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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
srx007p1_1.jpg
I'm looking at these two watches as a potential buy for my 21st birthday in October:
Premier SRX008P1 watches for Men from Seiko | Seiko
Premier SRX007P1 watches for Men from Seiko | Seiko

And I was wondering what people thought of it here. I've been lurking various topics on different watches the last couple of days and you seem like a really good community of people to ask for that. When I started looking I was looking at Rotary watches, I quite like the rose gold styled ones. I've since moved a bit upmarket and I'm looking at Deyfruss, Tissot, Citizen and so forth. I wasn't expecting to find a Seiko I liked, I had a few preconceptions about the sort of things they did, but I must say these two are utterly beautiful in my opinion. What that says about my tastes is another matter.

These two watches are near the upper range of what I might be able to get, it's not my money after all. I quite liked this Tissot too: http://www.my-watchsite.com/classic...her-strap-t912.428.46.058.00-tissot-3868.html though that probably is beyond my means and a bit dressy.

A few questions on the Seikos, do they use a quartz crystal and does it really matter? What sort of burden does it put on me in terms of upkeep? In terms of getting it serviced, lifetime of the leather strap ect. I'm looking for a watch which is good in big do's as well as general nice occasions, which I think the SRX007 does perfectly. The sort of career I'm pursuing means that I will have times to wear a dress watch, but more need for a watch to wear in formal-ish situations in work and life.

I hope I haven't said anything stupid or am taking liberties by asking you to help me select a watch. I think that the Seiko is the one I will end up asking for, as it really grabs me. I love the detailing; the edges of the different dials are sumptuous. My only worry is that the steel version is too shiny and that the rose gold is a bit too showy.
 

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Well, here's some info in Kinetic Direct Drive.
Press Release|BASELWORLD 2007 SEIKO WATCH CORPORATION
What Is Seiko Kinetic Direct Drive? An Evolved Quartz Kinetic Movement; The Answer Is Here | aBlogtoWatch

Essentially, it is a quartz movement. But instead of a battery that you change, it has a rechargeable (lithium ion, I think, but don't hold me to that) battery that is charged by your body's movement or hand winding winding. Maintenance wise, it should be fine for a long time. The current cells they use are much better than the old capacitors, although they will wear over time. I believe the lifespan is around 10 years, at which point it may not hold a charge very well. With daily wear, it should be fine.

Leather straps have varying lifetimes depending on how well made the strap is. I've never owned a Seiko with a stock leather, so I'll leave that to someone more experienced. It'll probably be years, if you dry it when it gets wet and don't allow it to get smelly.

As for the styling, that is entirely up to you. The general consensus on this forum (as it should be) is buy what you like, wear what you like. If you are the kind of person who can pull off rose gold, more power too you. That is a decision you will have to make yourself. As far as the SS being too shiny, it would be best to see it in person. Barring that, you should at least find some pictures online and see if it looks alright.

In the end, it's all preference.
 

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I love it but it sure is damn expensive. Really want a moonphase...
 

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I recently pulled the trigger on a BFK and this will be my first kinetic watch but ultimately, if we get on, a Direct Drive beckons. I see no reason why you shouldn't go for the all steel one full throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Well, here's some info in Kinetic Direct Drive.
Press Release|BASELWORLD 2007 SEIKO WATCH CORPORATION
What Is Seiko Kinetic Direct Drive? An Evolved Quartz Kinetic Movement; The Answer Is Here | aBlogtoWatch

Essentially, it is a quartz movement. But instead of a battery that you change, it has a rechargeable (lithium ion, I think, but don't hold me to that) battery that is charged by your body's movement or hand winding winding. Maintenance wise, it should be fine for a long time. The current cells they use are much better than the old capacitors, although they will wear over time. I believe the lifespan is around 10 years, at which point it may not hold a charge very well. With daily wear, it should be fine.

Leather straps have varying lifetimes depending on how well made the strap is. I've never owned a Seiko with a stock leather, so I'll leave that to someone more experienced. It'll probably be years, if you dry it when it gets wet and don't allow it to get smelly.

