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Discussion Starter #1
As title states.

Was thinking Valjoux 72 but didnt that came out later? Or Venus 172?
 

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1. Please define 'no-name'.
2. Please define 'best'.
3. There was no 'Venus 172', to my best knowledge.

Regards
Tomcat
 

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Hi Tomcat,


A justifiable question, but I'm afraid it can't be answered.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
Which is precisely why I asked. If the OP shares his interpretation of 'best' with us, maybe we can help ;-)

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1. Please define 'no-name'.
2. Please define 'best'.
3. There was no 'Venus 172', to my best knowledge.

Regards
Tomcat
1. f.e. Chronographe Suisse, Universal Geneve etc.
2. Highest accuracy and reliabilty seems a good denoter. Column Wheel mouvement probably.
3. Meant the Venus 178. But this was late 50s correct?

My questions is, are there hidden gems with nice column wheel movements, in the mess off Landeron 48 based chronographs from the 40s and 50s. In steel?
 

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1. f.e. Chronographe Suisse, Universal Geneve etc.
2. Highest accuracy and reliabilty seems a good denoter. Column Wheel mouvement probably.
3. Meant the Venus 178. But this was late 50s correct?

My questions is, are there hidden gems with nice column wheel movements, in the mess off Landeron 48 based chronographs from the 40s and 50s. In steel?
1. Under the Chronographe Suisse label you can find chronographs with the Venus 170 column-wheel movement too. And you better don't tell anyone that you deem 'Universal Geneve' as no-name, at your risk of being laughed at ;-)

2. You're talking movements from a time when both accuracy and reliability were of paramount importance to watch buyers. So even "one from the mess of Landeron 48s" is perfectly capable of going very precise. It was made to do so.

And column wheels are vastly overrated. They serve no other purpose than overcomplicating the production process of a chronograph movement, requiring an experienced watchmaker to be adjusted. A cam-operated movement works with prefabricated parts which fall into the right place and do the right things without this additional adjustment effort. This is why they were invented in the first place.

Keep in mind, too, that the fabled 'moon watch' is cam-operated, too.

3. Have a look here:

Valjoux 72

Venus 178

According to these sources both were around in the 1940s.

If you're searching for hidden column-wheel gems you'll end with ... of all brands ... Landeron again. In particular the Landeron 39 is as nice, precise, reliable as any other chronograph movement, but available at a fraction of their cost. Steel cases, by the way, were not very common in the 1940s, it took a lot of effort to make them and they were thus found only in high-end watches.


Best
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well yeah I know but was talking about the small names. Not Zenith,Omega etc..
Any particular steel cased gems that can be had for a decent price?

So Landeron 39,VJ 72 and Venus 172 seems to be the top three? 'Depending on complications like triple date and phase de lune ofcourse´
 

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I got no idea what a "no name is"? Anonymous maker?
 

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1. Under the Chronographe Suisse label you can find chronographs with the Venus 170 column-wheel movement too. And you better don't tell anyone that you deem 'Universal Geneve' as no-name, at your risk of being laughed at ;-)
Not by me. Universal made movements that were sold to Jaeger-LeCoultre and others. These usually had the "Jaeger" name only. Cases were inscribed "LeCoultre - Swiss Made", but some also were engraved "Enversteel" which was Universal's trademarked steel alloy. You can find some examples here:

Small Chronograph #2: Jaeger-branded UG Ref 5184 | Omega Forums

This makes Universal no different than Landeron, Venus or Valjoux when it comes to chronograph movements. It's just that the Universal also made these same watches under their own name, while the other companies didn't.

Hope this helps,
gatorcpa
 

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It's just that the Universal also made these same watches under their own name, while the other companies didn't.
And this makes them not-so-no-name ;-)

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Tomcat
 

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@ OP: if you're after tricompax chronographs, the Landeron edition is the (exceedingly rare) 42.

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Tomcat
 

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Congratulations - these are rare as hens' teeth. While a Valoux 72 or a Venus 178 can be had at every corner (provided you have deep enough pockets) the L/42 needs luck to be found. I thoroughly envy you :-!

@ OP: all said, if you wish to have 'The typical 40s'/50s' chronograph, look at 'sdasurrey's' collection: the L/48 family of cam-operated chronographs is the epitome for that era when affordable chronographs became icons of the mass market.

Best
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Congratulations - these are rare as hens' teeth. While a Valoux 72 or a Venus 178 can be had at every corner (provided you have deep enough pockets) the L/42 needs luck to be found. I thoroughly envy you :-!

@ OP: all said, if you wish to have 'The typical 40s'/50s' chronograph, look at 'sdasurrey's' collection: the L/48 family of cam-operated chronographs is the epitome for that era when affordable chronographs became icons of the mass market.

Best
Tomcat
I am just very put off with the gold casing. I´ll look in to it thanks
 
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