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Simple, it does not run the risk of being damaged being on the non-dominant arm.....
 
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Taken from Desmond article, this is only for bumpers;

"The Omega 300 series bumper is a relatively uncomplicated movement, fully jewelled (17 jewels) to the centre
wheel and the upper and lower pivots of the oscillating weight. The winding system operates through the
oscillating weight moving in an anti-clockwork direction to drive a ratchet wheel (used to restrict motion in one
direction)....

A novel aspect of bumper movements is that they perform best when worn on the left wrist. Wearing a 300
series of the right wrist interferes with the anti-clockwise oscillation of the rotor weight and results in very
limited winding opportunity."
 

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Yep. In addition, one could argue that it might get in the way on the dominant arm for example when you try to pull something out of a tight space. Finally, in terms of absolute ergonomics there are two considerations. Why weigh down the dominant arm and give it more weight at it's largest extension thereby making that arm in theory harder to move? And, imagine you carry something or just do any other action with your dominant arm, with the watch on the other arm you can still check the watch. That gets difficult if you carry a 30lb suitcase in that hand.

Till
 

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It's easier for a right handed person to put the watch on the left hand using the dominant hand, especially if the watch has a tang buckle.
 
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Simple, it does not run the risk of being damaged being on the non-dominant arm.....
As a lefty/lefty guy, I do get my share of bumps, near misses and "oh craps". (I'm a pretty clumsy dude however.) Put a watch on my right wrist one night but it seemed unnatural.
 
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Comfort and convenience. Not only does it interfere less with daily activities on the left (or non-dominant) wrist, but also it is easier to put on the wrist and operate the watch's functions.
 

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I have a Girard-Perregaux Classique Elegance (ref. 49570) on my left wrist and a Zenith El Primero (ref. 02.0501.400) on my right wrist as I'm typing this. I'm right-handed, usually wear watches on the left, but sometimes I switch, and at other times I have watches on both wrists.
 

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Maybe it's a throw back with practical reasons.

As someone said earlier, they preferred that the watch be on their non-writing wrist.

Think about pocket watches.

I think that the watch usually sat in the waistcoat pocket of your non-writing wrist for a similar reason, so that you could look at the time and write at the same time.

Just a theory.
 

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I'm left handed, and I wear my watch on the right wrist. It's less in the way there, and less prone to damage.

However, I do hate the fact that the crown/buttons aren't accessible or visible when I'm wearing long sleeves. I consider them part of the signature adornment of the piece. :-(
 

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Because it's much easier to wind since the crown is on the right side silly !
:-d:-d
 

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I'm right-handed but wear my watch on the right 'cos my right wrist is slightly bigger than my left n for a skinny guy like me,the extra flesh allows the watch to sit more comfortably. Also,since many crowns are on the right of the watch,wearing them on my right prevents them from digging into the back of my hand. I just have to be more careful when writing or doing stuff with my right hand.
 

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I wouldn't call myself ambidextrous at all but...

I am a righty but wear my watches on my right hand a) because it feels more comfortable, b) because when I'm working and need to write down a date, I already have a pen in my right hand and all I have to do is flip my wrist to see the time and continue writing, looking in the same general direction as when I started and c) I feel that I'd be more aware of my right hand if somebody tried to take a watch off of me in a theft situation (which has happened in the past)

But... I'm a lefty in the sense that I steer my car with my left hand even though I have automatic transmission cars.

My friends have all badgered me about wearing my watch on the wrong hand but personally I don't think I'll change unless I have some kind of life changing event.
 

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Simply because you would more likely be reaching for something/holding something with your dominant arm, and would be less likely to damage the watch if it were on the other arm. Makes writing easier too.
 

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I'm left handed and wear my watch on my right. I found that my first watch, a Mickey Mouse model, used to catch on pages during school, moved arms and never went back. :)
Right handed and wear the watch on the right wrist. I had a similar situation as well in that I think it was just easier to buckle the watch with my left had so it went on the right wrist. Still to this day can't buckle a watch with my right hand.
 

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The interesting thing is, I find that many left-handers, wear their watch on the...left wrist.....according to a thread here not too long ago. The handful of friends/ acquaintances I know that are left-handed, most also wear watches on the left wrist. I remember reading someone's comment that said "it's what everyone else does". I'm a right-handed semi-ambidextrous (swing baseball bat and golf left), and find some watches are more comfortable on my right wrist, so I often wear on the right wrist.
 
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