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Hello everybody!

Once again newbie question, hope to hear some useful opinions and advices. Here is the deal, in a few weeks I will receive 2 antique watches Zenith and Junghans WWII Navy model. Both of them probably from 1940-50s era in a good working condition. I need as much information as possible, how hard it is to maintain antique watches, how expensive it is?? What about wearability is it possible to wear antique watches at least few days a week?

Thank you! Really appreciate your help!
 

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Hello everybody!

Once again newbie question, hope to hear some useful opinions and advices. Here is the deal, in a few weeks I will receive 2 antique watches Zenith and Junghans WWII Navy model. Both of them probably from 1940-50s era in a good working condition. I need as much information as possible, how hard it is to maintain antique watches, how expensive it is?? What about wearability is it possible to wear antique watches at least few days a week?

Thank you! Really appreciate your help!
I have often worn vintage 24x7. That's easy...

For the rest 1) get good pics, especially of the movement. 2) post in Vintage where the expertise in vintage is located.

Little can be said about the watches without pics.
 

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As a general rule, you should always service your watches before using them, unless you <really> trust the seller. In NY, service is liable to be pricey (200+ per watch, unless you know a guy).

Don't skimp though; if the service is done properly, you're probalby good for another 10 years of semi-active use. I don't tend to trust waterproofing on watches older then I am. I wear mine daily, but since I have a dozen or so that I rotate through, a given watch usually doesn't get more then a week or two a month.

Beyond that, it depends on the watch. Gold plated or filled watches should be kept clean; after 50 years, the plating is liable to be thin. If there's any brassing (spots where the base metal is showing through), try not to get the case sweaty; it'll start to eat at the base metal. Re-plating might be in order in that case. Solid gold or stainless cases don't have as big a problem with that. Most wristwatches have plastic crystals; these scratch easily, but can be polished easily too. Accuracy on these should be in the order of +/- 10-30 seconds / day, but a lot depends on how well it was maintained. If they're manual wind, get in the habit of winding it at the same time every day; that'll help even out the variance a bit, especially if it was properly regulated during service. When you take them off at night, find a place to put them where they aren't sitting in dust. Watches warm up when they're on your wrist, and when they cool down at night, they "inhale" ('cause the air inside the watch contracts). If they're on a dusty surface, they'll breath in dust, which will shorten their lifespan. If you notice the watch suddenly speeding up or slowing down, get it serviced immediately.

Ran out of thoughts, will come back if I think of anything else. :)
 
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