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I have just change my SMP200 Battery and the Gasket looks fine, and the case back is a screwdown caseback , my question is , with this alone will the watch still be water resistant ? or should i get it checked out ? Thanks guys
 

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How old is the gasket?

Gasket degradation isn't just dry rot or cracking. Gaskets will exhibit "compression set" over time, which reduces their sealing effectiveness. Pliability can also degrade (rubber hardens).

If you intend to actually take it in the water (swimming, even showering), I'd get it checked.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How old is the gasket?

Gasket degradation isn't just dry rot or cracking. Gaskets will exhibit "compression set" over time, which reduces their sealing effectiveness. Pliability can also degrade (rubber hardens).

If you intend to actually take it in the water (swimming, even showering), I'd get it checked.
yeah i probably will end up pressure testing it and having it re-sealed :)
 

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I imagine that, if the gasket and mating surfaces (gasket recess and case back) are clean, the gasket is relatively new (no more than a few years old) undamaged, and very lightly lubed to prevent distortion as you screw on the back, the watch will be water resistant, as in showering, swimming etc. But I wouldn't trust its pressure resistance (ie for snorkeling or diving) without having someone test it.
 

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Checking always makes sense especially on more expensive watch.
If your 20$ Casio/Timex leak... so not much of the loss considering price of getting them checked it's cheaper to get a new one.
For anything worthy don't take chances.
I think half of the stories about going to pool with 300m WR min kind of originate from some relative/friend/whoever who replaced battery/ been wearing same watch for decades ...
 

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I always replace o-rings when changing batteries. They're cheap and readily available. Even so, they aren't as fragile as we're often led to believe and should last many years. Nitrile rubber is very resilient and durable and used extensively in industrial and aeronautical applications. Provided the o-ring is in good condition and caseback is snugged down correctly (no need for gorilla torque) I can see no reason at all why WR should be compromised. This is one area where DIY is as good or better than some ham-fisted 'professional'. I'd bet good money it would still pass a WR test - but there's only one way to be sure for those of a nervous disposition...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I always replace o-rings when changing batteries. They're cheap and readily available. Even so, they aren't as fragile as we're often led to believe and should last many years. Nitrile rubber is very resilient and durable and used extensively in industrial and aeronautical applications. Provided the o-ring is in good condition and caseback is snugged down correctly (no need for gorilla torque) I can see no reason at all why WR should be compromised. This is one area where DIY is as good or better than some ham-fisted 'professional'. I'd bet good money it would still pass a WR test - but there's only one way to be sure for those of a nervous disposition...
Ah thanks for the info.
 

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Get it pressure tested. It’s not like it was a China special that you could write off if it ended up full of water.
 

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I have just change my SMP200 Battery and the Gasket looks fine, and the case back is a screwdown caseback , my question is , with this alone will the watch still be water resistant ? or should i get it checked out ? Thanks guys
You really don't need to get it checked, and you don't have to spend a fortune. "O" rings cost next to nothing, and a small tub of silicone paste is inexpensive. take the back off, replace the "O" ring, smear a little paste on it, screw up the back (carefully) and all will be OK. Honestly, water pressure testing is expensive, and unnecessary
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You really don't need to get it checked, and you don't have to spend a fortune. "O" rings cost next to nothing, and a small tub of silicone paste is inexpensive. take the back off, replace the "O" ring, smear a little paste on it, screw up the back (carefully) and all will be OK. Honestly, water pressure testing is expensive, and unnecessary
Ah thanks for the help.
 

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Nothing can replace a simple pressure test to provide peace of mind. All of mine are tested yearly when I go to town.

Since you posted I'll offer some take it or leave it advice. When you open a watch for any reason it pays to have a little container of silicon gasket lube handy. The lube is not necessarily used to make the seal better, it is a lubricant and it helps the case back - case and O ring to slide during the retightening of the back plate. Dry O rings can and will at times buckle which not only will allow the watch to gather moisture but shards of the torn O ring can become lodged in a movement. Always lube a ring after inspecting with loupe to insure it is without issues.

My second bit of advice regards the tightening of both case backs and crowns. When you are tightening connections separated by a rubber or synthetic rubber O ring overtightening is just as harmful to the seal as under tightening. Over tightening will not improve the seal. It will however compress the gaskets to such a point that they will need replaced more frequently.

Crown tighteners are notorious for cranking them down to the point they are about to strip the threads. Snug is good, that's when you stop, don't go for the extra half rotation..............
 

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I always replace o-rings when changing batteries. They're cheap and readily available. Even so, they aren't as fragile as we're often led to believe and should last many years. Nitrile rubber is very resilient and durable and used extensively in industrial and aeronautical applications. Provided the o-ring is in good condition and caseback is snugged down correctly (no need for gorilla torque) I can see no reason at all why WR should be compromised. This is one area where DIY is as good or better than some ham-fisted 'professional'. I'd bet good money it would still pass a WR test - but there's only one way to be sure for those of a nervous disposition...
People underestimate the power of a properly-installed rubber seal. The 230-bar pressure in a scuba tank is held in check by a $1 user-installed rubber O-ring. Nothing your watch will encounter will ever approach this - just ensure that the gasket is in good shape, adequately lubed and installed correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
People underestimate the power of a properly-installed rubber seal. The 230-bar pressure in a scuba tank is held in check by a $1 user-installed rubber O-ring. Nothing your watch will encounter will ever approach this - just ensure that the gasket is in good shape, adequately lubed and installed correctly.
Will do - thanks.
 

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Nothing can replace a simple pressure test to provide peace of mind. All of mine are tested yearly when I go to town.

Since you posted I'll offer some take it or leave it advice. When you open a watch for any reason it pays to have a little container of silicon gasket lube handy. The lube is not necessarily used to make the seal better, it is a lubricant and it helps the case back - case and O ring to slide during the retightening of the back plate. Dry O rings can and will at times buckle which not only will allow the watch to gather moisture but shards of the torn O ring can become lodged in a movement. Always lube a ring after inspecting with loupe to insure it is without issues.

My second bit of advice regards the tightening of both case backs and crowns. When you are tightening connections separated by a rubber or synthetic rubber O ring overtightening is just as harmful to the seal as under tightening. Over tightening will not improve the seal. It will however compress the gaskets to such a point that they will need replaced more frequently.

Crown tighteners are notorious for cranking them down to the point they are about to strip the threads. Snug is good, that's when you stop, don't go for the extra half rotation..............
A properly designed o-ring face seal cannot be over-tightened. The o-ring sits in a groove, which serves as a hard compression stop to prevent over-compression of the o-ring and subsequent damage.
 

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A properly designed o-ring face seal cannot be over-tightened. The o-ring sits in a groove, which serves as a hard compression stop to prevent over-compression of the o-ring and subsequent damage.
Agreed, however all designs don't use this style of seat. I've seen a number where the gasket can be crushed to nothing if you tighten it down far enough, although these are usually on cheaper watches.
 
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