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As was mentioned... everyone that wants to try their hand at "fixing" watches must find a point where they are comfortable. Even simple modifications to less expensive watches requires a bit of dexterity and at least some decent tools. Don't think that because a watch is bought cheap it will be a good candidate to start learning on. In fact some of these cheaper watches will prove to be more solidly built than meets the eye. They will put you to the test because of the less refined manufacturing techniques used in their making. (don't assume you can just use a butter knife and some old screwdrivers laying around the house). I've found this out myself by doing simple battery changes on other peoples watches, and some of the junk I thought were worth a try!

If one day you decided that you'd like to step up and move into the guts of a movement, be ready to find out where every screw, plate, pinion wheel, spring belongs, and what it's function is. Spend a good amount of time examining the movement outside of the case, and with the dial and hands removed. With the winding stem in place, test it, pull it out, push it in and study what parts are moved with this action. Turn it over and view how the wheels interact with each other and where there are placed in the train. Pay particular attention to the balance wheel, pallet fork and escape wheel to see them in action in real time. Get right in their with your new 10x magnifier to visualize why they are made the way they're made. It's fascinating to see this very old technology.

I suggest taking many pictures of the process of stripping down each part so you won't have to rely on memory when it comes time to reassemble it all.

It shouldn't have to be mentioned but there will be plenty of things you'll need to really learn and accomplish your goal. Good quality tools, cleaning fluids and vessels, and a very clean well lit area to work in.
 
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