As for the styling, that is entirely up to you. The general consensus on this forum (as it should be) is buy what you like, wear what you like. If you are the kind of person who can pull off rose gold, more power too you. That is a decision you will have to make yourself. As far as the SS being too shiny, it would be best to see it in person. Barring that, you should at least find some pictures online and see if it looks alright.

In the end, it's all preference.
Thanks for the explanations. What is the benefit of non-quartz movements, though? The actual watch will last a lot longer than ten years, I hope? You are only on about the battery? I saw on a website explaining what the jewels are for and that a good mid-range watch should use between 15-20 jewels. Should I have any concerns about this one having twelve, or was that a bit of watch snobbery/ operating at a different level?

I'd much rather use a leather strap. My dad's Rotary is a metal bracelet and I always feel it's a bit too in-your-face when you can have the option of a leather strap, even if they do deteriorate in a way that metal bracelets don't. They must also be more comfortable to wear.

Well my personal preference is massively important, but it would also be nice to not have a watch that people crinkle their noses at. If I just wanted to tell the time I'd carry on using my phone, it's a combination of loving it for myself and how it looks to others, particularly if I end up wearing it to job interviews, dates and so on (I certainly don't want to look like a showy prat on the latter). I think that leads me to wanting something relatively, if not too far, conservative. What sort of person can pull off rose gold then? I suspect you either need to have darker skin tones or be quite old to wear it well, and I fit neither bill. I love copper as a colour generally though, and I'm not a fan of normal gold.

I'll probably try to find it in a jewelry shop in the next few days and see it for myself. Pictures and videos I've found online use types of lighting that you wouldn't really get in everyday life. Either too bright or too dim. I believe a guy sold one on here a while back, (link: https://www.watchuseek.com/f29/fs-s...-drive-moon-phase-model-srx007p1-1007262.html) and it's stunning. It's possibly a little bit fat for my liking, but I think that most watches are fatter than I previously thought and also look thicker off the wrist.

And to McNabbanov, it's very expensive. I'm quite lucky to have the offer of a nice watch in truth. It's a bit of an 18th/21st present as I didn't get anything much for that birthday. I'm making sure to do my research properly as I want a watch I can keep for a long time and potentially hand down in the future.
 

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I wouldn't worry about the life span of the watch, it will last plenty. Basically it just needs the rechargeable battery replaced after 10 years or so (probably longer than that) much like any other non-automatic/mechanical watch. The kinetics are great imo, lasts like 6 months when fully charged, don't need to replace the batteries every few years, the direct drive addition is sweet on these so you can essentially 'hand wind' the battery.

looks great on the black leather!

this watch is quartz with kinetic technology recharging the battery, the benefit of a non-quartz (aka autmatic) is that it doesn't need a battery at all ever, but still needs to be serviced every 5-10 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I wouldn't worry about the life span of the watch, it will last plenty. Basically it just needs the rechargeable battery replaced after 10 years or so (probably longer than that) much like any other non-automatic/mechanical watch. The kinetics are great imo, lasts like 6 months when fully charged, don't need to replace the batteries every few years, the direct drive addition is sweet on these so you can essentially 'hand wind' the battery.

looks great on the black leather!

this watch is quartz with kinetic technology recharging the battery, the benefit of a non-quartz (aka autmatic) is that it doesn't need a battery at all ever, but still needs to be serviced every 5-10 years.
That's ideal then. Like I say, it's one I'd like to keep as long as possible. It's good that it lasts so long. You're not meant to allow a watch to unwind fully though, right? What is effectively a fuel gauge will help with that.
 

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if you wear it every day it will never 'unwind'. but you're right, not good for it at all to let the battery fully run out. I wear my kinetic BFK probably once a week and it stays consistently at the 'month' charge marker
 

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That's ideal then. Like I say, it's one I'd like to keep as long as possible. It's good that it lasts so long. You're not meant to allow a watch to unwind fully though, right? What is effectively a fuel gauge will help with that.
Well, when it "unwinds" the battery cell is really just running dry. As with all LiIon batteries, it's best to not let it hit 0. That being said, it sounds like you are a "one watch" kinda guy, and daily wear will keep it topped up. Buy one and see how you like it. You can always sell it back for a small monetary loss, and a large gain in experience.
 

