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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sure this has been covered several times before, but always worth a discussion. I believe there are many misconceptions regarding this topic, so let's get things straight. I felt it necessary to start this thread because I watch many YouTube videos, and get frustrated by people who have a total misunderstanding regarding this issue. Like many people I strongly believe that this needs addressing by the industry, possibly introducing symbols rather than depth ratings. Water resistance is achieved by using a combination of seals, gaskets, and normally a screw down back. When the back is removed it's always best to replace and silicone the new seal. That said, a seal in good condition is generally OK to be used again.

30m - Splash proof
50m - OK in the shower and possible a gentle swim
100m - OK for swimming and snorkelling
200m - OK for shallow diving
300m plus - OK for more serious diving

The numbers are purely an industry guideline, and do NOT represent the actual depth someone should take the watch to. These numbers are static water pressure, and the pressure increases considerably with movement. Screw in crowns aren't absolutely necessary, and I have owned and swum with several 200m watches without them. However, they are a good safeguard, and to my knowledge you won't find a 300m+ watch without one.

Some watches have an ISO rating, and this is wear some enthusiasts get confused. An ISO rating is only an official confirmation of what I have written above, and this has been achieved by specific tests. Example, a 200m ISO rated watch can NOT be taken down for a 200m dive. The majority of watches, both expensive and cheap, do not have ISO ratings, so buyer beware. Of course, in this day and age very few divers actually use a watch for diving, they use a rather complex dive computer on their wrist.

Any further comments would be appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm usually not a do a search a-hole, but there may be hundreds of threads on this exact topic, including lengthy explanations of the myth of dynamic pressure and how heat and salt water affects seals.
I am sure there is, but when ever an old thread is dragged up, the OP get's condemned for dragging up an old thread. Ultimately there is only so much than can be discussed about watches
 

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I have an F-91W with a 3 bar rating.
I am entirely comfortable swimming with it, diving with it, etc, and not bothered about dynamic pressure...
Entirely happy with salt, sand and general grit also.
;)
 
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Sure this has been covered several times before, but always worth a discussion. I believe there are many misconceptions regarding this topic, so let's get things straight. I felt it necessary to start this thread because I watch many YouTube videos, and get frustrated by people who have a total misunderstanding regarding this issue. Like many people I strongly believe that this needs addressing by the industry, possibly introducing symbols rather than depth ratings. Water resistance is achieved by using a combination of seals, gaskets, and normally a screw down back. When the back is removed it's always best to replace and silicone the new seal. That said, a seal in good condition is generally OK to be used again.
Yes

30m - Splash proof
50m - OK in the shower and possible a gentle swim
100m - OK for swimming and snorkelling
200m - OK for shallow diving
300m plus - OK for more serious diving

The numbers are purely an industry guideline, and do NOT represent the actual depth someone should take the watch to.
I'm not sure it's accurate to say these are "industry standard", but it is guidance used by numerous manufacturers. Not all manufacturers use the same scale, so always consult your owner's manual.

These numbers are static water pressure, and the pressure increases considerably with movement.
Yes, they are static ratings. Splashdown, or impact with water's surface aside, movement at speeds that a human can achieve when submerged will not generate significant dynamic pressure.

Screw in crowns aren't absolutely necessary, and I have owned and swum with several 200m watches without them. However, they are a good safeguard, and to my knowledge you won't find a 300m+ watch without one.
Yes

Some watches have an ISO rating, and this is wear some enthusiasts get confused. An ISO rating is only an official confirmation of what I have written above, and this has been achieved by specific tests. Example, a 200m ISO rated watch can NOT be taken down for a 200m dive. The majority of watches, both expensive and cheap, do not have ISO ratings, so buyer beware. Of course, in this day and age very few divers actually use a watch for diving, they use a rather complex dive computer on their wrist.
Oh boy...

There are multiple ISO water resistance rating standards. ISO 22810 is the most common. This standard requires that watches be tested on a sample basis. One watch from a production batch is tested to verify that it meets the rating, and the others are assumed to be good based on production quality control. This practice is why the above industry "de-rated" guidelines are used.

The other ISO standard is 6425. 6425 requires that every watch produced be tested to 125% of its rated static pressure. These watches are absolutely capable of being taken to their full rated depth. However, seals do degrade over time, so it is important that you replace them every few years and, if you use your watch for diving, perform periodic pressure tests to verify the seals are still healthy.

