the outer box look's nice.Look for a post I did on getting the outer box and you will see his work.
 
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