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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was thinking about the sports that casio could be really targeting with G-shocks, ones that would be profitable for them and would sell plenty of watches and be great for the buyers too.

Having an olive green ranger and woodland camo gd-120-5 it got me thinking that casio could sell plenty of watches to hunters and shooters, its a huge untapped market for watches, they could put a whole bunch of features together and make some really rugged hunting/assult watches that could be called the HUNTSMAN ! :)

Hunting and shooting is a huge industry and im certain the average punter would buy one too.

Hunting/Shooting
Golf
Mountain biking
Fishing - realise they did make a very average fishing model.

But all huge industries.

I'm hoping casio really emphasises the ''tool'' in their watches in the future, and i understand that current G's can be used for any of the below, but i think they have the scope for their own watches even if some of it was down to good advertising, we would still have more watches to buy, more new designs.

Can you guys thing of any profession or sport casio should be making watches for that they arnt?
And is this a direction you would like to see them go?

chers and happy christmas peeps.
 

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Casio as a whole or g-shock only?
I've been eyeing PAS410b for a long while. It's a hunting watch, with hunting timing notification. Based on seasonal change and it's effect on animal behavior it seems. There's also PAS400b for fishing.
Sadly just few days before i decided to pull the trigger on the hunting watch the price doubled. And I'm not aesthetically interested with the fishing ones, even when it's basically same watch with different color theme and band.
Ps: I'm not hunting, it's just i liked the watch 's lookand the reviews were good too..

Tlapatakled
 

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It would be cool to see them take care of us in the electrical field. I have a GD 350 that gets energized sometimes when I work on live stuff, and faces some serious magnetism exposure with all the equipment I'm around. The crystal face gets scratched easily too when reaching into a wall snaking wires. The G's are tough no doubt and handle certain things well, I mean I use hammer drills a lot and every G stands up to vibration torture, but the magnetism and energizing seems to get past the toughness. I was working on a emergency power panel and a UPS battery was kicking back some DC on the neutral. I took the hit and apparently so did the watch cus its about 10-15 seconds fast everyday ever since then and I don't think its coincidence. Casio rates their accuracy to be +/- that amount a month. (save the OSHA comments) So if I were casio I'd come out with the G shock "Lineman"
 

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It would be cool to see them take care of us in the electrical field. I have a GD 350 that gets energized sometimes when I work on live stuff, and faces some serious magnetism exposure with all the equipment I'm around. The crystal face gets scratched easily too when reaching into a wall snaking wires. The G's are tough no doubt and handle certain things well, I mean I use hammer drills a lot and every G stands up to vibration torture, but the magnetism and energizing seems to get past the toughness. I was working on a emergency power panel and a UPS battery was kicking back some DC on the neutral. I took the hit and apparently so did the watch cus its about 10-15 seconds fast everyday ever since then and I don't think its coincidence. Casio rates their accuracy to be +/- that amount a month. (save the OSHA comments) So if I were casio I'd come out with the G shock "Lineman"
In general, you shouldn't really wear a bulky watch if you need to reach your hand into tight spaces and near machinery, it could get you seriously injured. Something like the classic square G (e.g. DW5600) may be more appropriate than a large face GD-350. As for energized by electricity, the last you would care is whether your watch can survived it, but rather how to protect yourself from it. ;-) In general terms, the lesser metal your watch uses the lesser the chance of conductivity. Ideally a fully resin watch would be the best for your job safety, but unfortunately virtually all Casio watches have steel case back. There were a few G's before that came with resin covering to the case back, not sure if they still do that for newer G's.

What you can do to insulate the case back from your skin is to either use a Nato strap (which folds over the case back) or some kind of military watch cover like one below. That will at least prevent electricity from traveling through the watch into your body.

watchcover.jpg
 

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It would be cool to see them take care of us in the electrical field.

So if I were casio I'd come out with the G shock "Lineman"
They already did -- the Gaussman: 50 Gs

No longer in production, occasionally found on eBay, but perhaps Casio should bring it back.

What you can do to insulate the case back from your skin is to either use a Nato strap (which folds over the case back) or some kind of military watch cover like one below. That will at least prevent electricity from traveling through the watch into your body.
All that will do is move the watch a millimeter or two away from the body.

A strong enough electrical current will simply leap the gap or go right through the cloth -- even static electricity in the dry winter air will do that!


Back to the original question, and looking over some awful lists of "most popular recreational activities" I can't help but wonder if some future Casio/G-Shock watches might benefit from easier to push and/or front-mounted buttons like the Timex Ironman. Swimming, running, and any sort of bicycling are just three sports that might benefit from easier-to-find stopwatch buttons.

