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Ok, folks. I have a PAM homage that I want to pick apart somewhat, and aside from getting the crown guard, straps and caseback off, I've no clue where to start. I have a decent set of watch tools just purchased, and would like to open remove the movement, dial and hands, and put it all back together. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!
 

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Kind of hard to talk ya through it.
You could start here:
watch repair guide - Watch Parts | Esslinger and Company
Google up some books, too. Go slow and if you find yourself getting frustrated, walk away for a while.
Here's to hoping you succeed in your first foray.....

Josh
 

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I wanted to learn more about movements so I signed up for the Timezone schools:

TimeZone Watch School Home

I found them very useful. I've worked my way through quite a few movements now based on this starting information.

No chronographs yet...
 

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Ok, folks. I have a PAM homage that I want to pick apart somewhat, and aside from getting the crown guard, straps and caseback off, I've no clue where to start. I have a decent set of watch tools just purchased, and would like to open remove the movement, dial and hands, and put it all back together. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!
That's a good way to learn more about how watches are constructed. However I would not use a functioning watch to learn on. Clearances are tight, parts small and one slight slip of the screwdriver can turn a hairspring into a useless birds nest or leave a permanent scratch. You should start with a non-functioning complete junker watch. Before starting you should read up on watch and movement construction.
 

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That's a good way to learn more about how watches are constructed. However I would not use a functioning watch to learn on. Clearances are tight, parts small and one slight slip of the screwdriver can turn a hairspring into a useless birds nest or leave a permanent scratch. You should start with a non-functioning complete junker watch. Before starting you should read up on watch and movement construction.
Well, it is a HOMAGE he's working on.

esides, if you start with a working watch you will know if you got it back together correctly or not!
 

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Well, it is a HOMAGE he's working on.

esides, if you start with a working watch you will know if you got it back together correctly or not!
Why not buy a functioning Chinese movement for 15 bucks or so..... Start there?
 

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Well, it is a HOMAGE he's working on.

esides, if you start with a working watch you will know if you got it back together correctly or not!
Whether it is a knockoff or not is beside the point. It runs now. In the hands of a would-be watch disassembler there is a good chance it may not.
 

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Whether it is a knockoff or not is beside the point. It runs now. In the hands of a would-be watch disassembler there is a good chance it may not.
And if it doesn't, what's wrong with that? If it's a watch he's not going to use, isn't interested in reselling, and can afford the potential loss of a running watch, what's the big deal with taking it apart? Who knows what's gone wrong with a junker, with a function watch you'll know what what you see is what's supposed to be seen.
 

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And if it doesn't, what's wrong with that? If it's a watch he's not going to use, isn't interested in reselling, and can afford the potential loss of a running watch, what's the big deal with taking it apart? Who knows what's gone wrong with a junker, with a function watch you'll know what what you see is what's supposed to be seen.
Since we do not know the answer to any of the IFs you posed we should not be advising a beginner to learn watch disassembly and reassembly on a relatively new functioning watch. That is poor advice on a watch forum. He has little or no information about how to take it apart and put it back together. If he was in a classroom or supervised situation it could make sense.
 

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Since we do not know the answer to any of the IFs you posed we should not be advising a beginner to learn watch disassembly and reassembly on a relatively new functioning watch. That is poor advice on a watch forum. He has little or no information about how to take it apart and put it back together. If he was in a classroom or supervised situation it could make sense.
And, interestingly, I'm not the one advising him one way or the other. He suggested taking it apart - you're the one who advised him not to, despite all those IFs.

On a more casual note - I've always found that an inquisitive person can learn an immense amount simply by taking things apart, putting them slowly back together (if they can), and reading books and technical guides as they go. First hand, personal experience in a great teacher, and classes aren't available to everyone.
 

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That all said, people have different comfort levels - myself, I've been taking things apart and hap-hazzardly putting them back together since I was 6. Most things barely worked afterwards, but I learned a lot.
 

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If one wishes to learn how things work, it is best to start with something that works.....

If you start with something that does not work and after you have disassembled and reassembled it and it still does not work, did you do something wrong, or is it just in the same shape it was in when you started?
 

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Knowledge is what you get when you read the instructions, experience is what you get when you don't.

OP: Go for it. If you don't get it back together properly there's no great loss. That watch is worth more as a teaching tool for you from the tone of your post.
 

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I've found it invaluable to take photos at every step during disassembly. One poster suggested putting back together slowly. I'd advise the opposite. Take it apart slowly. Document the process.

To keep all the parts together, I purchased pill-trays at the drug store. These are the ones for organizaing pills for a week. Two trays will provide enough compartments to group the parts together by area for easier reassembly.

Don't mix up all the parts if you want to get it back together.

As a cheap watch workbench, I use a plastic storage bin sitting on a regular height desk. Choose one with a lip around the edge - this will help to capture parts that roll or spring out of tweezers.

A good light, good tweezers, good screw drivers and a loupe...

...enjoy!
 

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Ok, folks. I have a PAM homage that I want to pick apart somewhat, and aside from getting the crown guard, straps and caseback off, I've no clue where to start. I have a decent set of watch tools just purchased, and would like to open remove the movement, dial and hands, and put it all back together. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!
Is it one of those 6497 clones? If so, it's a good start to browse the web for how-to's on dissembling a 6497 .

If you are ready to run the risk of damaging the movement, I believe the next step after removing the caseback is removing the stem (done different ways depending on the movement, which you need to exactly identify first ). On 649* type there is a very small screw that you unscrew just a bit, very very carefully ...setting stem screw...it allows the stem to be released. If you unscrew too much, the mechanism falls apart inside, and will require re-assembly by someone qualified. Next step would be to uncase the movement. Depending on the specific movement and how someone mounted it into the case.......some have mounting hardware screws and tabs, like on 649x.....
 

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I say give it a crack :-! There's a heap of info in the watchmaking & affordables forum on WUS regarding the 6497/8 clones. I've modded a couple of watches & stuffed up some movements, hands etc but the clones cheap & readily available online. Google is your friend & dont forget youtube. Dont know if there still there but I found some clips a while ago on how to remove/install movemnts, hands, dial etc. Good luck mate & have fun!
 

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Ok, folks. I have a PAM homage that I want to pick apart somewhat, and aside from getting the crown guard, straps and caseback off, I've no clue where to start. I have a decent set of watch tools just purchased, and would like to open remove the movement, dial and hands, and put it all back together. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

thanks!
The consensus seems to be it's ok to disassemble the watch. Here's a short of things to consider during disassembly.

1. You will need a good case opener to unscrew the case back if it is threaded. Otherwise a case knife or stout bladed knife will pop the back off.
2. You will need a set of small jewelers screwdrivers.
3. Once the back is off remove the crown.
4. Once the screws holding the movement are removed it should pretty much slide out. The screw slots are quite shallow so be sure the screwdriver fits the head and sits squarely in the slot.
5. Once the movement is out I'm sure there will be a temptation to keep going and take the movement down. If you decide to go that route either take or draw pictures as you go.
6.Here's an interesting link that describes disassembly of a simple chinese watch movement. How To Mechanical Watch Movement
7. Be very careful handling the movement and keep fingers away from the dial and balance wheel.
8. Jewelers tweezers and a loupe are very helpful tools. The parts are very small and once dropped onto a floor or carpet they may be lost for a long time. Work slowly at a flat well lit table and put parts into a container as you go.
9. Reassembly is simply reversing the steps you took to take it apart.
 
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