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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive had my Steelfish for 4 days now, and it seems to be running pretty fast. Ive tried 4 positions as follows:

Face up: +7.5 sec/day
Face down: +8 sec/day

Opposite side of crown: 14-15 sec/day
Crown side: didnt get the exact figure right, but similar to the other side.

I know there is talk of "break in" and stuff, but this seems excessively fast..

Any suggestions? Should I call the dealer?
 

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Patience grasshopper. Revisit this in 3 months. Waiting a while for it to "settle" is best served here.

Todd
 

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My Steelfish was similar for the first few months but now (I've had it for 6 months) it keeps near perfect time.

I went from thinking that having to adjust the time once a week was part of the fun of a mechanical watch to being shocked at how close it stays to my atomic clock.

Just in case you are curious, I wear mine most days, take it off at night and rest it face up.

Enjoy your watch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My Steelfish was similar for the first few months but now (I've had it for 6 months) it keeps near perfect time.

I went from thinking that having to adjust the time once a week was part of the fun of a mechanical watch to being shocked at how close it stays to my atomic clock.

Just in case you are curious, I wear mine most days, take it off at night and rest it face up.

Enjoy your watch!
I guess ill hang in there then. My colt was +1 second straight after the first wind. I was very impressed. maybe I just expect too much too quickly now.
 

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Ahhh when you pause to think about it we are talking 2 seconds or 16 beats of deviation over the entire day to be outside of COSC specs. That is 16 over ~691200 or 0.00231% deviation over the expected 0.00694% deviation allowed by the COSC spec. Its not much of a "settle down" when you analyse it, is it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I get the point, but isnt 15 sec/day outside of cosc guidelines on its own? I assume any watch with 15/day at any point, would not pass. So how is it that after passing, it ends up at 15?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Let me put my answer in the form of a question.. is the watch averaging +15/day or recording this deviation when it is left in one particular position for and extended period of time?
It seems to be half during the day while im wearing it, and half at night while it sits, while being placed face up or face down.

When placing it on the non-crown side, it was about +10-11 sec over about an 11 hour period (plus about 4-5 sec while wearing it for a 15 sec/day total).
 

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This is still a very new watch and just a few days into its 100year life expentancy. I'd give it some weeks of regular wear and lets see what you report after about a month or two of normal daily use. That the watch may gain a minute per week is quite normal for mechanical watches. Better early then late. I could go into a long explanation about how movements are designed to average changes in momentum over a given period but time is against me this morning in the real sense. I'll check in later.
 

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I get the point, but isnt 15 sec/day outside of cosc guidelines on its own? I assume any watch with 15/day at any point, would not pass. So how is it that after passing, it ends up at 15?
That certainly seems out of COSC specs to me as well. +15 sec/day seems well above the -4/+6 range.

And I always wondered about the "breaking in time" as well. The movement was tested and certified before it was broken in. Why should it be out of specs when you receive the watch but correct itself after wearing it for a few weeks or months?

While I might personally believe that this testing and the certificate is more marketing gimmick than anything else, I think the main problem is that the movement wasn't properly regulated or adjusted after it was installed into your watch. The testing is performed on an uncased movement and then it gets shipped back to the manufacturer and installed into its case. Unless it's properly regulated who knows how far it could be off - certificate or not.

I have my own watch timer so it's not a problem to adjust my own watches. My normal process is to adjust it close to what it should be, wear it for a few days and then note how much it's gained or lost and then calculate the rate the watch should be adjusted to. Sometimes a watch might be set exactly to 18,000 or the exact bph for that movement, while other times the "correct" rate will be somewhat different due to how it behaves while I'm wearing it. If you know how many seconds fast or slow your watch is per day averaged over a week, that will help you regulate it exactly for how you wear or use your watch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
And I always wondered about the "breaking in time" as well. The movement was tested and certified before it was broken in. Why should it be out of specs when you receive the watch but correct itself after wearing it for a few weeks or months?

Thats exactly what ive been trying to get to the bottom of..

Like, did they have to break it in before the cosc testing?:think:
 

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No they don't break it in before COSC testing.

The point is each owner wears his time piece in his own individual manner. When setting the regulation of the watch one can't know if you are going to be a very active sports person on the go 20 hours a day or a sedentary office desk jockey. Your movement must average its gains and losses daily to give you a close approximation of the period of time that has passed since you last looked at your watch. If you were flying an F18 for 2 hours or flying your desk for 2 hours the watch may just give you a different reading.
Reason, different forces exerted on the organs of the movement during that period.

Your watch is designed to average the forces received during normal wear. If you leave it for 10 hours in one position it, as a very new movement set slightly fast, will accumulate its positive "error" and show you just how much that "error" is by being X seconds "fast". Well its not fast. Its just allowed to accumulate the bias set by the watch maker to over come new movement performance expected from a production watch. It has to be allowed from that point(when it leaves the workbench fully assembled) to run and be observed by the new owner so that is can be, possibly, re-regulated to accommodate the new owner's wearing/usage habit. It may well be that if you use the watch in a different manner it would be only a second per month fast!! This brings me to the break in period. This runs concurrently with your first weeks of ownership. The complex interaction between movement components, inertia, acceleration, deceleration, torsion and torque of the components in a non static environment are designed for but not perfectly executed within every movement that comes off the work bench. Putting a new movement through the real world allows the components to work against each other. Just think of something "simple" like drumming out a beat while listening to live music at a concert. Thats is normal wear and tear for a movement. But I can guarantee you that the watchmaker did not test for this when he assembled your watch!! COSC simulated shock and stress and temperature variation along with positional changes but it did not put your movement through a 10 minute drum solo!! Cappish??

COSC is a recoginised bench mark. The movement meets or exceeds the bench mark when assembled and run against strictly defined environmental variables. It is not a real world test. What it gives is a statistical bench mark against every other movement put through the same set of tests. It is compared and judged to be of Chronometer standard at that point. The movement can then be put into a case fit for 1 meter of submersion or 1000 meters of submersion. Different operating environments don't you think? Same movement. Different expectations of usage over the long run. Different settings may be applied to the movement on the workbench in anticipation of what the watch is going to be used for. Just different. Not broken. You have to see how the watch is going to perform over time for the way that you use it , during the break in period, then have it regulated to how you expect it to perform, not anybody else because they may well get a different result.
 
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