There's a third category, and those are manufacturers who test every watch, but not necessarily to ISO 6425. Rolex, Omega, and IWC are examples.
 

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Sure this has been covered several times before, but always worth a discussion. I believe there are many misconceptions regarding this topic, so let's get things straight. I felt it necessary to start this thread because I watch many YouTube videos, and get frustrated by people who have a total misunderstanding regarding this issue. Like many people I strongly believe that this needs addressing by the industry, possibly introducing symbols rather than depth ratings. Water resistance is achieved by using a combination of seals, gaskets, and normally a screw down back. When the back is removed it's always best to replace and silicone the new seal. That said, a seal in good condition is generally OK to be used again.

30m - Splash proof
50m - OK in the shower and possible a gentle swim
100m - OK for swimming and snorkelling
200m - OK for shallow diving
300m plus - OK for more serious diving

The numbers are purely an industry guideline, and do NOT represent the actual depth someone should take the watch to. These numbers are static water pressure, and the pressure increases considerably with movement. Screw in crowns aren't absolutely necessary, and I have owned and swum with several 200m watches without them. However, they are a good safeguard, and to my knowledge you won't find a 300m+ watch without one.

Some watches have an ISO rating, and this is wear some enthusiasts get confused. An ISO rating is only an official confirmation of what I have written above, and this has been achieved by specific tests. Example, a 200m ISO rated watch can NOT be taken down for a 200m dive. The majority of watches, both expensive and cheap, do not have ISO ratings, so buyer beware. Of course, in this day and age very few divers actually use a watch for diving, they use a rather complex dive computer on their wrist.

Any further comments would be appreciated
And yet here you are, spreading the same misinformation:
50m WR CAN be used for swimming and water sports, etc, if the manufacturer says it can. For instance the Bulova moon watch specifically states "For swimming, models that have the additionalmarking of “50m,” “100m” or “200m” are recommended." It's up to the manufacturer to decide, not blogs or opinions. RTFM is always the BEST advice.

Pressure does NOT increase (dynamic) underwater enough/at all to have any effect on water resistance.

ISO rated watch means that watch HAS been tested to the appropriate depth of water resistance and if a watch has been ISO rated to 200m then it CAN go down to 200m (and at least 10% more). ISO rated watches are all individually tested, that is actually part of the ISO rating.
 

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I am sure there is, but when ever an old thread is dragged up, the OP get's condemned for dragging up an old thread. Ultimately there is only so much than can be discussed about watches
I agree. Every thread can't be 100% original. I think it's a fine question.

I don't dive and swim in swimming pools or shallow ocean / lake. Any of these are fine with me.

I care more about the age of a watch. I have heard to many times that the quality of the seals is the most important thing. If I'm ever in doubt, I just take it to one of my local jewelry shops and they pressure test it to 3 ATM. That is more than enough for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And yet here you are, spreading the same misinformation:
50m WR CAN be used for swimming and water sports, etc, if the manufacturer says it can. For instance the Bulova moon watch specifically states "For swimming, models that have the additionalmarking of “50m,” “100m” or “200m” are recommended." It's up to the manufacturer to decide, not blogs or opinions. RTFM is always the BEST advice.

Pressure does NOT increase (dynamic) underwater enough/at all to have any effect on water resistance.

ISO rated watch means that watch HAS been tested to the appropriate depth of water resistance and if a watch has been ISO rated to 200m then it CAN go down to 200m (and at least 10% more). ISO rated watches are all individually tested, that is actually part of the ISO rating.
Yes, most 50m WR can be swum with, I agree. The rest I don't. Movement within water does increase the pressure considerably, especially diving into water, which is inevitable at some stage. Try diving 200m with an SKX and see what happens. Ok, your head will blow up first, but the watch simply wouldn't be able to take it, especially without a helium escape valve. Of course, an ISO rated dive watch will be fine if statically tested to it's depth rating + 25%, but that is nothing like using it at 200m down.

This is why I particularly like this subject, there are so many different opinions.
 

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Yes, most 50m WR can be swum with, I agree. The rest I don't. Movement within water does increase the pressure considerably, especially diving into water, which is inevitable at some stage. Try diving 200m with an SKX and see what happens. Ok, your head will blow up first, but the watch simply wouldn't be able to take it, especially without a helium escape valve. Of course, an ISO rated dive watch will be fine if statically tested to it's depth rating + 25%, but that is nothing like using it at 200m down.

