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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Is that true?

Here's a thread from 7 years ago, someone trued ask this, and got a bunch of non sequiturs. (As usual :roll:)
https://www.watchuseek.com/f74/divers-white-dial-why-so-rare-828331.html

Is WHITE less common than BLACK or ORANGE due to some science behind the decision?
Or is it an aesthetic choice on the part of the designers / manufacturers, since most dive watch fans don't actually dive??
 

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I’m not sure, I’d have to google it. I know red is the first colour to go followed by orange but that’s only because I fish and red line goes invisible but it’s still quite deep when that happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I’m not sure, I’d have to google it. I know red is the first colour to go followed by orange but that’s only because I fish and red line goes invisible but it’s still quite deep when that happens.
Right, I am aware there is some science to justify.
But then, I find it hard to believe that a black dial would be more visible than an all white (esp if entirely lumed, like a pilot watch), if visibility is what it's all about.
 
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I think it's less science and more certification standards. I'm certainly not an expert on the subject, but the place to start looking is ISO 6425. I don't dive, so I don't really care enough to research the subject much, but I suspect there are some legibility standards in that certification. The watches I've seen which are certified typically have a high contrast between the dial, indices, and hands. So I suspect this is an effort to comply with those certification standards.
 

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Probably, and this is just a guess. A black dial with brilliant white hands, especially lumed would be the easiest to see but you could say the same with a white dial with black hands unless the lime sort of camouflages with a white dial.
 

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My simpleton mind says...

Why would the contrast of white indices on a black dial be less than black outlined hands/indices on a white dial?

Either way it’s white and black contrasting. Which seems to me like would have the strongest contrast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
White is the best color under water. Best coombination for maximum contrast and visibility is black and white.
So then why fewer white dial divers than black?
Do people just prefer black dials over white?
 

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I’m going to guess that since lume is typically a light or white daylight color, and the hands and indexes have to stand out at all depths against the dial watch manufacturers choose darker dial colors to facilitate that.


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This seems like the answer. The shortest route to a usable watch at depth is a dark dial with large lumed indices and hands. Historically these are the form early dive watches took.
Totally possible to do other fun and creative things. I personally LOVE white dialed divers. But not the more traditional choice.


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Thing is how to integrate the toxic green or pink into a dial? Maybe we need toxic green & pink lumes developed for the hour & minute hands, or dial markers and bezel markers. Or just leave the white lume, and paint the hands pink & toxic green.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So is it true or not? -- that there are fewer WHITE dial diver watches on the market.
 
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