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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which resources do you guys Recommed on watch making just getting a better understanding of movements. Is there a defining book like the watch movement bible?


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Stuhrling Original Tuskegee Skymaster
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Sorry just found the sticky link right above my post. Thank you anyways


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Are you ready to apply for watchmaking school or just piddle about and have fun?

Go watch Wristwatch revivals videos. On youtube

then after you are ready for more technical stuff write here again. I will direct you to the best stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you ready to apply for watchmaking school or just piddle about and have fun?

Go watch Wristwatch revivals videos. On youtube

then after you are ready for more technical stuff write here again. I will direct you to the best stuff.
Thank you no school for me I am done with formal schooling. Thank you


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If it helps, here is how I recently go into "watchmaking". My initial goal was to mod a Seiko (dial, hands, and bezel). Lume Shot on YouTube has many good detailed videos on this. However, I was too nervous to start out on one of my own cherished Seiko's, so I bought a very cheap (both price and quality) mechanical watch from Ali Express for $25. Once I practiced taking apart and putting that watch together a few times, I got enough confidence to mod my Seiko. After modding a few watches, I bought a timegrapher and started regulating every watch within reach. That's where I'm at now. I say go as shallow or deep as you want. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If it helps, here is how I recently go into "watchmaking". My initial goal was to mod a Seiko (dial, hands, and bezel). Lume Shot on YouTube has many good detailed videos on this. However, I was too nervous to start out on one of my own cherished Seiko's, so I bought a very cheap (both price and quality) mechanical watch from Ali Express for $25. Once I practiced taking apart and putting that watch together a few times, I got enough confidence to mod my Seiko. After modding a few watches, I bought a timegrapher and started regulating every watch within reach. That's where I'm at now. I say go as shallow or deep as you want. Good luck!
I’ll order something from Aliexpress tonight


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I’ll order something from Aliexpress tonight


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If you haven't done so already, I would spend a little more on AliExpress to get a better watch. That $25 watch I bought was pure junk, and I just threw it away. If you spend like $50-$60 you can get something that you actually might have some fun with and wear every once in a while.
 

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As was mentioned... everyone that wants to try their hand at "fixing" watches must find a point where they are comfortable. Even simple modifications to less expensive watches requires a bit of dexterity and at least some decent tools. Don't think that because a watch is bought cheap it will be a good candidate to start learning on. In fact some of these cheaper watches will prove to be more solidly built than meets the eye. They will put you to the test because of the less refined manufacturing techniques used in their making. (don't assume you can just use a butter knife and some old screwdrivers laying around the house). I've found this out myself by doing simple battery changes on other peoples watches, and some of the junk I thought were worth a try!

If one day you decided that you'd like to step up and move into the guts of a movement, be ready to find out where every screw, plate, pinion wheel, spring belongs, and what it's function is. Spend a good amount of time examining the movement outside of the case, and with the dial and hands removed. With the winding stem in place, test it, pull it out, push it in and study what parts are moved with this action. Turn it over and view how the wheels interact with each other and where there are placed in the train. Pay particular attention to the balance wheel, pallet fork and escape wheel to see them in action in real time. Get right in their with your new 10x magnifier to visualize why they are made the way they're made. It's fascinating to see this very old technology.

I suggest taking many pictures of the process of stripping down each part so you won't have to rely on memory when it comes time to reassemble it all.

It shouldn't have to be mentioned but there will be plenty of things you'll need to really learn and accomplish your goal. Good quality tools, cleaning fluids and vessels, and a very clean well lit area to work in.
 
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