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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I'd happily send it to Christian if he was interested in giving me a quote. I have very much enjoyed his forensic recording of services, and would love to see an account of this old watch done like that.

It needs a new hour hand and I would like a new crown and crystal. The original crown was replaced in the sixties with a gold filled non omega one. The gold skin has peeled off that. I still have it, but it is worn. The crystal is a bit battered - not too bad, but it's not great and as I said in a post up above, the hour hand snapped off and I soldered it back on. That was a bizarre happening.I was just setting the time and the hour hand clashed with the minute one. next thing I knew as I spun the crown, the hour hand broke and was dangling like a broken wing by a thread from the boss in the centre. My repair is crude but functional I'm no jeweller so it ain't great. It needs a new hand or more likely a set of hands. I don't suppose you can get them singly. The hand are solid gold as is the rest of the case (18ct).
Couple of caveats here - the watch might be working well because it is swimming in oil. This can hide a lot of wear and tear, so it is quite possible that once taken apart, a fair amount of damage comes to light. There is only limited availability of spares, and you might end up having to look for a watch on eBay to use for spares ...

If you let me know the case number (and if you have it, the calibre number), I can check if I can get some hands for it. Let's first see what is available in terms of spares.

Also, there is the danger that oil will get onto the dial during transport. In the best case, that leaves ugly spots on the dial, and, in the worst case, it dissolves parts of it.

Let me have the case number if you have it and we'll take it from there.
 

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Hi Christian.There is no danger from surplus oil in this case.

The switch cleaner used is about 98% butane volatiles. The dial is clean too.

The case number is 10746009 Solid 18ct gold

The movement number is 10622794

The caliber is rather harder to tell. I believe it is a 28.10 bumper made before 1947, probably about 1945/1946.

These seem to have been made some with centre seconds and some with sub seconds. This one is a centre seconds one.

After 1947 a different caliber number was used to refer to these movements. They are known as 340 and 341. My researches lead me to believe that the 341 caliber were the Jubilee Chronometers. Mine is not one of the Jubilee Chronometers. they were stamped differently.

This points at mine being a 340. Also, inside this pdf file: http://users.tpg.com.au/mondodec//Omega_Constellation_Gene_Pool.pdfis a set of drawings showing caliber differences.

Mine is just like the cal 340, so I think that is the one I have. The photo below is at quite a high resolution if your browser will let you view it at full res, you will be able to compare with the drawings in that pdf above. If not, download it and you can view it full res that way.

Turquoise Watch accessory Watch Analog watch Fashion accessory


AS photographed the watch is attached to a non - Omega 18ct strap. I have removed this. My father ill-advisedly in my view allowed a rogue jeweller to replace the original heavy weight Omega grains of rice strap with a much lighter one 'free of charge' when the original strap needed a repair. This conman took the original strap as payment for the work which consisted of his swapping the two straps, thus netting the villain a fine profit for pulling a couple of spring bars. This ruined the original watch in my view and I won't have that strap on it. It has a leather strap now.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Now I'm getting a bit forensic - you know how people rave on about the perfect donut of oil sitting in the jewel ...

First photo is of a jewel that was oiled exactly 30 minutes before taking the photo, using Moebius 9010 oil.

Pink Close-up Macro photography Magenta Nail
I'm referring to the jewel at 10 o'clock of the big hole through which you can see a double wheel. I can't see even the slightest trace of oil. It's all gone down the pivot. Not a trace in sight. Just to show what it looks like with oil, I reapply oil to the jewel again:
Pink Close-up Macro photography Water Magenta
Now we can rave on again about the "perfect donut" - until it's all gone down the pinion again in 30 minutes ;-)

My guess here is that the only thing that counts is an oil layer of a molecule or two - that hopefully sits between the jewel hole surface and the pinion. The "donut" on top guaranteeing constant exposure to oil is very nice when seen in pretty drawings in pretty books - in fact in every book about watch maintenance.

Too bad I can't see it under my microscope after half an hour.
 

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OK - that's clear then.

All the more reason not to run watches after their recommended service interval without having attention given them.
 

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Now we can rave on again about the "perfect donut" - until it's all gone down the pinion again in 30 minutes ;-)

My guess here is that the only thing that counts is an oil layer of a molecule or two - that hopefully sits between the jewel hole surface and the pinion. The "donut" on top guaranteeing constant exposure to oil is very nice when seen in pretty drawings in pretty books - in fact in every book about watch maintenance.

Too bad I can't see it under my microscope after half an hour.
Just reading this thread again Wilderbeest, and I wondered if the donut was a feature of the older types of oil. The Moebius oil you are testing with may be much finer - I don't know, it just occurs to me that it may have qualitative differences that make it spread unless the watch maker uses epilame or something to stop it moving off its station. If you did that test again with old fashioned watch oils, I wonder if it might have hung around longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Just reading this thread again Wilderbeest, and I wondered if the donut was a feature of the older types of oil. The Moebius oil you are testing with may be much finer - I don't know, it just occurs to me that it may have qualitative differences that make it spread unless the watch maker uses epilame or something to stop it moving off its station. If you did that test again with old fashioned watch oils, I wonder if it might have hung around longer.
I'll give that a go - I have some "normal" fine watch oil.

The use of epilame is very restriced - e.g. on some auto winder parts on a Rolex and is used to avoid the oil getting to a certain place. I haven't heard of epilame being used around pivots to prevent the oil from sliding down it.

A very interesting subject, and I will do some more research with mineral oils.
 

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I bought a Parnis watch and after a few days found it was very difficult to wind, I needed to hold the crown with a small pair of pliers. I had heard stories of these watches being shipped with no lubrication so I simply pulled the crown out and put in a few drops of oil which came with an electric hair trimmer. Since then it has been fine, it winds normally and the accuracy is fantastic.
 
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