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Forgive my ignorance but I don’t know why a watch needs to be filled with liquid. Is there a good reason? And does the liquid cover the dial and movement, or just one or the other? Can’t seem to find the answer online, hence asking here.
 

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Because the liquid cannot be compressed, so it gives the watch much greater water resistance and gives the dial better readability under water. The oil fills the entire case.

However, the liquid would cause problems for automatic movements, so AFAIK that is only done with quartz models.

See the Sinn UX Hydro. Oil-filled, 5,000m WR.
 

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Because the liquid cannot be compressed, so it gives the watch much greater water resistance and gives the dial better readability under water. The oil fills the entire case.

However, the liquid would cause problems for automatic movements, so AFAIK that is only done with quartz models.

See the Sinn UX Hydro. Oil-filled, 5,000m WR.
Dont forget Ressence. They just did it for the magnification and edge to edge dial effect.

And its automatic. Cost an arm and a leg for it though.
 

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The oil filled interior prevents the possibility of total internal reflection, which might cause the watch dial to be unreadable underwater.
 
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It’s a gimmic. They do it to be different. No legitimate reason for it. There are already regular dive watches capable of depths beyond human ability. No need for this at all other than the novelty.
 

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It’s a gimmic. They do it to be different. No legitimate reason for it. There are already regular dive watches capable of depths beyond human ability. No need for this at all other than the novelty.
And readability. Which isn’t really a gimmick.
 

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Everything that goes beyond reading the time is a gimmick with watches. So if you're going to say have a good oil filled watch is a gimmick, then having a dive watch if you don't dive is a gimmick. Having a chronograph if you don't constantly time things is a gimmick. I could go on and on.

One of the things about the oil filled watch, like my Sinn Ezm2 Hydro that's on the block, is that it has ridiculous viewing angles. You can read that watch almost viewing it completely parallel to the ground. It's something unbelievable to see oh, and there are real-world practicalities for that where the glare is not getting in the way of being able to read the watch.

If it goes beyond having a simple tool to tell us the time when we need it, if that is your definition of the only purpose for a watch, everything is a gimmick.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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And readability. Which isn’t really a gimmick.
Give me a break. If that was the case then a lot more brands would do this. What does “readability” mean specifically, and how does one prove one watch is better than another in that category. I’ve never owned a watch that was hard to read.
 

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Give me a break. If that was the case then a lot more brands would do this. What does “readability” mean specifically, and how does one prove one watch is better than another in that category. I’ve never owned a watch that was hard to read.
Again, as I mentioned above, total internal reflection prevents you from reading a dial in an air filled case at extreme incident angles. I’m not sure why you need to be so militantly ignorant.
 

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Again, as I mentioned above, total internal reflection prevents you from reading a dial in an air filled case at extreme incident angles. I’m not sure why you need to be so militantly ignorant.
Refraction but yes. I think people who haven't seen it in action don't really understand it. If I was going scuba diving with any amount of seriousness the UX would be my top choice.
 

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Refraction but yes. I think people who haven't seen it in action don't really understand it. If I was going scuba diving with any amount of seriousness the UX would be my top choice.
Total internal reflection occurs when the incident angle exceeds the critical angle, and by definition, that occurs when there is no refraction.
 
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Everything that goes beyond reading the time is a gimmick with watches. So if you're going to say have a good oil filled watch is a gimmick, then having a dive watch if you don't dive is a gimmick. Having a chronograph if you don't constantly time things is a gimmick. I could go on and on.

One of the things about the oil filled watch, like my Sinn Ezm2 Hydro that's on the block, is that it has ridiculous viewing angles. You can read that watch almost viewing it completely parallel to the ground. It's something unbelievable to see oh, and there are real-world practicalities for that where the glare is not getting in the way of being able to read the watch.

If it goes beyond having a simple tool to tell us the time when we need it, if that is your definition of the only purpose for a watch, everything is a gimmick.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Pretty cool. Does anyone know how much it would cost to have the battery replaced?
 

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Total internal reflection occurs when the incident angle exceeds the critical angle, and by definition, that occurs when there is no refraction.
Exactly - oil-filled is absolutely not a gimmick (unless you don't understand physics). You get massive pressure resistance while still being super thin, zero fogability due to temp changes, no leaks, insane angle readability, etc

Here's a 5,000m Sinn UX (and it can go all the way to the bottom of the trench - 10KM - without crushing, but the pressure will stop the movement:
UX_SDR_GSG_9.jpg

Here's the Omega deep ocean, 10,000M but uh ... a bit thicker:
636e1605e7df44729b3280d042b4506c.jpg

and if the Sinn UX were at that angle, you could still read the time!
hqdefault.jpg
 

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Give me a break. If that was the case then a lot more brands would do this. What does “readability” mean specifically, and how does one prove one watch is better than another in that category. I’ve never owned a watch that was hard to read.
As mentioned by others, the readability (ability to read the watch and tell time) is vastly improved by the oil inside.

Notice how on any watch when you change the viewing angle you can no longer see it quite as well? Under water that effect is far greater. Filling the watch with oil takes away that effect.

All your watches are easy to read? Great.
Don’t need it? Fine.
Don’t understand it so bash it as a gimmick? Go right ahead.

Here are some pictures of watches under water. Do you really need me to explain how one watch is more readable than another?

 

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Done it on my mudman, and will rebuild it without the air bubble I intentionally left at first try to compensate for thermal expansion. Silicone oil expansion rate are so low that the watch don't need any bubble.
I will use a vacuum chamber to extract any air who could be trapped inside the movement.
 
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