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I've got a 2231.80 Seamaster Professional (blue dial, sword hands, titanium case and bond bracelet) that dates to 1999. I don't consider it vintage and I doubt anyone would, but when do watches cross over that line?

It needs a service and I'm debating sending it to Omega or going with an independent. I'd prefer to keep original parts as I will keep this watch for the forseeable future and maybe at some point it would be considered more of a vintage model.

Curious for thoughts...
 

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there was a thread something like this question, as I recall a couple years ago
seems the answers varied between experts and the age of said experts seemed to play in
lol
 

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I once read that 25 years or more would be considered vintage, but I myself am still of the mindset that a watch would have to date back to 1970 or earlier for me to consider it a vintage watch.
I also have a Bond Seamaster that I bought new in November 1999 and I still consider it a modern piece.
But that’s just me.
 

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There seems to be no consensus on what is vintage in watches. I think I can get an antique tag for my truck at 20 or 25 years, but 1995 seems like yesterday. I can see where age may affect perspective.

I recently heard a watchmaker on a podcast say he prefers Swiss watches from the 90's and earlier, because parts and materials were not being outsourced compared to the 2000's. A Swiss watch from the 90's was truly Swiss. I know that in certain manufacturing, Air Conditioning for example, thicker metals, better grades of materials and less plastic was used in the older units and they lasted longer, so the watch thing made sense to me. Now I sound like my Grandpa, "They don't make it like they used to!!"
 

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25 yrs old IMHO.. that makes the original Bond 2531.80 vintage wow what a thought.

Not very prudent to put a date to what's vintage, or a specific feature such as "1970s" or "tritium dial". Think about it, in 2120 a hundred years from now, even 120 year old watches are still considered "modern" using the "1970s" or "tritium dial" rule
 

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25 yrs old IMHO.. that makes the original Bond 2531.80 vintage wow what a thought.

Not very prudent to put a date to what's vintage, or a specific feature such as "1970s" or "tritium dial". Think about it, in 2120 a hundred years from now, even 120 year old watches are still considered "modern" using the "1970s" or "tritium dial" rule
We may need to come up with categories of vintage...define certain era's perhaps?

I feel the same way about music. it doesn't feel right to call 80's and 90's era music "classic" but it's certainly not modern either.
 

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I once read that 25 years or more would be considered vintage, but I myself am still of the mindset that a watch would have to date back to 1970 or earlier for me to consider it a vintage watch.
I also have a Bond Seamaster that I bought new in November 1999 and I still consider it a modern piece.
But that’s just me.
I would agree. With watches (and cars), for me they would need to be at least the 70s to count as vintage. 80-90s just dont make it...
 

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Wait until you have kids, for them the 90's were the "olden times", and it makes sense. 90's music for them is like Elvis and Beatles for me
 

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I have a 27 year old Subby date but I wouldn’t say it’s vintage just because it’s 25+ years old, it’s still a current model line after all, just with better proportions than the current fat boys.

So a good question OP, and I don’t really know the official answer.
 

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It's vintage whenever a seller thinks they can get more for it by describing it that way.

Much like the usage of "Rare", and terms like BNIB, NOS etc, it's much abused and misappropriated to suit the purposes of the describer.

Even previously clearly defined terms get redefined by different common usage.

As such, it's effectively a meaningless term, so if you feel like calling it a vintage watch, go for it...

SoOoO many watches, SoOoO little time...
 

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It's vintage whenever a seller thinks they can get more for it by describing it that way.

Much like the usage of "Rare", and terms like BNIB, NOS etc, it's much abused and misappropriated to suit the purposes of the describer.

Even previously clearly defined terms get redefined by different common usage.

As such, it's effectively a meaningless term, so if you feel like calling it a vintage watch, go for it...

SoOoO many watches, SoOoO little time...
I have seen that "whenever a seller" too many times
and sometimes rare means no one bought one so they stopped making them
 

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There's no hard and fast rule. Vintage literally means wine of age and refers to anything that is deemed to be good and typical of its time. So basically, in order to be vintage, you have to have a broad consensus or general agreement between those who know what they're talking about. I think it's certainly possible to have something that's 25 years old and considered vintage. But equally something else of the same age but of inferior quality might just be a bit old.
 

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Once a watch reaches a certain age it can be classed as "vintage". The only fly in the ointment is that there is no officially accepted age for vintage watches as there is for antique, (100 years or older). The most commonly used ages for vintage watches are 20, 25, & 30 years old. Take your pick. Note that the type of watch has no bearing on the issue. It's a matter of age only. Golden age? Pre-quartz? Cheap watches? Expensive watches? Doesn't matter - that's all personal opinion and agreement could never be reached, and who would make such determinations anyway? You? Me? The bloke down the street? All of that stuff just illustrates personal preferences and experience and it is pointless to even pursue such unworkable classifications outside of a personal context.

If a watch is over 100 years old it's an antique. People don't argue that. It doesn't matter if it is a Patek or a dollar watch. Same with vintage watch classification - just choose an age.
 

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Vintage literally means wine of age
I had to look that up - can't believe I'd never thought about it.

Vintage seems to mean a range of things, cars used to have Veteran/Vintage/Classic cut-off dates (at least in England) but as time moves on then surely it is a sliding scale. 'Vintage country music' would be more recent than 'vintage jazz' but still fall into the old category.

I'd call late 70's and older vintage for watches, but that's likely because I was born in the late 70's. It seems to cover early-of-a-type (vintage electric/quartz/etc) and general age (a 1910 pocket watch is clearly at least vintage). Likely also that something sought after would become 'vintage' more quickly - I don't see many old Datsuns for sale as classics, for example, but I'd bet an XJS or Ford Capri would count now.

Reckon the wine parallel is a good one, aside from the word origin. Bit of a judgement call involved.
 
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