Garmin already has golf-specific watches with GPS data, so Casio probably missed that boat already.

Casio already has runner's watches with pedometer and accelerometer features -- maybe they need to put those into a G-Shock body?
 

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G-Shock for machinists. Needs a calculator. Maybe with some simple trig functions. I don't know what it should be called though.
I'm pretty sure there's a fundamental problem with combining their CA or DB line calculator watch with the G-shock line: too many buttons and can't guarantee 200M water resistance.
 

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I'm pretty sure there's a fundamental problem with combining their CA or DB line calculator watch with the G-shock line: too many buttons and can't guarantee 200M water resistance.
I know there is, dang it.

But there has got to be a way. I mean, it's the 21st century already. If I can't have a flying car, then at least a calculator G-Shock should be a thing by now. Even if they had to resort to touchscreens... I'd still consider it.
 

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to OP, quite a few people in the tactical/hunting scene are using 9000 series mudmans, basic 6900 and basic 5600... as far as extra features to benefit them, for sport shooters, it would be nice to have a built in "shot timer" that fits right on the wrist rather than wearing those bulky pager looking devices clipped on to your belt


for cyclists, it would be nice to have a fully functional GPS watch like a Garmin Fenix but that is with-in the gshock realm of toughness etc.
 

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I am no longer but used to be an avid hunter, for many years. I think I would have really liked the Rangeman during those outings. I could have made frequent use of the barometer, and a little less frequent use of the compass and altimeter. (I never got lost, but if I did the compass might have been a must-have!) The sunrise/sunset times would have also been very useful for me. I might have also found uses for the memory record feature. Another feature that would have been useful that the Ranger does not have is a moon phase. The bulk of the Rangeman would not have bothered me. But if for some reason it did, I probably would have used a lower profile Pathfinder/Protrek instead -- such as the 1500Y-1.

Alternatively I might have also considered the Gulfmaster, but between it and the Ranger, the Ranger would win -- all digital gives it the added edge for toughness and reliability, and it has the sunrise/sunset feature that the Gulfmaster does not have. (and although the Gulfmaster has the moon age/tide graph and the Ranger does not, I'd use those less often than the sunrise/sunset feature)

This is all pie-in-the-sky dreaming for me, because my avid hunting days were in the 1980s and early 1990s, so I would have had many fewer choices of g-shocks back then, with fewer features! (come to think of it, I think I wore Timexes most of the time!) I think all of us are lucky today to have all of the g-shock choices that we do have! :) In general I think Casio has most of the bases covered for people today. If they get too specialized with a watch, for a particular profession let's say, then that watch won't appeal to the masses and Casio might not sell as many of them as they want or need to. The trick is to make a watch with features and functions that appeals to a broad audience and can be used for a variety of purposes, and I think Casio has done a pretty good job at that...
 

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Since Time4Playnow mentioned sunrise/sunset time, tide graph and moon phase/age, Casio should really put out a watch with all 3 in one. So far I have not seen a Casio watch with all 3 together (correct me if I'm wrong). The closest complete functions watch is the PRW2500: with ABC, moon, wave, solar, atomic(multi-band), stopwatch(24h), timer(only 1h though), duplex LCD and 200M WR. Put a better stopwatch and sunrise/sunset time, you have a complete functions watch that has pretty much all Casio watch functions (aside from analog, calculator and databank but those are optional). I don't see why not. With newer techs like GPS and Bluetooth, I don't see it's so hard to combine sunrise/set time, moon phase/age and tide graph.
 
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Being a space nerd as well as a watch nerd, and knowing that G-shocks are popular with astronauts, I'd like to see a "Spaceman" G-shock. With stuff like mission elapsed time, phase elapsed time, and a permanent 2nd time zone (for GMT/Houston time). Possibly an orbit counter too, though that would require the altitude/orbital speed to be input manually. It would also be nice if it could be qualified for extra-vehicular activity, and had "Vacuum Resist" on the dial/strap. An option for swapping the strap (through standard watch lugs or an adapter) for an extra-long velcro one to fit over a space suit wrist would complete the package.
 

