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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
:think:Does anyone use a watch winder? I'm sure the answer will be yes.:think: I didn't see anything posted about this before.
  1. How did you pick it?
  2. Do they differ?
  3. What kind should I use for a Doxa?
  4. Will this hurt it?
  5. Does Doxa recommend one?
 

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This is an excellent question. :-! I for one don’t use one.

For me the question is does it hurt the movement in the long run? I think I like the fact when I sit it back in the tube it goes to sleep. I know this is like apples and oranges, but I am going to say it. Sort of like a car would you allow your car to never shut off? :oops:

Let’s say you buy a Doxa and never wear it, but decide after five years to pull it out of the tube and put it on. The other scenario would be that you have never worn it but had it on a winder for five years. What watch is in a better position:-s Not sure if we can get a real good answer here but I put it out their.

:thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think we'll see many answers to this. I've heard it's bad to let it stop becuase you are always starting and stopping and this can lead to wear on the crown from screwing it in and out. I would imagine shaking the watch like crazy to start it can't be real great for the watch.:think:

I think many winders are also different. Some shake the watch and some move side to side. I believe the Rolex winder stops from time to time?

To many choices. :think::roll:

Chris
 

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My experience with cars is, if they are stored for long periods of time they have more problems rather than if they are driven once a week. With watches we'll probably get a 50 50 response. I like to use winders because my watches are always ready to wear. It keeps the lubricant moving in the watch. My winder has speed sets and clockwise and counter clockwise settings that can be adjusted to the manufacturers specs (I don't know what Doxa suggests):think:. I personally feel that is not that important as long as the watch moves. My guess is that my winder runs about 10% of the time, which is not much and this is a more gentle movement than if it was actually worn. I am curious as to what others think also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great info. What you say makes perfect sense. The fact that you can adjust your's takes us in the right direction. That will solve some of the issues I was thinking about.
 

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I have an Orbita winder which was given to me by a friend who is a Rolex dealer. That is the brand they recommend. I had to send it in for repair (very unusual for that to happen) because I could hear the motor and Orbita provided excellent customer service. The Orbita winder turns the watch 360 degrees and then it swings from side to side.
 

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It's not good to have an automatic watch not running for extended periods of time due to the lubricants "pooling". Also, by not using a winder, you put alot of unnecessary wear on the crown/stem each time you unscrew it, wind it and set the date.

Mines always on a winder or my wrist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was guessing that it was a good idea to use one. I guess the next question is which one? I suppose it's subjective but I'm curious what everyone is using if they are using one.

Thanks
 

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I have an Orbita winder which was given to me by a friend who is a Rolex dealer. That is the brand they recommend. I had to send it in for repair (very unusual for that to happen) because I could hear the motor and Orbita provided excellent customer service. The Orbita winder turns the watch 360 degrees and then it swings from side to side.
I can assure you, from what I have seen these are up there with the best. However, they are fairly expensive..........
 

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I use 3 different watchwinders and they work pretty well. I think it is better for a fine precision watch to be moving and not sitting letting the lubricants collect and gel.

Check out: http://www.orbita.net/pages/17104.htm for an excellent table on different brand watches, what direction to wind them and what speed. DOXA is included!
 

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I use a Wolf Designs Single Head Winder. The most important function that a good watch winder must have is "fuzzy logic" controls. These enable the winder to run in different modes, 20 minutes clockwise, rest, 20 minutes counter-clockwise for 20 minutes. Mine will do that for 4 hours and then go into sleep mode for 15 hours. Different companies use different modes and cycles. This "sleep" or "rest" mode is very important to avoid overwinding the watch. Cheaper units will run continuously and can cause some real damage to a watch.
The main advantage of a winder is that your watch, say it be your evening watch or your Sunday watch or your work-out watch..., is always at the ready for your wrist. This in turn does eliminate the possible wear on your crown.
As for the pooling of lubricants is concerned, this may be a valid point. Although I do not think letting your watch sit, if in a controlled environment, is necessarily bad. I own a 1968 Rolex Submariner that sat in a drawer for over 10 years. When it was given to me by my father I had it Rolex serviced. No parts needed to be replaced. I still to this day only break out the Submariner on very special occasions and it always keeps perfect time, I mean perfect! It is never on a winder. It is stored in it's original box.
Bottom line-winders are great if you want your watch to always be set. But make sure you don't skimp and get a cheap one.
;-)
 

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I have an Orbita winder, and I've been very happy with it. One thing to keep in mind when buying is to match the winder to the watch. Orbita's are great because they very flexible in the settings, # of turns per day, clockwise/counterclockwise/ both, so you can tailor it to different watches. Doxa SUBs need 650 TPD, both directions.

