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Dear Friend, i really in need of opinion here
so i just bought this charming waltham 1920, but there is some issue first the crown is broken and secondly the watch run for a good 2 minutes and then stop, and i have to shake it a bit so it could run again, i need to know anything about this watch and is it still worth the money to be fixed ? and if possible cloud any of you guys give me the possible issue why the watch stop and is it expensive to be fixed ?, any help will be great :D
thankyou



 

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This is a 'very-easy-to-work-on' Waltham. The movement is common and used parts are readily available. You can even replace the entire movement with another Waltham of a different jewel count ( yours is a 7 Jewel ) and the dial will still fit. 15 jewel movements were popular, and 17 jewel movements are common as well.

It looks as if your stem will be an easy fix, too. I cannot be sure what type of stem this case uses ( there are 2 distinct styles, one with a screw-in sleeve and another with a stamped-steel collar ), but, either design is common, and replacement parts readily available.

So: your challenge will be to find someone with the parts you need! Repairing this Waltham is very easy...IF the parts are on-hand. You will want to do business with someone who has a good selection of old parts, and who can pick and choose from their assortment what's necessary.

Feel free to message me if you have trouble finding what you need...I have many parts, and will assist where I can.

Michael.
 

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As for the reason why the watch stops: I'm reasonably certain that the oils inside the watch are gummed up due to age. It's very likely that the watch hasn't received a proper service in years, decades even ... and the older oils built a sort of viscous sludge inside the mechanism that the movement needs to work very hard to overcome.

It's a really good sign that despite all this, it is still ticking a bit when gently shaken. Those old movements really can take a beating - hopefully, a cleaning and new oil will make it run again. Plus sorting out the crown like Michael wrote, then you have a true American vintage piece.
 
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