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The watch showcased on SeaGull's website front page has two balances. I believe one is in a tourbillon arrangement. Why would it have a second balance?
 

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The watch showcased on SeaGull's website front page has two balances. I believe one is in a tourbillon arrangement. Why would it have a second balance?
It's a double tourbillon watch. It has two slightly different styles of tourbillon.

Why? Because they could ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
It's a double tourbillon watch. It has two slightly different styles of tourbillon.

Why? Because they could ;-)
So one balance times the watch and the other just spins around for decoration?

...he asked sarcastically.

Followup: Wikipedia seems to offer some insight into this.
 

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So one balance times the watch and the other just spins around for decoration?

...he asked sarcastically.

Followup: Wikipedia seems to offer some insight into this.
Yeh; decoration only would be kind of pointless ;-)

It seems that double; triple and quadruple tourbillons are all tied together via some sort of differential gear system to distribute the torque(delivered from the main spring) evenly.
These and even the triaxial toubillon complications are done from the pure engineering aspect as it is doubtful that they provide any superior timekeeping than a standard escapement type of movement.
 

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That's a pretty good summary of the situation. While may be of dubious benefit, the mere fact that both tourbillons occilate and rotate indicates that they are both equally functioning as integral parts of the movement.
 

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I'm obsessed with the Ingersoll Astor. It's gorgeous. I'm not ready to pay its going rate of $350 ($175 is a more appropriate price to me), but I'm obsessed.

 

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I'm obsessed with the Ingersoll Astor. It's gorgeous. I'm not ready to pay its going rate of $350 ($175 is a more appropriate price to me), but I'm obsessed.

Those watches are terrifyingly huge in real life. Don't get one unless you don't mind being noticed.

It's worth pointing out for the benefit of those who don't know; the Shanghai movement in the Ingersoll Astor is not a tourbillon. There are two functioning escapements but no rotating action. Ingersoll do offer a Shanghai 'orbital' tourbillon but it costs several thousands of dollars.
 

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My wrist safely supports up to 48mm without being ridiculous, so a 47mm would be fine.

Even though the second balance is purely cosmetic (or perhaps it alone drives the seconds hand), I find it quite fetching, if not mechanically interesting.
 

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My wrist safely supports up to 48mm without being ridiculous, so a 47mm would be fine.

Even though the second balance is purely cosmetic (or perhaps it alone drives the seconds hand), I find it quite fetching, if not mechanically interesting.
Like the dual tourbillons; I suspect that both balances are functional and linked together through a torque sharing differential.
 

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Just a point of clarification:

A balance wheel does not 'drive' anything. It allows energy from the mainspring to 'escape' through the escape-wheel allowing the entire train (2nd, 3rd and 4th wheels) to move. Whether the hands are connected to mainspring via the train (as in a conventional 4 wheel train) or independently connected to the mainspring (as in a Roskopf train) makes no difference to the functioning of the balance wheel.

So therefore it doesn't matter how many balance-wheels a movement has, so long as they all occillate in the conventional way (and there is only one mainspring) they are all contributing something to the timekeeping of the entire movement.
 
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