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To LanceUCCS, I guess if Casio want to make a watch for EVA, they can submit it to NASA to see if it will pass their stringent tests. I think you're probably aware of this thread by Sjor with tons nice astronaut pictures wearing G-shocks inside their vehicle, just bringing it up again so everyone can enjoy. http://forums.watchuseek.com/f17/few-more-g-shock-nasa-pics-since-i-still-cant-access-wus-my-office-34994.html

However, I think at this point the only watch approved for EVA is still the Omega Speedmaster (correct me if I'm wrong). Here's some interesting history below. It's widely documented that the first watch worn to space, on the outside of space suit with extended strap, was the Speedmaster. That happened on June 3, 1965, when astronaut Edward Higgins White II performed the very first spacewalk by an American (the Russians beat it by 3 months on March 18, 1965, however no watch was worn on the outside). What's lesser documented, was he actually wore two watches! Not one. Likely both were Speedmaster, as evident by the picture below. Unfortunately, Mr. Ed White was killed during the Apollo 1 testing only few months later. There were sayings that his Speedmaster (one of them which he worn to EVA) actually survived the fire which killed him and two other astronauts.

178429main_image_feature_838_ys_full-a.jpg


Interesting links and reads:
Direct link to picture above: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/178429main_image_feature_838_ys_full-a.jpg
NASA's article about Speedmaster: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/omega.html
Wikipedia biography of Ed White: Edward Higgins White - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An article I found written for 35th anniversary of Ed White's spacewalk. It was 35 years ago today - (4 June 1965 - 4 June 2000)
Another article on Speedmaster, apparently NASA picked them up for only $83 bucks each at this time. Ten things you didn’t know about the Omega Speedmaster | Time Transformed
 
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Software developers. I usually have to track the time I spent on certain tasks and I would love to be able to time it.

I'd imagine starting the day by starting the stopwatch and setting it to "Task 1". After finishing the first task I'll switch to "Task 2" and so on. At the end of the day, I'd stop the stopwatch and check how much time I've been spending on certain tasks.
 

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Software developers. I usually have to track the time I spent on certain tasks and I would love to be able to time it.

I'd imagine starting the day by starting the stopwatch and setting it to "Task 1". After finishing the first task I'll switch to "Task 2" and so on. At the end of the day, I'd stop the stopwatch and check how much time I've been spending on certain tasks.
Like how much time you spent on WUS forum? LOL ;)
 
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Software developers. I usually have to track the time I spent on certain tasks and I would love to be able to time it.

I'd imagine starting the day by starting the stopwatch and setting it to "Task 1". After finishing the first task I'll switch to "Task 2" and so on. At the end of the day, I'd stop the stopwatch and check how much time I've been spending on certain tasks.
That sounds almost (but not quite) like the "Time Recorder" feature on the old MTG-900:

time recorder.jpg


It wouldn't keep cumulative time spent on each task, but it can store 30 times (to the second) when you SWITCHED tasks! :) (Then you'd need to sit there at the end of the day with a calculator figuring out cumulative times, and remembering if Record #14 was when you switched tasks, or when the phone rang, or when you got interrupted by something else...maybe checking a "cheat sheet" that would eliminate the need FOR the Time Recorder feature in the first place...yeah, no wonder that feature never really caught on. ;-) )
 

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To LanceUCCS, I guess if Casio want to make a watch for EVA, they can submit it to NASA to see if it will pass their stringent tests. I think you're probably aware of this thread by Sjor with tons nice astronaut pictures wearing G-shocks inside their vehicle, just bringing it up again so everyone can enjoy. http://forums.watchuseek.com/f17/few-more-g-shock-nasa-pics-since-i-still-cant-access-wus-my-office-34994.html

However, I think at this point the only watch approved for EVA is still the Omega Speedmaster (correct me if I'm wrong). Here's some interesting history below. It's widely documented that the first watch worn to space, on the outside of space suit with extended strap, was the Speedmaster. That happened on June 3, 1965, when astronaut Edward Higgins White II performed the very first spacewalk by an American (the Russians beat it by 3 months on March 18, 1965, however no watch was worn on the outside). What's lesser documented, was he actually wore two watches! Not one. Likely both were Speedmaster, as evident by the picture below. Unfortunately, Mr. Ed White was killed during the Apollo 1 testing only few months later. There were sayings that his Speedmaster (one of them which he worn to EVA) actually survived the fire which killed him and two other astronauts.


Interesting links and reads:
Direct link to picture above: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/178429main_image_feature_838_ys_full-a.jpg
NASA's article about Speedmaster: https://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/omega.html
Wikipedia biography of Ed White: Edward Higgins White - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An article I found written for 35th anniversary of Ed White's spacewalk. It was 35 years ago today - (4 June 1965 - 4 June 2000)
Another article on Speedmaster, apparently NASA picked them up for only $83 bucks each at this time. Ten things you didn’t know about the Omega Speedmaster | Time Transformed
Oh, I spent plenty of time looking at that thread. I was surprised to see JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata wearing a GW-300, which was the first G-Shock I ever purchased. Seeing that inspired me to restore mine back to working order.