I've been looking for a cheaper alternative to Orbita lately since I just want a functional winder, not a nice box. But I haven't found a good one. I've heard that some of Steinhausen winders are pretty good (but not all).
 

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I have an Orbita winder, and I've been very happy with it. One thing to keep in mind when buying is to match the winder to the watch. Orbita's are great because they very flexible in the settings, # of turns per day, clockwise/counterclockwise/ both, so you can tailor it to different watches. Doxa SUBs need 650 TPD, both directions.

I've been looking for a cheaper alternative to Orbita lately since I just want a functional winder, not a nice box. But I haven't found a good one. I've heard that some of Steinhausen winders are pretty good (but not all).

Which Orbita do you have??
 

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Which Orbita do you have??
I've got the Bellino. You can usually find them at retailers and online for about 25% off list price, or $300.
 

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I use a Wolf Designs Single Head Winder. The most important function that a good watch winder must have is "fuzzy logic" controls. These enable the winder to run in different modes, 20 minutes clockwise, rest, 20 minutes counter-clockwise for 20 minutes. Mine will do that for 4 hours and then go into sleep mode for 15 hours.
;-)
Yep, make sure it has Fuzzy Logic control.
If you know what you are looking for you can get a good deal on ebay. I got mine from ebay and it has been great. Winds 4 watches on 2 double head winders. Cherrywood design and runs great.
I use one because I like to wear my watches straight away without always resetting dates and time.
IMO I think that resetting the watch from not working does put alot of stress on the crown stem.
Also I am pretty sure that DOXA uses synthetic lubricants so the likelyhood of the lubricant pooling or varnishing does not happen for over a decade if not at all, if you choose to let it wind down and not wear it for a while.
As for car comparisons, cars need to be driven regularly to keep components & seals lubricated (and soft for the seals that is). If you leave cars sitting to long that is when they start causing all sorts of problems. However, watches IMO are more closely related to a manual transmissions without the petrolium based lubricant. Apart from seal problems and driver abuse the manual transmission is pretty tough, they can sit for a long time or be driven for a long time.
In a winder the watch should theoretically be more worn in and keep good time. But as I said it is more a convienince thing with me.
Will the gears wear? Sure they will. Will you notice it? I doubt it, I have a 67-68 vintage DOXA Sub that appears to be keeping better time than the rest of my collection and it has seen many years of work.

You can go either way, you just may prefer the convienince of the winder.
If you let it wind down just be real gentle when resetting the time.

My 2c
 

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I have a Wolf, single head too. Mine's about two years old...has been running constantly, and has never given me any trouble. It was a gift, otherwise I probably wouldn't have one.

Right now the Tag Heuer Super Professional is on it, and I alternate the TH with the IWC. My DOXA is worn daily and the LV Sub is worn most Sundays. The Sea-Dweller gets worn three or four times a week as my gym watch. The rest of the collection, I'm not worried if they sit for a while. I probably give them a good winding about every other month.
 

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I was just on Fleabay, and was looking at Wolf Winders. I found this to be very interesting information, posted in the description of one of the Wolf Winders. It makes perfect sense (the info about the mainspring)

"In active mode the watch winder runs for 20 minutes clockwise, then pauses briefly and winds 20 minutes counter-clockwise, and then rests for 70 minutes. This on off cycling continues for 7 hours. Then the watch winder goes into a 17 hour Dormant (sleep) cycle. This critical sleep cycle allows the mainspring to almost completely unwind, thus simulating the natural winding and unwinding which occurs with normal wear. This prevents the mainspring from loosing its resiliency. Winding constantly would damage the watches rotor and mainspring. Cheap Watch Winders which run constantly 24/7 are guaranteed to destroy your fine automatic watch."

I need to invest in a good winder.........
 
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