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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm loving the morning mail these days! This piece arrived this morning and I scheduled an "at home" afternoon so I could admire it without interruption. I will get some work done too, but only after I post these pictures:



A polishing smudge on the case back - not a mark. That's dust on the crystal, not a mark on the dial face. These macros are unforgiving!





 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Chronograph is your usual 2 or 3 register movement, with "stop watch" timing functions. A Chronometer is a movement that has met minimum standards of accuracy as established by the Swiss Fleurier Quality Foundation. Such a watch is entitled to bear the "C.O.S.C." designation on said watch. Seiko submitted (as I understand it) a series of movements for certification in the early 70's. One can imagine the effect this had on the Swiss, who were accustomed to having their pool all to themselves. It was, however, a mark of distinction for Seiko to be admitted to such an august group. If memory serves, a COSC movement must not deviate by more than +- 4 sec. per day.
 

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It is gorgeous! My kinda dress watch :-!

Enjoy it's beauty and history!
 

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wow..............beautiful! Wear it in good health. Hope you post size specs, mechanics, history etc. Does KS stand for "King Seiko"?
 

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King Seiko chronometres rock! And examples in excellent condition are hard to coe by - good score. These are very significant pieces IMO. Seiko submits movements to the COSC and gets the certificates... COSC changes the rules so only Swiss watches can be chronometres... Seiko sets their own even higher standards for the Grand Seiko line... an interesting period for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
wow..............beautiful! Wear it in good health. Hope you post size specs, mechanics, history etc. Does KS stand for "King Seiko"?
Ahhhh, this is where some of the love will evaporate, I think. It measures approximately 35mm in diameter, and lug to lug is 44 mm, so it is quite petite. As we all know, small watches are somewhat out of fashion these days, but that does mean that a good example like this may be had for a very reasonable price, considering what it is.

KS does stand for King Seiko. Seiya Kobayashi, in his article on GS, suggests that the 52 movement was produced (this is a 5625) by Seiko to show that their movements were superior to the quartz offerings of the day and was to be their best movement and he feels, was superior to the equivalent GS movement.

This watch was produced in October, 1971. I know nothing of its history other than its condition speaks to careful use.

It is an automatic movement with quickset date. This last function needs some attention. Regulation of the beat is done via a screw that protrudes through the lug area at 6:00. It is a one piece case, and the bezel and crystal must be removed in order to gain access to the movement.
 

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Very nice example and very hard to find in that condition. I know, I've been looking;-)

Congratulations!
 

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:think: Really? I understood the relationship between the KS and GS was more akin to the 8L35 (MM300) and the decorated GS movement (whichever one that is). Not saying you're wrong, just that this is interesting. Got a link to Seiya's piece?

Seiya Kobayashi, in his article on GS, suggests that the 52 movement was produced (this is a 5625) by Seiko to show that their movements were superior to the quartz offerings of the day and was to be their best movement and he feels, was superior to the equivalent GS movement.
 

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:think: Really? I understood the relationship between the KS and GS was more akin to the 8L35 (MM300) and the decorated GS movement (whichever one that is). Not saying you're wrong, just that this is interesting. Got a link to Seiya's piece?
This all also happened at the same time that Seiko was starting to scare the pants off the Swiss with their increasingly strong finishes in the Observatory Competitions in Switzerland. There came a time when Seiko came in a VERY strong 2nd (some could argue higher if the Refs were square) and suddenly the competitions were put on hold temporarily. Swiss pride. The excuse was the quartz revolution and it was just coincidence that Seiko was really beginning to shine. Oh, check the Grand Seiko accuracy criteria vs. COSC......
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Thanks!
 

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Ahhhh, this is where some of the love will evaporate, I think. It measures approximately 35mm in diameter, and lug to lug is 44 mm, so it is quite petite. As we all know, small watches are somewhat out of fashion these days, but that does mean that a good example like this may be had for a very reasonable price, considering what it is.

KS does stand for King Seiko. Seiya Kobayashi, in his article on GS, suggests that the 52 movement was produced (this is a 5625) by Seiko to show that their movements were superior to the quartz offerings of the day and was to be their best movement and he feels, was superior to the equivalent GS movement.

This watch was produced in October, 1971. I know nothing of its history other than its condition speaks to careful use.

It is an automatic movement with quickset date. This last function needs some attention. Regulation of the beat is done via a screw that protrudes through the lug area at 6:00. It is a one piece case, and the bezel and crystal must be removed in order to gain access to the movement.
no love evaporating here...that's a classic size and appropos for that era, plus I don't have big wrists, 35-36mm for a dress watch.....no problem!
 

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no love evaporating here...that's a classic size and appropos for that era, plus I don't have big wrists, 35-36mm for a dress watch.....no problem!
Agreed! Small watches will make their comeback just watch b-)
 

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Chronometer = C.O.S.C. Watches with movements that have been certified for accuracy etc. over an extended period of time, currently, I think mechanical movements have to be within -4/+6 second per day. Back in the day I think it was open to everyone to submit movements, however today, I think it is only open to Swiss watches. C.O.S.C. is more of a non-profit marketing arm of the Swiss watch federation and/or goverment, but it does define how "good" the watch movement is, at least from the factory.
 
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