WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello members of the Watchuseek forum,

Let me just take a moment to introduce myself. My name is Marek and I am a manager of a rapidly expanding repair centre based in West London, UK. We currently are the official warranty service centre for nine Swiss brands, and are planning on expanding to 12 by the new year. We are also a repair centre for some of Britain's best known high-street jewellery shop chains, and some of its well respected independent jewellers. I don't want to go into detail about the repair centre too much, as I am here to discuss workshops, and not to advertise.

While we have a strong ambition to become one of the largest repair centres in Britain, we have great respect for the art of watchmaking, and we want to provide a working environment that is worthy of the best watchmakers. We are looking to expand to a new property and will essentially have a clean slate for interior design of the workshop. If you could provide some details as to what makes a great watchmaker's haven, I'd love to hear some ideas.

If you have experience of a watchmaker's workshop done well, please advise me on what made that place of work special. Also, as I am not a watchmaker myself, please don't be afraid to point out what might seem obvious to a watchmaker.

The property we are planning to move into has large windows and plenty of natural light. I hear that this is often an important factor in a workshop.

We currently have two Swiss-spec watchmaking desks, all the necessary machinery, and a polishing machine (which would need its own space).

Thanks in advance for your help on this.

Best,
Marek
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
yes you're right

polishing room needs to be separate
cleaning room needs to be separate
clients should not come in contact with the watchmakers
air pressure must be available also the vacuum machine.
microscope is a must
witschi machines (analyzer q1 watch expert, proofmaster and printer or analyzer twin will exchange the first two)
lista cabinets for keeping spare parts organized(with plastic boxes)
separate space for receiving the watches(to avoid dust in the workshop)
good service management software
good storage of watches received under repair
good ventilation of air
and last and most important BIG STOCK OF SPARE PARTS!!!


BR
emso
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your response emso.

Just to give you an idea, we have a lot of the actual equipment which you list, as we are an already functioning service centre.
Witschi Q Test & Watch Expert
Sigma SM 8810 Compressor
Calypso Water Resistance Tester
UV Lamp
Quantrex Q140 Ultrasonic Tank
Greiner Vibrograf ACS 900
Polishing Machine
Bergeon Hot Air Dryer
Elma Cyclomat

Plus a full stock of casing and hand tools.

In addition we have a very large stock of genuine parts for three quality Swiss brands, and access to parts for many more.

----


I'm more interested in your thoughts about polishing and cleaning, and the general environment of the workshop. Are you saying that in an ideal workshop there needs to be three rooms? One for repair, one for polishing and another for cleaning?

I was advised by a Rolex repairer that polishing rooms should have a sink inside. Do you agree that a sink is necessary?

Are there any more suggestions like this that I should be considering?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
yes a sink would be advisable as you will loose a lot of time to clean up the case/bracelet after polishing if you dont have sink in your cleaning room(like i dont )
believe it will make the work a lot easier but you can manage it with our it if you buy a steam jet cleaner. Still i advise you if possible to install the sink

regarding the separate rooms if you organize the service center now yes it would be best if you do it like i explained, but if its too much hassle you could make two rooms with watchmakers benches in one and cleaning/polishing room together.

the main goal is to avoid adding dust,dirt and other particles to the watchmakers room. the best way is to:

accept the watches in one room(to avoid the dust from packaging and customers coming in )
transfer to watchmakers room where in separate bench you will dismantle the watches(so all the dirt goes on one workbench far from where the movements are repaired.
the watchmaker will dismantle the watch separating the movement from case/bracelet(movement goes to watchmakers bench case/ bracelet to polishing.
put the spare parts for polishing in an assembling box
polish the case bracelet in polishing room.
afterwards clean them in cleaning room(this way all the dust from polishing stays in the polishing room)
get new clean assembling box for keeping the cleaned parts(case,bracelet,buckle,bezel etc) and give them to the watchmaker.
add the movement to the box and give it to the watchmaker to repair it.

this way you avoid to loose spare parts, adding dirt to the watchmaker room, all the watchmakers benches will be clean.

it would be great if you could employ a person to handle the polishing only as trained watchmakers are pricy and its not ok them to loose time on polishing. and it is a separate job and it must be done perfectly(because you can tell anything you want you did to the customer on the movement but he will be satisfied mostly of outer appearance of the watch). i reccomend that you send your polishing guy to a wostep course on polishing,

this is the perfect way to organize the watchmakers service center but everyone has limits on expences, outer factors (as sink:))and space to organize it best.

anyway it is best to listen to the rolex person responsible for authorizing your shop.


br
emso

p.s it could be best if you watch this video and try to steal some hint from them:

How Patek Philippe Services & Repairs Watches - YouTube
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
With regards to the Patek Philippe video, do you advise 14 days for testing like they do? It is our experience that 72 hours on test is sufficient.

Anybody have any other ideas about what would make their life easier if they could have any workshop they desire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also, do you have any recommendation for microscopes that should be used? What about digital microscopes for display on computer monitors?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Also, do you have any recommendation for microscopes that should be used? What about digital microscopes for display on computer monitors?
no theyre not good, you can use them to take pictures when your watch comes tpo service but not for repair.
you should use Zeiss stemi dv4 ( Shop - Zeiss DV4 - boley GmbH ) or Leica microscopes, i have worked on both of those and they're excelent, about others i cannot tell as i have not tried them.
sorry for posting the link i dont know if it is allowed, if not please moderator delete it.
regarding the testing no i test them only how much is the power reserve, wind it by hand test the power reserve, then wound by machine and after that test the power reserve usually 72 hours is enough.




br
emso
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top