Yes, the Speedmasters (with the 321, 861, and 1861 movements) are indeed the only watches EVA-qualified by NASA, even to this day. Ed White wore a Reference 105.003 (prior to the "Professional" models) during Gemini 4. This was actually before the Speedy was officially selected by NASA, back when astronauts wore whatever watch they wanted. The Speedmaster X-33 was also approved for spaceflight (though not EVA), and the new X-33 Skywalker has been approved by the ESA. I'd love to own one, but with my current job, I'm making Casio money, not Omega money, lol.

As for the first spacewalk, by cosmonaut Alexey Leonov, I had head that he did wear a watch, a Russian-made Strela Poljot 3017 chronograph. Though by the time Leonov flew again during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, he too was wearing a Speedmaster.

And thinking on this some more, I'd also like to see a G-Shock designed for a manned Mars mission. The "Marsman" could be similar to the Spaceman, but with a Mudman-style dust guard on the caseback, as well as a Mars time function (Martian days are about 37 minutes longer than on Earth).

Here's hoping that Elon Musk can actually make that happen in the near future.
 

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Oh, I spent plenty of time looking at that thread. I was surprised to see JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata wearing a GW-300, which was the first G-Shock I ever purchased. Seeing that inspired me to restore mine back to working order.
Just checked out the picture of your GW-300 in another thread, very nice! Job well done for restoring it. I had a GW-330A, a sibling to yours. Mine had "3 eyes" on the display (module 2688), unlike yours with no "eyes" (module 2608). I wasn't so lucky in restoring it and it ended up dead (details in another thread http://forums.watchuseek.com/f17/interesting-stories-how-your-g-shock-got-damaged-destroyed-1116242.html ). Yours is more rare and actually listed in the G-shock history site as the first atomic clock radio controlled G (for Japan and North America only). G-SHOCK??? - G-SHOCK?? - G-SHOCK - CASIO

Yes, the Speedmasters (with the 321, 861, and 1861 movements) are indeed the only watches EVA-qualified by NASA, even to this day. Ed White wore a Reference 105.003 (prior to the "Professional" models) during Gemini 4. This was actually before the Speedy was officially selected by NASA, back when astronauts wore whatever watch they wanted. The Speedmaster X-33 was also approved for spaceflight (though not EVA), and the new X-33 Skywalker has been approved by the ESA. I'd love to own one, but with my current job, I'm making Casio money, not Omega money, lol.
According to this Omega webpage, OMEGA Watches: Press Kit Text , and the NASA Speedmaster page I linked above, NASA evaluated some watches in the early 60's (likely 1962) purchased locally, then order more in late 1964 from the manufacturers for further testing. So there were watch testings done before the 1965 Gemini 4 EVA. Whether those considered "official" selection, I don't know, but for sure the astronauts were already wearing Speedmasters before it became a publicly known fact. I posted in the Omega forum here, http://forums.watchuseek.com/f20/speedmaster-history-corrigans-nasa-evaluations-certain-peice-paper-503304.html , since it's more appropriate discussion there and was able to confirm some more details. Check it out.

As for the money part, same here I'm also a Casio / Timex affordables guy. Unless they still sell the Speedmaster for 1960's price at $82.50, then I would get one. LOL :-d

As for the first spacewalk, by cosmonaut Alexey Leonov, I had head that he did wear a watch, a Russian-made Strela Poljot 3017 chronograph. Though by the time Leonov flew again during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, he too was wearing a Speedmaster.
So far most sources indicate there was no watch on the outside of his space suit. If he wore it, it was on the inside. Making Ed White's 2 Speedmasters worn during Gemini 4 EVA, the first watches directly exposed to the outer space, both outside the vehicle and the space suit.

And thinking on this some more, I'd also like to see a G-Shock designed for a manned Mars mission. The "Marsman" could be similar to the Spaceman, but with a Mudman-style dust guard on the caseback, as well as a Mars time function (Martian days are about 37 minutes longer than on Earth).

Here's hoping that Elon Musk can actually make that happen in the near future.
Mars time? Ha ;-), now that's something brand new! If Casio would pass the test for that, it would make them the first. Anything that can display dual time or more at the same time, would definitely need a digital watch. That would save the trouble for astronauts for wearing multiple mechanical analog watches. But would a digital watch survive the extremes of space travel, or at least the tests listed in the Omega website above? It's yet to be seen.
 
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