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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My fiancee was cleaning out her closet to make some room for me and came across a bag of watches - Seiko - fake Rolex - Gruen - case less Bulova ladies movement and what is to me the "barn find" of the year, a vintage timex hand wind with date and twistoflex band. A couple winds later, it was running.

timex (1).JPG

Stainless steel back and chrome over base metal bezel. It feels so good and disappears while worn. I love my Hamilton mechanical but this is something special. Perhaps it is a time machine that transports me back.

timex (4).JPG I have worn it all day and it was running fast so I opened it up to regulate and clean a bit. Inside the back of the case cover I found NPY and no other markings on the movement. I did notice the hard metal bearings instead of jewels that helped Timex make a durable, reliable, timekeeper for less than the Swiss who used jewels for bearings. Anyway, no serial number or anything to verify the year.

timex (2).JPG

I removed the plastic spacer and stem so I could get a better angle on the adjustment. When I turned over the face I found these numbers that were hidden by the bezel 16550 2373. I think 1950 was the first year for the Timex brand in the US and I am thinking this is one of the first from 1950. I am posting for two reasons. First I am thrilled to have this watch and what it represented to the watch industry and second to hear from any Timex experts.

timex (3).JPG

Finding this in original running condition has really been a wonderful surprise and the first watch that has me leaving my Hamilton on the nightstand.

timex (5).JPG

A great wristwatch experience doesn't have to cost thousands. I understand these old watches a not worth restoring, yet!, but this link to the past must have a place in the hearts of watch lovers. Like the model T Ford the Timex should be lifted up. This one has certainly lifted me and taken me back to a simpler time.
Yes, I had to run the hands round and round to set the date and how many watches reverse the date when you run them backwards.
Also the only visible mark on the face is TIMEX and nothing else. I searched google images and could not find another like it.
I am hopeful to read your comments. Keep on ticking....

Update: This watch has a Model 24 movement
Mod24.jpg First used in 1963
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Found some more information from Budget Watch Collecting: "

Most (possibly all) mechanical Timex watches from 1963 until the end of mechanical production in 1993 have a reference number, usually at the bottom of the dial. The last two numbers correspond to the year the watch was produced. The two (occasionally 3) numbers before that are the movement number, the remaining numbers are the catalog number. For example, 2495210592 would indicate catalog number 24952, movement 105, year 1992. In some cases this number is hidden under the bezel and cannot be viewed without removing the movement from the case.
Some earlier Timexes have an ink-stamped date code on the inside caseback consisting of one letter and one number. The numeral denotes the year of manufacture as follows: 1959-8, 1960-7, 1961-6, 1962-5 1963-4 1964-3 1965-2 1966-1 1967-9.

So this would have a Model 23 movement made in 1973 based on the numbers hidden under the bezel at 6 o'clock.
TimexMod23.jpg However, this watch has a Model 24 movement
Mod24.jpg for sure.

The plot thickens - did Timex mis match during manufacturing using what was on hand or has some watchmaker replaced the original 23 movement with a 24 - or perhaps the face was replaced. So I am back to square one or maybe square 1.5
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi,
Thanks James. The date code 2373 at six o'clock under the bezel does not match the Model 24 movement inside the watch so one or the other has been changed. The movement could be as early as 1963 but the face is 1973. So the watch could be a 1963 model that had a facelift in 1973 or after using parts from another watch.

Regards,
Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi,

To date the watch there should be some numbers under the 6. Sometimes the movement needs to come out to find them. Have a close look with magnification near the case edge.

date

Regards
Well, I am red faced now.....As you suggested I used a loop and low and behold I could read the numbers 2573. The model 25 movement is the same as the 24 but with the date. So my little self induced mystery is solved. I have an original 1973 Timex. Thanks!
 
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I'm glad to see that folks here aren't just concerned about bling. Sometimes the prosaic pieces can be vbery fun. I find that learning what is actually going on inside the case lends a much greater appreciation for the piece as a whole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The thing is, that what was once commonplace has been replaced and as more vintage handwinds are left behind by time, loss of interest and $ value they become rare and treasured. There is something very special about an easy to open back, making adjustments and seeing how those adjustments change the time keeping. Trial and error builds a relationship with the watch, is better for the environment and uses our own bio-mechanical energy for power. I agree with boatdetective that learning about the watch innards and history adds significantly to the experience. Like taking the helm of a steam locomotive the engineer knew everything to keep it running and learned more by each operation. The journey held discovery and was completed only because he knew all the parts and relationships - fire, water, metal, oil, steam, heat, roaring - the machine came alive in the hands of the engineer. now we don't even turn a key to start our cars and soon we won't even be driving them as the wave of autonomous vehicles take over. So please, allow me to continue to wind my watches and control time as it passes on my wrist. It is a simple pleasure - mechanical - analog - untraceable - pure - private - intimate. Not just for telling time accurately, but for running it ourselves. Keep on ticking...
 
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Love the vintage timex manual winds and particularly their dynabeats.

As for servicing? Forget about it. The tightness and simplicity (two plates) make it a pain in the tuckus. Not to mention that dang stem holder.

Still cool pieces though

Sent from my LGLS660 using Tapatalk
 

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I just snagged one of these. Flea market. Paid less that USD20 in local currency (that is not exactly pocket change around here) Movt type 25, year 1971. So this thing cannot be serviced? If cannot they I suppose I will just keep it around until it die its natural death. I do like the form factor because the case is similar to an old watch with Cortebert movement that I have albeit the Timex is base metal cased while the Trident is ss. Part of dial real estate has discolored a bit but that does not bother me much. One good thing is that it is accurate, I mean acceptably accurate for something this old. I am yet to open the caseback. If it really cannot be serviced that I will just leave it be without ever opening it.
Will be checking PR over the next few days while I let it settle down. Movement a little cranky in the first hour after I first wound it up.

Here is a pic side by side with a similar cased watch. They look like cousins.

P1070224.JPG
 
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