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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Now that quartz watches have been around for over 40 years shouldn't they also be classed as vintage?

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I just finnished cleaning up this beautiful Certina watch and I love it to bits but I have put it up for sale as I don't see me as a collector, but I 'm having regrets for it's just special.

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Sure it has scratches but that is part of it's history so I only clean metal but I do remove scratches from the crystal as you need to be able to use it as a watch.

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I'm not telling where I'm selling it as this is not a add for my watches but just a homage to a great watch.

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The movement is a 7 jewel ESA 952.111. One interesting thing is that it also has the ETA crest and soon ESA would be gone all together. The first generation of quartz movements almost always had a adjustment screw (the screw at the top in it's own holder) so you could make the watch run faster or slower, this was soon taken away so now only the finest movemnt has this faeture. You see the little arrow pointing at a small hole on the top of the movement? You press down in this hole to release the winding stem with crown.
 

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Yes, some quartz watches are vintage. I suppose the dividing line, just as with the mechanicals, is age but I am not sure where one draws the line. I would vote for a minimum of 20 years old, which would put the current limit at 1993 or before.....

Thanks for showing that. Nice watch but in view of the innards, not quite my cup of tea.....

Hartmut Richter
 

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Well, I did say "minimum". Some would stick the limit at about 1980 (before the quartz crisis petered out) and keep it there even as time goes on. Maybe one day we will think of "vintage" in terms of different eras: for wrist watches e.g. "converted pocket watches", going to "form watch era (inter war)", going to "modern automatics era (post war)",.....arriving at "post quartz crisis, mechanicals-are-a-luxury/attitude-statement" sort of era.

Hartmut Richter
 

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This has been debated I don't know how many times and there isn't consensus about the line for retro-vintage and antique watches.I believe it's not about the movement, it's rather the age of the timepiece. I consider 1980 and onwards 'retro', backwards 'vintage', 100+ years antique
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Vintage can mean the period something was begun so I say the first generation quartz movement must be considered vintage and the models that came out in the 70's are big and cased in the same cases as Electric or mechanical watches that came befor them. So even if people don't like them it shouldn't make any difference.

I bet that $1 pin lever watches weren't seen as vintage by everyone in the day either but we see them as vintage now.


When you get stuck into quartz watches you soon see the mechanicle wonder in them as everything is so tiny and if yoiu see the electronics as the balance not much differs. I use a microscope when I work on them and they become much more becoming to the eyes. :)
 

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That's a very nice watch. I'm in the 'pre-1990' camp - and this is my only vintage quartz from the 80's:



 

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I have a number of vintage watches from the 1980s. In fact a 1988 Casio sits proudly among my collection of 1950s Omegas and it is just as cherished as they are. I prefer mechanicals but I still respect quartz and like the vintage ones. I think that it is great to see them becoming more appreciated and collectible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
One problem is that it's not that easy to date them so you have to go by the case and movement.

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Here is a Seiko and I believe it's from 1988 but the case has becom more neutral over time (not as nicely rounded as Marrick's beautiful Ogival) and could just as well be from 1998 but it has a nice plastic crystal so I think it's from the 80's. It was all scratched and bubbly but cleared up nicely

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The movement is a beautiful 4 jewel Seiko 8222A. It has the adjustment screw so it's of good quality and even the circuit board is protected. It was a pain getting the stem out though.

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Here is a fun watch from the 70's I just started to work on and I have just gotten it back in working order so now I'll need to clean it up then remove all the scratches from the mineral crystal. This is a typical case design from the 70's and inside is a 4 jewel Hong kong movement with Swiss parts, in the 80's all the low price watches came winth no jewel movements so these older models are the ones to hang on to.

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Nice looking movement stamped with BF 888 on the main plate but I haven't seen this movement before. It doesn't have a guard plate for the main coil like other brands have so it can be broken when you open the back if not careful. It does have the adjustment screw though and 4 jewels.
 

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I know of no collector, not even the richest of them, who has been able to collect the entire range of mechanical watches... from start to modern... in any depth.

But I would say my quartz collection is pretty much representative of the entire history of quartz... from the first thru the major variants to the modern examples. Something like that should make any collector smile, even Luddites! :-d

(One of my donations to the NAWCC is currently the only watch on display that is actually operating - shows off one of the major advantages of quartz. b-))

One suggestion, when claiming 'vintage' status for a quartz timepiece, always post pictures of the movement. Just like with mechanicals, the movement usually tells more than the encasement.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Makes you wonder how they came up with the name but it was a different era in the 70's befor AIDS. I have seen a few other Love Time watches but I don't know if they are still around. I must say that the watch is of good quallity and no simple plastic inlay, rather two screws that hold the movement in the case.
 

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The hair was longer and the collars wider and bell bottoms.
Makes you wonder how they came up with the name but it was a different era in the 70's befor AIDS. I have seen a few other Love Time watches but I don't know if they are still around. I must say that the watch is of good quallity and no simple plastic inlay, rather two screws that hold the movement in the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
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Now it's ready to be sold. I could put down more work on it but you shouldn't go over board with a watch like this as it's more or less worthless and I doubt I'll get more then $4 for it.

The award is that you have brought back a nice watch from the grave and just maby someone will fall in love with it.

(note to self to remember to change the date...)
 
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