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This is somewhat of a rant. I've been reading posts on this site as well as the other site, and keep seeing how members write about a 7750 like it was a cheap unreliable car made in a third world country, and how it was better to have these new in-house movements. So I have to ask...

Why do people think that a 7750 is inferior to other similar movements that are developed "in-house"? Wasn't a 7750 an "in-house" movement at one point? Has it not been in production for a long enough time to have proven itself as a reliable workhorse? Has an in-house movement ever gone head-to-head testing with a 7750 and come out much more superior in every way? So what if the 7750 doesn't cost as much as one of the in-house movements? I would rather have a reliable movement in my watch than a relatively new and fancy in-house movement decorated with a bunch of fancy baubles.

Okay..rant's over. Sorry.
 

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Nothing wrong at all with the ETA/Valjoux 7750. The 7750 is one of the most used chrono movements ever. Rough, reliable and accurate - a work horse. However I do prefer more sophisticated movements (Zenith, Lemania, GO). Have a closer look on how they are designed compared to an ETA/Valjoux 7750 and you will know why......
 

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The ETA/Valjoux movements are like a MB Diesel. Very reliable, easy to service by a trained watchmaker, but not very exciting.
Inhouse movements are of course much more exciting, usually beautifully done and finished.
As yet, I do not own any Inhouse chrono movements, just the "Diesel" variety.
I am not sure what my 1986 Breitling and Baume&Mercier (1950ies) contain.
 

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foe amount of time the chronograph function gets used , ETA 7750 does its job well as other in house chronograph movements.

Other chronograph movement that gets bad rap is DD modules used on ETA 28XX movements. LOL
 

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This is somewhat of a rant. I've been reading posts on this site as well as the other site, and keep seeing how members write about a 7750 like it was a cheap unreliable car made in a third world country, and how it was better to have these new in-house movements. So I have to ask...

Why do people think that a 7750 is inferior to other similar movements that are developed "in-house"? Wasn't a 7750 an "in-house" movement at one point? Has it not been in production for a long enough time to have proven itself as a reliable workhorse? Has an in-house movement ever gone head-to-head testing with a 7750 and come out much more superior in every way? So what if the 7750 doesn't cost as much as one of the in-house movements? I would rather have a reliable movement in my watch than a relatively new and fancy in-house movement decorated with a bunch of fancy baubles.

Okay..rant's over. Sorry.
Hello Ba,
The "Chronometer" grade variant is the best chronograph movement in the world with regards to long term reliability, accuracy, and stability of the average daily rate.

The others that have been mentioned here may be more sophisticated (i.e very expensive), but they won't out perform the 7750.

One of my other favorites is the Ebel 139 chrongraph movement; I've got 4 Ebel chornographs with it. They are accurate as all get out, but they don't have the stability of the 7750.

heb
 

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....
The "Chronometer" grade variant is the best chronograph movement in the world with regards to long term reliability, accuracy, and stability of the average daily rate.
With all respect but this I doubt.....
 

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I agree with Mike here, not even close ... that crown still belongs to the El Primero. And, it has proven its durability to the naysayers (people who said that a high beat chrono movement wouldn't be durable) for over 40 years. And, it was built at a time when even 4 Hz movements weren't common.

To add to that, Seiko's 6139 (and its successors) is a nicer movement than the 7750 available for less. Ubiquitous doesn't necessarily make something the best.

I'm not knocking the 7750, it's a decent movement that does the job nicely.
 

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El Primero is a great movement but has a somewhat higher reputation for fragility than other chronograph movements like a good 7750. Don't get me wrong, I love them but I don't think I'd classify it as best in the world.

I don't think you can ever crown one chrono movement as best in the world anyway without any sort of real data.

Nothing wrong with a standard 7750 as in there's nothing (hopefully) wrong with a Honda Civic. They're great value time tested designs but a bit boring and has some characteristics some people don't find pleasing like the wobble or the register layout or the easily damaged date complications. Personally I think the Omega/Lemania 1040 or the Lemania 5100 are better movements than the 7750 but some of my favorite watches are 7750 based like the Portuguese Chronograph and the Bremont ALT-1C.

Some people like Civics, some people like Bimmers, some people like Audis, etc. Takes all kinds.
 

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Maybe the best one for the money, but not THE best one.
heb! Check out the offerings from Glashuette!
 

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I beat the Hades out of this one and it keeps on tickin'...

 

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That's true, I probably went a bit overboard in my praise of the El Primeo, but as far as I know, there are no reports of "frail" construction elements that may potentially lead to failure in that movement. Infact, I have heard many owners praise its durability after owning it 10, 20 years or more.

