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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

I recently purchased a vintage Omega Seamaster.

It's come to my attention that the location of the "TWENTY-FOUR 24 JEWELS" engraving is wrong. It's still on the correct piece but it's written in the middle, not the bottom of the piece. I've attached pictures below.

After some research, it seems like this particular piece has been taken from the Cal 552 or 562 movements. Both of these movements have 24 jewels and the placement of the "TWENTY-FOUR 24 JEWELS" engraving for these movements matches the one in my watch.

Is this something that I should be concerned with? I'd really appreciate some insight.

Movement in my watch:
Mine.JPG

Movement in Cal 565:
Normal.jpg
 

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Good catch! (and welcome to the forum). So, I guess the question is -- do you have a 552 or 562 caliber with a 565 bridge or a 565 caliber with a 552 or 562 bridge? Don't know, but I'm fairly certain that you hunt (or at least shoot). I've never seen anyone around these here parts refer to a watch caliber in .xxx fashion.

It's not too uncommon to find movement pieces to have been intermingled in vintage pieces. Sometimes a piece will get damaged or have extensive corrosion, so a watchmaker or reseller will substitute a piece they know is the same size, is readily available from their parts/movement stash and which won't adversely affect performance. Other times, a watchmaker will be overhauling a couple or more movements at the same time and get things intermingled during reassembly (I've experienced this first hand). It's a bigger problem when one is putting 564 chronometer bridges on a 565 and suggesting the movement is something it isn't (not that a piece adjusted to 5 positions 40 yrs ago should today be expected to function within COSC specs) just to sell it at a higher price.

If it were a solid gold Connie with auction value, I'd be concerned about complete authenticity and originality of each and every part. For a seamaster, not so much. Unless I saw a battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi aardvarkbark,

Thanks for the welcome and for the information. (I don't know why I started using the particular caliber notation that I did. Thanks for the correction! I've changed it in my post, but I can't fix the one in the title.)

That's really good to know! I have yet to receive the watch, so I'll double check on the movement and the quickset date when I get it. From my research, the 552 and 562 do not have quickset date functionality (the 552 doesn't have date functionality at all). So I could just check to see if the watch has quickset functionality, right?

And I'll look out for a battery ;)
 

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This is called the "upper bridge for automatic device" and the part number for the 552 and 565 are the same. They are both part number 72205521031.

Of course the 552 is the base movement that the 565 was built on, so they do share many parts.

I suspect any difference in the location of the engraving are related to the time frame they were produced, not that they are from different movements.

If I look at the Cal. 565 technical guide, the photo of the entire movement has this engraving in the middle of the bridge like your watch. But in the same technical guide, the photo of the bridge itself has the engraving at the bottom. I would not get too concerned about this one way or another personally.

Cheers, Al
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Hi Al,

Thanks a lot for the information and reassurance. For future reference, how did you find the part number for the upper bridge? I tried looking for a Cal. 565 technical guide, but wasn't able to find one with such detailed specifications.
 

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Al ('Archer') is an independent watchmaker who is trained and certified to service Omegas and he has a parts account with them. He may have access to parts #s that you can't easily find on the internet.

Do you know what the reference number is for the piece you have purchased, and are you aware that you can go to the vintage database on Omega's website to confirm that it was originally produced using the movement yours has in it? Sometimes, a movement that fits and is in better condition will get substituted for the original one, but the caliber may be different. Some unscrupulous sellers have no qualms about representing these as 'original' and 'authentic' because, they argue, all of the materials in the piece are original and authentic, even though they may not have originally left the factory as a single unit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I see. Well that makes sense!

Yes, I've already verified my watch's reference number against the vintage database. I'll double check again when my watch gets here. Thanks for the tip--this has saved me from buying several frankenstein watches over the course of my searches.
 
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