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Vintage Seamaster 120, with the Cal. 565 running +1 per day with a positional variation over 6 positions of just 5 seconds...exceeds any modern watch spec out there.



Produced in March 1968, and initially sold to Germany according the the extract of the archives from Omega. Great little watch and these are hard to find in really good condition. Lots of fakes out there as well, so buyers beware.

Cheers, Al
 

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How are these from your perspective on the bench? The one caveat I've seen from owners is that they magnetize easier than they'd like.
Very good. I see plenty of magnetized watches, so I don't think these are any more vulnerable than other watches in general. Here's one from a while back - you can see the hands are magnetized:



But this can happen even on a quartz watch, like this Cartier - the seconds hand was touching the minute hand because of the magnetism, stopping the watch:



It actually came back a second time for this, and they asked me to remove the seconds hand so it wouldn't happen again.

The only reason why they might be more prone is due to the thin cases and proximity of the balance spring to the outside of the case. Magnetic field strength varies based on the distance to the object and follows the inverse cube law. But even the one above that had the magnetized hands was only running +30 per day on average, so not like it was minutes fast per hour, so the balance spring coils weren't sticking together or anything.

In pretty much all of them that I have serviced to date, the total positional variation at full wind over 6 positions has been well under 10 seconds, so this is well within the requirements for COSC, METAS, "Rolex super duper whatever" standards, etc. This is the one with the magnetized hands after service:



Cheers, Al
 
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