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My personal opinion is that they look much better on the smaller watches they were originally designed for....imo, 40mm or less. Again, jmo!
 

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Why do they call it a NATO strap. When I was in the service in the late 80's ity was an acronym for North Atlantic Training Operations....
 

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Actually, NATO stands for North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The strap is called a NATO as many countries had standardized equipment for cross use between forces. The strap was a standard issue item by a number of European forces, especially the British, thus it took on the name NATO.

Check out the Maratac version of the NATO, called the four ring. same strap configuration and application but, IMHO, a much more substantial strap and a bit more comfortable. http://www.broadarrow.net/maratac.htm
 

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Very interesting. I was part of 2 Nato crusies, I earned my bluenose twice and went to Germany twice during those 2 month mini-cruises.....
 

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Very interesting. I was part of 2 Nato crusies, I earned my bluenose twice and went to Germany twice during those 2 month mini-cruises.....
As an example, back in the mid 80's there was quite a stir when DoD was selecting a new general service pistol for service-wide use. NATO pressured the US to go 9mm instead of the traditional .45ACP as NATO was only stockpiling 9mm pistol ammunition for use in a European theatre conflict. Compatability won out over tradition and Beretta USA got the contract for a 9mm service pistol. Of course, the .45ACP is still in use by various special ops units, among other exotic firearms.
 

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A Bond Nato 20mm




A red Bond Nato 18mm


A braided Nato 18mm


And two 2 ring Zulu 20mm


 

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What were originally called "NATO" straps...

...on collector forums are what the British military calls the "G10" (after the inventory requisition form). It's covered under Ministry of Defence Standard 66-47, "Strap, Wrist Watch". You'll find it listed on this page ( http://www.dstan.mod.uk/ ) . Now, I say originally, because people started using the term "NATO" to describe most nylon military-type straps. The British G10 probably got the "NATO" name because that strap has a NATO Stock Number (NSN 6645-99-124-2986), which as Mike explained, is a inventory control number to describe equipment used by NATO forces. The "6645" designates timekeeping and other measurement equipment, and the "99" is for UK forces.

The Zulu and Rhino straps have their origin indirectly from the British G10, which provided the double strap layer with hardware at both ends design. However, the direct ancestor of the Zulu and Rhino straps are the Australian Waterborne strap, which took the G10 design and added the larger ring hardware. While the Waterborne, Zulu, and Rhino straps are used by military personnel in the UK, US, Australia, and probably other countries on a private purchase basis, I don't think that any of them have been formally adopted by the respective militaries, with NATO Stock Numbers assigned.

My $.02,

Mahalo,

andy
 

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To me the NATO and ZULU are more comfortable and are more secure, because in the event that a pin breaks, the other pin will keep the watch on the strap. Of course, I have never had a pin break myself, but I have always had a fear of losing a watch that way.
 

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I prefer the pull-through. If you wear it a lot and use it on a beater watch, be prepared to replace it every now and again. I think of my NATO straps as disposable sometimes. The hole tends to enlarge after awhile, and I just replace rather than trying to fix it (i.e. by burning it or something).
 
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