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Since a couple of months I found a new hobby and I have been tinkering on watches. I’m still wondering about something. I see most watchmakers working with ‘in the eye’ loupes. I have tried this but find working under a microscope much more practical. At least you have both eyes to use.
I’m I missing something? Is there a reason why the “pro’s” use a loupe or it this just a habit of them ? J
I’m asking because I want to buy a better microscope with a longer focus, so I can use a screwdriver under the scope.
 

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Hi,

Good luck with your watchmaking! Like many things in watchmaking it's all about selecting the right tool. So, maybe first, take a closer look at the issue and do a simple search of the forum and see what comes to light - as microscopes/optics have been frequently discussed as you may imagine. :)

Best wishes - Tom
 

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I use the eye I hold my loupe with to look at the movement and inspect the parts, but when I have to look at my bench to grab a part or another tool I just open my left eye. I do have a coworker who uses a magnifying visor instead of a loupe. I feel like constantly working with a microscope would be inconvenient. If I were you I would give a visor a shot as it's much less expensive than a microscope.

I actually do have a microscope related question for the other watchmakers.
When shopping for a microscope for professional use and in order to be approved for swatch/rolex parts accounts, what brands are approved and what features are needed in a microscope?
 

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For me, as a beginner, I find that looking through a loupe and also keeping my other eye open gives me better depth perception when trying to place parts into the movement.
I have a USB microscope but I find it harder to work with.

I guess there are benefits and drawbacks to each.
 

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I have worked on small parts, not just watches, using a stereo microscope and I can tell you that once you get accustomed to it, it's pretty awesome. Variable power microscopes like 10-40x are more expensive, but very nice. You can spend less and get one that comes with a couple different power eye pieces. Something I think looks nice, but I haven't used, yet, is some of the microscopes that hook to a laptop or monitor, so your image is on the screen. I personally think that may offer some advantages and be really nice. Some also allow you to record what you are doing. Might be handy to rewind and see which direction that tiny part just flew in! haha.

I think the style that has a boom, or the other style where you can pivot the microscope off the "stage" that is part of the base of the scope is a nice, and probably almost a must have.
 
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