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Thanks for the explanations. What is the benefit of non-quartz movements, though? The actual watch will last a lot longer than ten years, I hope? You are only on about the battery? I saw on a website explaining what the jewels are for and that a good mid-range watch should use between 15-20 jewels. Should I have any concerns about this one having twelve, or was that a bit of watch snobbery/ operating at a different level?
A quartz watch will have fewer jewels in that there are fewer moving parts causing friction. An automatic, having many more moving parts will need more jewels. There are other variables to consider however. Quartz, timed by the vibrations of a crystal, stimulated by the electric current of a battery, and with fewer moving parts than their automatic brethren, are more accurate as a timekeeper. Automatics tend to gain or lose time, depending on temperature, position when off wrist, momentum/movement when on, and so on. With more moving parts they tend to need servicing more often. Their charm however, is the fact that they are tiny, complex, machines that you strap to your wrist, in my opinion.

I can live with the inconsistencies in time. A few seconds here and there, reset them from time to time. I have other alternatives for the "exact" time right on my phone. But it can never replace the warm fuzzies I get from an automatic watch, ticking its little heart away on my wrist. There was a time when accuracy and carefree nature were the goal in my watch hunt, and I still have a hand full of Citizen Eco-Drives to prove it. Something in the symbiotic nature of an automatic has won me over now and it's hard to go back.

This Kinetic Direct Drive seems interesting and worthy of a try. Being somewhere in the middle of automatic and quartz, I would imagine that the service needs would lie in that area as well.

It's a great looking watch. I love the complications on the face and the classic look. The watch in this picture however seems to display the other nature of quartz watches that drives me crazy though, the second hand. From my view, it looks like it is stopped in resting position, just ever so slightly out of line with the 7 index. I can just make it out guaging from the round end of the opposite end, in the "O" of Seiko. It's a small thing I know, but it drives me crazy when the second hand does not line up with the marker. Just don't put any markers at all if you are not at least going to line up the face and the mechanism properly, I say. Don't have that problem with the sweeping second hand of an automatic.

That is probably why I am so obsessed with spring drive. (can't afford it) The precision time keeping abilities of a quartz, the mechanical nature of the mechanism, and of course, the smoothly sliding second hand.

Just be sure to ask the seller to check that the second hand lines up nicely and buy that beauty. It's a Seiko, it's bound to be good.
 

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Thanks for the explanations. What is the benefit of non-quartz movements, though? The actual watch will last a lot longer than ten years, I hope? You are only on about the battery? I saw on a website explaining what the jewels are for and that a good mid-range watch should use between 15-20 jewels. Should I have any concerns about this one having twelve, or was that a bit of watch snobbery/ operating at a different level?
A quartz watch will have fewer jewels in that there are fewer moving parts causing friction. An automatic, having many more moving parts will need more jewels. There are other variables to consider however. Quartz, timed by the vibrations of a crystal, stimulated by the electric current of a battery, and with fewer moving parts than their automatic brethren, are more accurate as a timekeeper. Automatics tend to gain or lose time, depending on temperature, position when off wrist, momentum/movement when on, and so on. With more moving parts they tend to need servicing more often. Their charm however, is the fact that they are tiny, complex, machines that you strap to your wrist, in my opinion.

I can live with the inconsistencies in time. A few seconds here and there, reset them from time to time. I have other alternatives for the "exact" time right on my phone. But it can never replace the warm fuzzies I get from an automatic watch, ticking its little heart away on my wrist. There was a time when accuracy and carefree nature were the goal in my watch hunt, and I still have a hand full of Citizen Eco-Drives to prove it. Something in the symbiotic nature of an automatic has won me over now and it's hard to go back.

This Kinetic Direct Drive seems interesting and worthy of a try. Being somewhere in the middle of automatic and quartz, I would imagine that the service needs would lie in that area as well.