There's this little bit Walt Odets had to say about the 7750 -
"Typically the operation of a coluisse-lever design with heart piece limiter will not be as smooth as that of a column wheel, and pusher forces between various functions will vary. Coordination of functions with a modern design like that of the 7750 will typically be good, though imprecision of hand start, stop, and reset may be greater than that of good column wheel designs."

A column wheel chrono like the FP 1185/1186, GO cal. 60/61, Seiko's 6139 (and various succesors), Cartier's 045, Rolex' 4130, Breitling B01 and a few Breguet calibers have an inherent advantage given that slight flaw. I know that with the exception of a few Seiko calibers, all the others are in a totally different price category than the 7750. Then, you also have the Sea-gull caliber based on the Venus 175 chrono which is a column wheel handwind chrono at a very affordable cost.

Again, I'd like to say that I own a couple of 7750s, and I like them a lot (and have served me very well), but to say that even the "chronometer" grade of the movement is the finest chronograph available is a bit of a stretch to say the least.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It just seems that I've been reading a lot of posts that goes something like this:

"nice watch but it has the 7750 or a 28XX in it...ugh..wouldn't spend that kind of money with a 7750 in it"...

Personally, I would want to buy a watch with a movement that has withstood the test of time than one with a relatively new movement that hasn't gone through rigorous "real world (read:not COSC or other types of special tests developed by the manufacturer of the movement) testing by watch owners. Anyways, it's just me and I was wondering if others felt the same way.

I've dropped my Hamilton 7750 chrono twice now and still not broken (knock on wood).
 

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Part of the appeal of high end watch ownership is exclusivity and uniqueness. To some people, they're not going to pay $5000 for a watch that has a movement of the same design as one can find in a $500 watch.

Personally, I care more about design but I can see the point. Also, it gets really tiresome to own so many 7750 watches. A bit boring and dull.
 

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What's wrong with a 7750 movement? Nothing.

I've got a top grade 7750 in my UTS 600M and an in-house developed/ manufactured c.751D "autotractor" in my JLC MCDC (vertical coupling clutch, column wheel design, free-sprung balance, ceramic ball bearings, double barrel, etc...).

So, is the MCDC better than the 600M? Well, let's see: They both use 12hr/30min subdials with a central second hand to measure elapsed time, and in a 24hr timing test, they deviated from one another by only 1.5 seconds. The only difference that I can see/feel is that the pushers on my MCDC operate with a sinfully delectable "snick".

That's it.

Otherwise, the 600M is far easier to read at a glance, and will be a helluva lot cheaper to service when the time comes. As for the MCDC... Well, I mean just look at it... How could I say no that gorgeous piece of titanium, rubber, and steel?




Bottom line: There ain't nuthin' wrong with a good V7750 ticking away under the hood, but damn if true in-house don't feel good. (Hey, that rhymes...)

Regards,
Adam
 

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I myself, much prefer this:





The Seiko 8R28 automatic chronograph movt... 34 jewels, column wheel, vertical clutch, 3 pointed hammer for instant hands reset, 28800 BPH, -15/+25 secs a day, 12 hour chronograph, 50 hour power reserve, hack, hand wind. 100% made in house right down to the lubricating oils.
 

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25/15 isn't very impressive although I'm sure it can be regulated by a watchmaker to be better.
The 8Rxx is also the first 3-6-9 column wheel chrono to come out of Japan since the late sixties/seventies.

Both 6S and 8R are vastly superior to the 7750, due primarily to the column wheel design, all metal parts and bi-directional winding. Operation of the chrono functions side-by-side will confirm that.

The chronos aren't certified, so their accuracy is spec-ed to +25/-15 s/d. That's documented spec, not on wrist performance. Most non-COSC Swiss watches aren't even spec-ed. It seems Swiss=accurate enough. I found it frustrating to ferret out technical information from the Swiss brands, mostly.

A skilled watchmaker can certainly adjust the watch to better COSC due to the excellent isochronism of the movement.
 

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Both 6S and 8R are vastly superior to the 7750, due primarily to the column wheel design, all metal parts and bi-directional winding. Operation of the chrono functions side-by-side will confirm that.
This is about the closest anything inthis thread has come to justifying why one movement is superior to another (in this case the 7750). The other arguments have been intangible of the "it feels better, it looks nicer, it has more heritage" arguments which cant be proved or disproved.

And as for those arguing that other inhouse movements offer 1 or 2 seconds of additional accuracy - mate, if you are relying on a watch for timing that crucial, I think you are doing something wrong. I am interested to see if COSC 7750s would break that argument anyway.

It just seems like people mount up against 7750 because the are more ubiquitous. 'Design flaws' listed run counter to the reputation of these movements for reliability and of acceptable accuracy.

Some people seem to prefer to spend more on something that they can they tell the rest of us is better, purely on account of it being more expensive :-s
 
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