This is why I particularly like this subject, there are so many different opinions.
Not really sure why I should take your word at it over that of say, Seiko, or any other dive watch manufacturer. And if I understand it correctly, helium invades a dive watch in the at-depth living chambers, not out in open water.

Not sure why or how you think 20 bars of pressure is somehow different statically than dynamically. Moreover I have to think that any dive watch manufacturer has actually considered all the necessary criteria in designing and testing their watches.
 

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Seals (O rings) are made of rubber....right? It's how they are installed, and how they are intended to be used. The silicone grease used on the O rings is to help prevent binding of the ring so they can seat into their groove. This goes for the case back ring and the rubber o rings used in the stem tube and the underside of a crown and crown sleeve. The grease does not prevent water ingress, the rubber rings do. Their size (diameter and thickness) is very critical.

Temperature will effect the rings as well as the pressures put upon them. Put these contraption into a wet environment under high pressure and you are asking for failure. The plastic gasket that helps to hold the crystal in place is where you will more than likely see a failure in a pressure test of a watch case where these 3 major parts are attached to the case. The tolerances used in measuring the components are what determine how well the case will be able to be "water proof".

The temperature had everything to do with this event...even the ice that formed on the booster that eventually melted (wet, pressure, cold, failure).
15523249
 

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Movement within water does increase the pressure considerably, especially diving into water, which is inevitable at some stage.
Jumping/diving into water (breaking the surface) is not the same as moving through the water. A "splashdown" can generate turbulence with high pressure spikes. Once in the water, a human being cannot move fast enough to generate even 1 atm of dynamic pressure.

Try diving 200m with an SKX and see what happens. Ok, your head will blow up first, but the watch simply wouldn't be able to take it, especially without a helium escape valve. Of course, an ISO rated dive watch will be fine if statically tested to it's depth rating + 25%, but that is nothing like using it at 200m down.
HE valves are used when divers are working in a diving bell, which is a pressurized gas atmosphere, not a submerged environment. Assuming your body could take it, you could absolutely take an SKX down 200m in the water, and back up again, and the watch would be fine. Indeed, every SKX is subjected to such a test (tested to 250m depth, in fact).
 

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Jumping/diving into water (breaking the surface) is not the same as moving through the water. A "splashdown can generate turbulence with high pressure spikes. Once in the water, a human being cannot move fast enough to generate even 1 atm of dynamic pressure.



HE valves are used when divers are working in a diving bell, which is a pressurized gas atmosphere, not a submerged environment. Assuming your body could take it, you could absolutely take an SKX down 200m in the water, and back up again, and the watch would be fine. Indeed, every SKX is subjected to such a test (tested to 250m depth, in fact).
15523265

Really, don't waste you time and argument. No matter how much physics supports your argument you can't win.
 

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Yes, most 50m WR can be swum with, I agree. The rest I don't. Movement within water does increase the pressure considerably, especially diving into water, which is inevitable at some stage. Try diving 200m with an SKX and see what happens. Ok, your head will blow up first, but the watch simply wouldn't be able to take it, especially without a helium escape valve. Of course, an ISO rated dive watch will be fine if statically tested to it's depth rating + 25%, but that is nothing like using it at 200m down.

This is why I particularly like this subject, there are so many different opinions.

But only one set of facts.

Rehashing old topics is always good, but ignoring a decade+ of posts to start the same thread and spead misinformation isn't helpful. Search, read, post, is a good guideline.
 

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The numbers are purely an industry guideline, and do NOT represent the actual depth someone should take the watch to. These numbers are static water pressure, and the pressure increases considerably with movement.
Does it, does it really :sneaky:

200m is plenty more than enough for "shallow diving". Not sure where you got that classification from. There is no chance of this post being the be-all and end-all of the discussion, and I'm sure we'll have someone else telling us all next week that it's time to finally put it to bed!
 

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I've taken 200m watches down as far as 140' with no problems.

I think 200m is sufficient for way more than "shallow diving."
Anything much over 40m requires specialized gas mixtures and other considerations. You enter the realm of technical and professional diving, not just recreational scuba. A 100m watch, verified to 100m, is more than adequate for recreational scuba. In fact, a lot of dive computers are only rated to 100m.
 
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