It's a great looking watch. I love the complications on the face and the classic look. The watch in this picture however seems to display the other nature of quartz watches that drives me crazy though, the second hand. From my view, it looks like it is stopped in resting position, just ever so slightly out of line with the 7 index. I can just make it out guaging from the round end of the opposite end, in the "O" of Seiko. It's a small thing I know, but it drives me crazy when the second hand does not line up with the marker. Just don't put any markers at all if you are not at least going to line up the face and the mechanism properly, I say. Don't have that problem with the sweeping second hand of an automatic.

That is probably why I am so obsessed with spring drive. (can't afford it) The precision time keeping abilities of a quartz, the mechanical nature of the mechanism, and of course, the smoothly sliding second hand.

Just be sure to ask the seller to check that the second hand lines up nicely and buy that beauty. It's a Seiko, it's bound to be good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A quartz watch will have fewer jewels in that there are fewer moving parts causing friction. An automatic, having many more moving parts will need more jewels. There are other variables to consider however. Quartz, timed by the vibrations of a crystal, stimulated by the electric current of a battery, and with fewer moving parts than their automatic brethren, are more accurate as a timekeeper. Automatics tend to gain or lose time, depending on temperature, position when off wrist, momentum/movement when on, and so on. With more moving parts they tend to need servicing more often. Their charm however, is the fact that they are tiny, complex, machines that you strap to your wrist, in my opinion.

I can live with the inconsistencies in time. A few seconds here and there, reset them from time to time. I have other alternatives for the "exact" time right on my phone. But it can never replace the warm fuzzies I get from an automatic watch, ticking its little heart away on my wrist. There was a time when accuracy and carefree nature were the goal in my watch hunt, and I still have a hand full of Citizen Eco-Drives to prove it. Something in the symbiotic nature of an automatic has won me over now and it's hard to go back.

This Kinetic Direct Drive seems interesting and worthy of a try. Being somewhere in the middle of automatic and quartz, I would imagine that the service needs would lie in that area as well.

It's a great looking watch. I love the complications on the face and the classic look. The watch in this picture however seems to display the other nature of quartz watches that drives me crazy though, the second hand. From my view, it looks like it is stopped in resting position, just ever so slightly out of line with the 7 index. I can just make it out guaging from the round end of the opposite end, in the "O" of Seiko. It's a small thing I know, but it drives me crazy when the second hand does not line up with the marker. Just don't put any markers at all if you are not at least going to line up the face and the mechanism properly, I say. Don't have that problem with the sweeping second hand of an automatic.

That is probably why I am so obsessed with spring drive. (can't afford it) The precision time keeping abilities of a quartz, the mechanical nature of the mechanism, and of course, the smoothly sliding second hand.

Just be sure to ask the seller to check that the second hand lines up nicely and buy that beauty. It's a Seiko, it's bound to be good.
Ah that makes a lot of sense, it seemed odd that a watch of that quality would have skimped on the jewels. And I know exactly what you mean in regards to the charm of automatics. It's good to know that the quartz will keep time better, but ultimately that's not really the point. Losing a few seconds a day wouldn't bother me.

I've been looking at the Citizen Eco Drives too and they look like beautiful watches for the price. Certainly above other brands at a similar cost.

So once every few years would be key, I take it?

I know what you mean about the out-of-line second hands. It annoys me whenever I see it. I always used to believe it just depended on the angle but the truth is second hands are rarely aligned in cheaper equipment. How would a seller go about ensuring alignment of the second hand though? A smoothly gliding hand would be lovely to have, but ultimately there's something in the tick of a watch also.

I hope to be able to get that watch. It's the one I've fallen in love with. Hopefully I'll be able to get it (I did say it was a bit above the other watches I was looking at), even if it means subsidising part of the cost myself.

And thanks again for replying mcnabbanov. And to Colem I wouldn't say I was necessarily a one-watch sort of guy. Generally speaking I've never worn watches with any great consistency over my life. Mostly because the plastic stuff you get as a kid always felt a bit nasty to me. I could see myself buying another watch or two over the years. If I ever become a wealthy man, a watch in this vein would be a great dress watch (http://www.my-watchsite.com/classic...her-strap-t912.428.46.058.00-tissot-3868.html). And I might get a watch or two which are less formal/showy for more casual occasions. It would be nice to have a small collection.
 
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