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Discussion Starter #1
just sent my powermatic for service before i change to a new strap.
wonder how many people have it, and why are there so many different looks?
please do post your powermatics if you have.
is the 481 powering powermatics and futrematics only?
 

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Here's my Powermatic. I think it's a redial:





The cal. 481 was only used in the Powermatic, never in the Futurematic. It was made from about 1948 through the mid 1960's. LeCoultre usually did a couple of new models per year and these all had a choice of several dials. That's a lot of different combinations. They were also made in 14K gold, gold filled and steel. This doesn't include models marketed outside North America that were branded as "Jaeger-LeCoultre". These had Swiss made cases (including 18K gold), but again only used the cal. 481 movement.

The Futurematic was only made from 1951 to 1961 in relatively small quanties. It used cals. 497 (most common), 817, 827 and 837, the last two being very rare. It also had a power reserve feature, but unlike the Powermatic, could not be manually wound. The Futurematic also had a rotor lock when fully wound to prevent damage to the mainspring.

You can find more information here:

Jaeger-LeCoultre Futurematic

Hope this helps,
gatorcpa
 

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Here's my Powermatic. I think it's a redial:





.
The Futurematic also had a rotor lock when fully wound to prevent damage to the mainspring.



Hope this helps,
gatorcpa
Cool.
Strange they needed a 'rotor' - guess you mean 'bumper' lock. John Harwood did it with a friction patent.
Look at the difference between a Harwood 'bumper' and these?

Thanks for posting it
a
 

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Very cool, and relatively inexpensive pieces.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1370261623.784561.jpg

mine before the strap change and
service... the dial looks strange..
empty.. is it a re-dial?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
LeCoultre Automatic - 481 Mid 50s. It looks nearly like the LeCoultre which James Dean wore!

thats another interesting story. some article said he wore the futurematic. then he also had a pocket watch by standard... so... kind of confused..
 

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LeCoultre Automatic - 481 Mid 50s. It looks nearly like the LeCoultre which James Dean wore!

thats another interesting story. some article said he wore the futurematic. then he also had a pocket watch by standard... so... kind of confused..
I have never heard he wore a futurematic, only powermatic! Dean also wore a pocket watch which was at the same time I reckon.
 

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Cool.
Strange they needed a 'rotor' - guess you mean 'bumper' lock. John Harwood did it with a friction patent.
Look at the difference between a Harwood 'bumper' and these?
OK, you asked:


Futurematic - You can see the hook in the back of the "oscillating weight" (that's what the parts sheet calls it):



There's a hidden pin that comes up and grabs that hook when the watch is fully wound.

Harwood:



Not sure how the friction lock works here. BTW, the watch is off for service. Hope your man can do it right!
gatorcpa
 

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OK, you asked:


Futurematic - You can see the hook in the back of the "oscillating weight" (that's what the parts sheet calls it):



There's a hidden pin that comes up and grabs that hook when the watch is fully wound.

Harwood:



Not sure how the friction lock works here. BTW, the watch is off for service. Hope your man can do it right!
gatorcpa
You lost me here
This was the movement you previously posted - a bumper:


Hence my comment.

If you want details of the Harwood - Friction patent - I can send you it. That piece of metal on the top with three screws is the part to adjust it

worry not about Jim

Best Regards
adam
 

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You lost me here
This was the movement you previously posted - a bumper:
The first movement was the cal. 481 Powermatic movement. It has a standard bumper automatic with a slipping clutch on the mainspring. The second one is the cal. 497/817 Futurematic, which has the unique "hook and pin" system. The OP confused the Powermatic and Futurematic.

Both are JLC bumper automatic movements with power reserve complications, but are otherwise very different.

On the Harwood, I think you've already sent me the patent information. Just not sure how it works exactly. It will probably make more sense to me when the watch is serviced and running normally.

Take care,
gatorcpa
 

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The first movement was the cal. 481 Powermatic movement. It has a standard bumper automatic with a slipping clutch on the mainspring. The second one is the cal. 497/817 Futurematic, which has the unique "hook and pin" system. The OP confused the Powermatic and Futurematic.

Both are JLC bumper automatic movements with power reserve complications, but are otherwise very different.

On the Harwood, I think you've already sent me the patent information. Just not sure how it works exactly. It will probably make more sense to me when the watch is serviced and running normally.

Take care,
gatorcpa
Thanks Understand now. I have Bascha excellent book - I was too lazy to pull it out.
Yes I sent the American version in English, it explains in great detail that part of the invention
That said I feel each watch would need to be set up by hand LOL
 

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My powermatic -- actually up for sale under the Sales Corner right now!

lecoultre2.jpg
 
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